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1/1 B R.AR.Y 

OF THE 
UNIVERSITY 
OF ILLINOIS 

IZ^Tla, 

V304/05 
cop. 2 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS BULLETIN 

Vol. 1 JUNE 15, 1904 No. 18 

[Entered at Urbana, Illinois, as second-class matter] 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



OF THE 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 




PUBLISHED FORTNIGHTLY BY THE UNIVERSITY 



1. 


Men's Gymnasium. 


2. 


Armory. 


3. 


Wood Shop. 


4. 


Metal Shops. 


S. 


Electrical and Me- 
chanical Laboratory. 


6. 


Reservoir. 


7. 


Heating Plant. 


8. 


Pumping Plant. 


9. 


Laboratory of Applied 
Mechanics. 


10. 


Engineering Hall. 


11. 


Greenhouse. 


12. 


President's House. 


13. 


Library. 


14. 


University Hall. 


15. 


Natural History Hall. 


16. 


College of Law. 


17. 


Chemical Laboratory. 


18. 


Agricultural Build- 
ings. 


19. 


Greenhouse. 


20. 


Veterinary Building. 


21. 


Insectary. 



W I E 

S 




UNIVERSITY GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



OF THE 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



1904-1905 




URBANA, ILLINOIS 

PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY 



c 

Ccrp- 3L 



PrU 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Calendar 4 

Board of Trustees 6 

Officers of Administration 7 

Heads of Departments 9 

Location and History 11 

Organization of the University 12 

Buildings and Grounds 15 

Laboratories and Collections 16 

History of the Graduate School 24 

J Admission and Registration 25 

Studies and Examinations .27 

| Degrees . . . .- 29 

-v. Fellowships 31 

Courses of Study 33 

Subjects of the College of Literature and Arts . . 34 

Subjects of the College of Science 50 

Subjects of the College of Agriculture 68 

Subjects of the College of Engineering .... 76 

Societies and Clubs 86 

Expenses 90 



THE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

1904-1905 



1904 
Sept. 7, Wednesday. 
Sept. 12, 13, Monday 

and Tuesday. 
Sept. 14, Wednesday. 
Oct. 31, Monday. 

Nov. 24, Thursday. 
Dec. 21, Wednesday. 

1905. 
Jan. 3, Tuesday. 
Jan. 27, Friday. 



Jan. 30, Monday. 

May 11, 12, Thursday 
and Friday. 

May 12, Friday eve- 
ning. 

May 11, 12, 13, Thurs- 
day to Saturday. 

May 13, Saturday. 

May 22, Monday. 

May 26, Friday. 
June 4, Sunday. 
June 5, Monday. 
June 6, Tuesday. 
June 7, Wednesday. 



FIEST SEMESTER 

Entrance Examinations begin. 

Registration Days. 
Instruction begins. 
Latest date for announcing Subjects of 

Theses. 
Thanksgiving Day. 
Holiday Recess begins. 

Instruction resumed. 
First Semester ends. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Instruction begins. 

University High School Conference. 
Interscholastic Oratorical Contest. 

Public School Art Exhibit. 

Interscholastic Athletic Meet. 
j Hazel ton Prize Drill. 
( Company Competitive Drill. 

Latest Day for Acceptance of Theses. 

Baccalaureate Address. 

Class Day. 

Alumni Day. 

Thirty-fourth Annual Commencement. 



Sept. 13, Wednesday. 
Sept. 18, 19, Monday 

and Tuesday. 
Sept. 20, Wednesday. 
Nov. 6, Monday. 

Nov. 30, Thursday. 
Dec. 15, Friday. 

1906. 
Jan. 2, Tuesday. 
Jan. 26, Friday. 



FIEST SEMESTER 

Entrance Examinations begin. 

Registration Days. 
Instruction begins. 
Latest date for Announcing Subjects of 

Theses. 
Thanksgiving Day. 
Holiday Recess begins. 

Instruction resumed. 
First Semester Ends. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



The Governor of Illinois Ex Officio 

KICHAED YATES Springfield. 

The President of the State Board of Agriculture, ' ' 
JAMES K. DICKIRSON Lawrenceville. 

The Superintendent of Public Instruction .... " 
ALFRED BATLISS Springfield 



ALICE ASBURY ABBOTT Urbana 

1108 W. Illinois St. 

FREDERIC L. HATCH Spring Grove 

AUGUSTUS F. NIGHTINGALE . . Chicago 
159 LaSalle St. 



Term of Office 

expires in 

1905. 



ALEXANDER McLEAN Macomb ] Term of Office 

SAMUEL A. BULLARD Springfield \ expires in 

CARRIE T. ALEXANDER Belleville j 1907. 

WILLIAM B. McKINLEY .... Champaign 1 Term of Office 
LEONID AS H. KERRICK . . . Bloomington j- expires in 
LAURA B. EVANS Taylorville ] 1909. 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

Frederic L. Hatch .... Spring Grove President. 

William L. Pillsbury . . Urbana Secretary. 

Elbridge G. Keith .... Chicago Treasurer. 

First National Bank. 

Professor S. W. Shattuck, Urbana, Business Manager. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Fredric L. Hatch, Chairman; Augustus F. Nightingale, William 

B. McKinley. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

President: ANDREW S. DRAPER, LL.D. Office, Library 
Building. 

Business Manager: SAMUEL W. SHATTUCK, C.E. Office, 
Library Building. Office hours, 3 to 5 p. m. 

Registrar: WILLIAM L. PILLSBURY, A.M. Office, Library 
Building. Office hours, 2 to 5 p. m. 

COUNCIL OF ADMINISTRATION 

ANDREW SLOAN DRAPER, LL.D., President. 

President's House, University Campus, V.* 

THOMAS JONATHAN BURRILL, Ph.D., LL.D., Vice-Pres- 
ident. Dean of the Graduate School and Professor of 
Botany and Horticulture. 1007 West Green Street, U. 

NATHAN CLIFFORD RICKER, D.Arch., Dean of the 
College of Engineering and Professor of Architecture. 

612 West Green Street, U. 
STEPHEN ALFRED FORBES, Ph.D., Dean of the College 
of Science and Professor of Zoology. 

1209 West Springfield Avenue, U. 

DAVID KINLEY, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Litera- 
ture and Arts and Professor of Economics, Secretary. 

1101 West Oregon Street, U. 

EUGENE DAVENPORT, M.Agr., Dean of the College of 
Agriculture and Professor of Thremmatology. 

Experiment Station Farm, TJ. 

WILLIAM EDWARD QUINE, M.D., Dean of the College 
of Medicine and Professor of the Practice of Medicine and 
Clinical Medicine. Columbus Memorial Building, Chicago. 



*U. stands for Urbana, C. for Champaign. 



8 



VIOLET DELILLE JAYNE, Ph.D., Dean of the Woman's 
Department and Associate Professor of the English Lan- 
guage and Literature. 1017 West Oregon Street, U. 

THOMAS ARKLE CLARK, B.L., Dean of Undergraduates 
and Assistant to the President. Professor of Rhetoric. 

928 West Illinois Street, U 

OLIVER ALBERT HARKER, A.M., Dean of the College 
of Law and Professor of Law. 

Carbondale, Illinois, Hotel Beardsley, 6. 

LIBRARIAN 
KATHARINE LUCINDA SHARP, Ph.M., B.L.S., Librarian. 
Office, Library. 



HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS OFFERING GRAD- 
UATE COURSES. 



THOMAS JONATHAN BURRILL, Ph. D., LL. D., Professor 
of Botany. 1007 West Greeen Streeet, TJ. 

NATHAN CLIFFORD BICKER, D. Arch., Professor of Archi- 
ture. 612 West Green Street, TJ. 

SAMUEL WALKER SHATTUCK, C.E., Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 1018 West California Avenue, TJ. 

IRA OSBORN BAKER, C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

702 West University Avenue, C. 

STEPHEN ALFRED FORBES, Ph. D., Professor of Zoology. 

1209 West Springfield Avenue, TJ. 

CHARLES WESLEY ROLFE, M.S,, Professor of Geology. 

601 East John Street, C. 

ARTHUR NEWELL TALBOT, C.E., Professor of Municipal 
and Sanitary Engineering. 1011 California Avenue, TJ. 

SAMUEL WILSON PARR, M.S., Professor of Applied Chem- 
istry. 919 West Green Street, TJ. 

HERBERT JEWETT BARTON, A.M., Professor of the Latin 

Language and Literature. 406 West Hill Street, C. 

CHARLES MELVILLE MOSS, Ph.D., Professor of the Greek 
Language and Literature. 806 South Mathews Avenue, TJ. 

DANIEL KILHAM DODGE, Ph.D., Professor of the English 
Language and Literature. 308 West Hill Street, C. 

LESTER PAIGE BRECKENRIDGE, Ph.B., Professor of Me- 
chanical Engineering. 1005 West Green Street, TJ. 

DAYID KINLEY, Ph.D. Professor of Economics. 

1101 West Oregon Street, II. 



10 



EUGENE DAVENPORT, M.Agr., Prof essor of Thremmatology. 

Experiment Station Farm, U. 

ALBERT PRUDEN CARMAN, Sc.D., Professor of Physics. 

908 California Avenue, TJ. 

EYARTS BOUTELL GREENE, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

915 West Illinois Street, TJ. 

GEORGE THEOPHILUS KEMP, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of 
Physiology. 112 West Hill Street, C. 

ARTHUR HILL DANIELS, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy. 

918 West Illinois Street TJ. 

EDWIN GRANT DEXTER, Ph.D. Professor of Education. 

90S West Green Street, TJ. 

ISABEL BEYIER, Ph.M. Professor of Household Science. 

802 West Green Street, TJ. 

CYRIL GEORGE HOPKINS, M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Agron- 
omy. 1001 South Wright Street, C. 

MORGAN BROOKS, Ph.B., M.E., Professor of Electrical En- 
gineering. 1012 West Oregon Street, TJ. 

HERBERT WINDSOR MUMFORD, B.S., Professor of Animal 
Husbandry. 608 South Mathews Avenue, TJ. 

JOSEPH CULLEN BLAIR, Professor of Pomology. 

810 West Oregon Street, TJ. 

THOMAS EDWARD OLIVER, Ph.D., Professor of Romanic 
Languages. 

GEORGE HENRY MEYER, A.M., Assistant Professor of the 
German Language and Literature. 912 California Avenue, TJ. 

HARRY SANDS GRINDLEY, Sc.D., Associate Professor of 
Chemistry. 918 West Green Street, TJ. 



11 



LOCATION AND HISTORY 



LOCATION 

The University of Illinois is situated in Champaign 
County, in the eastern central part of the state, between the 
cities of Urbana and Champaign, and within the corporate 
limits of the former. It is one hundred and twenty-eight 
miles south of Chicago, at the junction of the Illinois Cen- 
tral, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis, and 
the Wabash railroads. The country around is a rich and 
prosperous agricultural region. The cities of Urbana and 
Champaign have, together, a population of about 17,000. 

HISTORY 

The University was incorporated February 28, 1867, un- 
der the name of the Illinois Industrial University, and was 
opened to students March 21, 1868. At first only men were 
received, but on March 9, 1870, women were also admitted. 
The institution is in part endowed by the national govern- 
ment, and is maintained by the State of Illinois. The present 
value of property is estimated at $2,600,000. .In 1885 the 
state legislature changed the name to the University of Illi- 
nois. In the same year also, by act of the legislature, the 
State Laboratory of Natural History was transferred from 
the Illinois State Normal University. The Agricultural 
Experiment Station^ founded upon an annual congressional 
donation, was established in 1887. The Graduate School 
dates from 1892. May 1, 1896, the Chicago College of Phar- 
macy, located at 465 State street, Chicago, became the 
School of Pharmacy of the University of Illinois. A School 
of Law organized in 1897 became the College of Law in 



12 

1900. The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Chicago, 
Corner Congress and Honore Streets, became, April 21, 
1897, the College of Medicine of the University of Illinois; 
the instruction in music was reorganized and the School of 
Music was established, and the State Library School was 
opened in September of that year. The School (now Colleye) 
of Dentistry, Corner of Harrison and Honore Streets, Chi- 
cago, was opened October 3, 1901. 

The corps of instruction for the year 1903-1904, not 
counting administrative officers, includes 101 professors, 
42 associate professors, 41 assistant professors and 136 in- 
structors and assistants. The total number of students for 
the same year is 3594, of whom 2876 are men and 718 
women. 2552 are connected with the departments in Ur- 
bana, and 1042 in Chicago. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE UNIVERSITY 
For the purpose of more efficient administration, the 
University is divided into several colleges and schools. 
This division does not imply that the colleges and schools 
are educationally separate. They are interdependent, and 
together form a unit. In addition to the courses mentioned 
as given in each college and school, instruction in military 
science and physical training is provided. The organiza- 
tion is as follows: 

I. The College of Literature and Arts. 

II. The College of Engineering. 

III. The College of Science. 

IY. The College of Agriculture. 

Y. The Graduate School. 

YI. The School of Library Science. 

VII. The School of Music. 

VIII. The College of Law. 

IX. The College of Medicine. 

X. The School of Pharmacy. 

XL The College of Dentistry. 



13 



THE COLLEGE OF LITERATURE AND ARTS 

The College of Literature and Arts offers a wide range 
of subjects in philosophy and the arts, including: 

1. The ancient classical languages. 

2. English literature and language, including rhetoric. 

3. The Romanic languages, including French, Italian and 
Spanish. 

4. The Germanic languages, including German, Scandinavian 
and Danish. 

5. The political and social sciences, including history, eco- 
nomics, sociology, anthropology, and science of government. 

6. Courses of training for business. 

7. Philosophical subjects, including philosophy, mathemat- 
ics, psychology, education, and ethics. 

8. Courses in library science, consisting of three years' col- 
lege work, followed by the first year in the School of Library 
Science. 

THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

The College of Engineering offers courses — 

1. In Architecture. 

2. In Architectural Engineering. 

3. In Civil Engineering. 

4. In Electrical Engineering. 

5. In Mechanical Engineering. 

6. In Municipal and Sanitary Engineering. 

7. In Railway Engineering. 

THE COLLEGE OF SCIENCE 
The College of Science offers courses in — 



1. 


General Science. 


2. 


Chemistry. 


3. 


Education. 


4. 


Household Science. 


5. 


Library Science. 


6. 


Mathematics. 


7. 


Physics. 


8. 


Studies Preliminary to Medicine, 



u 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

The College of Agriculture offers courses in — 

1. Agronomy. 

2 Animal Husbandry. 

3. Dairy Husbandry. 

4. Horticulture. 

5. Household Science. 

6. Veterinary Science. 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

The Graduate School offers courses in twenty-seven dis- 
tinct subjects, as follows: agronomy, animal husbandry, 
architecture, botany, chemistry, civil engineering, eco- 
nomics, education, electrical engineering, English lan- 
guage and literature, French, geology, German, Greek, 
history, horticulture, household science, Latin, mathe- 
matics, mechanical engineering, municipal and sanitary 
engineering, philosophy, physics, physiology, psychology, 
thremmatology, and zoology. 

The courses of instruction under these subjects are here- 
after described. 

THE SCHOOL OF LIBRARY SCIENCE 

The School of Library Science, or the State Library 

School, offers a course of study extending over five years, 

three of which are in either the College of Literature and 

Arts or the College of Science. The last two years are 

devoted to courses in library science in the Library School. 

The full course leads to the degree of bachelor of library 

science. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

The School of Music offers courses in vocal and instru- 
mental music, leading to the degree of bachelor of music. 

THE COLLEGE OF LAW 
The College of Law offers a course of study leading to 
the degree of bachelor of laws. 



15 



THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 
The College of Medicine offers a course of study leading 
to the degree of doctor of medicine. 

THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
The School of Pharmacy offers a course in all branches 
necessary to a complete scientific and practical knowledge 
of pharmacy, including pharmacy, chemistry, materia med 
ica, botany, physics, and physiology. The course leads to 
the degree of graduate in pharmacy. 

THE COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY 

The College of Dentistry offers a course leading to the 
degree of doctor of dental surgery. 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

The land occupied by the University embraces about 
220 acres. The campus is roomy and presents a very 
attractive appearance. The main buildings, 20 in num- 
ber, include the Library Building containing stack-room 
space for 150,000 books, reading rooms, seminary rooms, 
administrative offices and quarters for the Library 
School; University Hall, a large structure of four main 
floors containing the administrative offices and class 
rooms of the College of Literature and Arts and the 
rooms of the School of Music; the Law Building in 
which are the offices, lecture rooms, moot court room, 
library, etc., of the College of Law; Natural History Hall 
in which are housed the departments of botany, zoology, 
physiology, and geology and the apartments of the State 
Laboratory of Natural History; the Astronomical Observ- 
atory, the Chemical Laboratory of three stories with a 
large lecture room, a number of large and several small 
laboratory apartments, supply room, offices, etc.; the 
Agricultural Building of four independent structures 



16 

built around an open court providing rooms for the admin- 
istrative offices of the College and of the Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station, and for the departments of agronomy, an- 
imal husbandry, dairy husbandry, horticulture, veterinary 
science and household science; the Engineering Halloi four 
stories devoted to the offices, class rooms, drawing rooms, 
laboratories, etc., of the departments of architecture, 
civil, electrical, mechanical and municipal engineering and 
of physics; the Wood Shop, for instruction and practice 
with wood working tools and machines; the Metal Shops 
for work with metal working tools and machines; the 
Mechanical and Electrical Engineering Laboratory, the 
Laboratory of Applied Mechanics; the Central Heating 
Station-, the Pumping Station from which the University 
is abundantly supplied with water; the Armory having 
one grand hall 100 by 150 feet; the Metis Gymnasium, — a 
three-story structure providing all the facilities of a 
modern gymnasium; and the Presidents Souse. A Wo- 
man's Building is in course of construction. The build- 
ings for the Colleges of Medicine and of Dentistry and 
for the School of Pharmacy are in Chicago, and furnish 
excellent quarters for these important organizations. 

LABORATORIES AND COLLECTIONS 
SCIENCE LABORATORIES 

The botanical, geological, physiological, and zoological 
laboratories are in Natural History Hall. 

The chemical laboratory occupies the building of the same 
name, already described. 

The physical laboratory is in Engineering Hall. It is 
provided with piers, a constant temperature room, and 
other conveniences for measurement work. 

The psychological laboratory, in University Hall, is well 



17 

provided with apparatus of many different kinds for use in 
experimental study, research, and instruction. 

A laboratory of economic geology, for the investigation of 
clays, lime and cement-making materials, building stones, 
road metal, and all other mineral substances of economic 
value, has been equipped with the necessary appliances for 
such investigations. 

ENGINEERING LABORATORIES 

The cement laboratory of the department of civil engineer- 
ing occupies rooms in Engineering Hall. 

The electrical engineering laboratory occupies space on 
three floors of the Mechanical and Electrical Engineering 
Laboratory. 

The mechanical engineering laboratory occupies the rear 
wing of the Mechanical and Electrical Engineering Lab- 
oratory. 

The hydraulic laboratory and the materials testing lab- 
oratory occupy the Laboratory of Applied Mechanics. 

SPECIAL LABORATORIES FOR RESEARCH 

The chemical laboratory of the Agricultural Experiment 
Station and the student laboratory lot the study of fertility 
of soils are situated on the third floor of the Agricultural 
Building, as are also the bacteriological laboratory and the 
physical laboratory for the examination of soils. 

The materials and hydraulic laboratories occupy the new 
Laboratory of Applied Mechanics. 

The laboratory rooms of the State Laboratory of Nat- 
ural History are in Natural History Hall. 

A Biological Station, equipped for field and experimental 
work in aquatic biology, is maintained on the Illinois River 
by the State Laboratory of Natural History. It has its 
separate staff, but is open to students of the University at 



18 

all times, on application, and daring the summer months 
to special students not connected with the University. 

A laboratory for sanitary water analysis has been 
equipped with all necessary appliances, and chemical inves- 
tigation of the water supplies of the state is carried on. 

COLLECTIONS 

AGRICULTURAL 

The various agricultural departments maintain collec- 
tions illustrative of their work, prominent among which 
are those showing typical specimens of standard varieties 
of corn, wax models of fruit and vegetables, an extensive 
horticultural herbarium, specimens of many breeds of live 
stock, a large collection of farm machinery, and exhibits 
of negatives and samples showing progress of certain in- 
vestigations, as with fruit and with corn. 

BOTANICAL 

The herbarium contains about 50,000 mounted specimens 
of plants. The flora of North America is fairly well rep- 
resented, the collection of species of flowering plants 
indigenous to Illinois is particularly complete, and a con- 
siderable collection of foreign species has been made. The 
collections of fungi amount to 32,000 named specimens, 
and include a full set of those most injurious to other plants, 
causing rusts, smuts, moulds, etc. There are specimens of 
wood from 200 species of native trees and shrubs, which 
well illustrate the varieties of native wood. 

Plaster casts represent fruits of many of the leading vari- 
eties, as well as interesting specimens of morphology, show- 
ing peculiarities of growth, effects of cross-cultivation, etc. 

ENGINEERING 
The following departments of the College of Engineer- 



19 

ing have made extensive and valuable collections, which 
are placed in rooms in Engineering Hall. 

Architecture 
A large number of specimens of stone, bricks, terra cotta, 
sanitary fixtures, casts of moldings and of ornament have 
been accumulated, together with some excellent specimens 
of industrial arts, models of structures, working drawings 
of important buildings, 4,588 lantern slides, 20,000 plates 
and photographs, an excellent working library, and a large 
classified collection of plates from architectural journals. 

Civil Engineering 
The civil engineering department has a large room con- 
taining samples of iron, steel, wood, brick, and stone; 
materials for roads and pavements; models of arches and 
trusses, one of the latter being full-sized details of an actual 
modern railroad bridge. The department also possesses a 
very large collection of photographs and blue-print work- 
ing drawings of bridges, metal skeleton buildings, masonry 
structures, and standard railroad construction. 

Electrical Engineering 
The department has a collection of samples illustrating 
standard practice in the industrial applications of electric- 
ity. There is also a rapidly growing collection of lantern 
slides, photographs, blue-prints, drawings, pamphlets, and 
other engineering data. 

Mechanical Engineering 
This department has among other things a partial set 
of Reuleaux models, together with models of valve gears, 
sections of steam pumps, injectors, valves, skeleton steam 
and water gauges, standard packings, steam -pipe cover- 
ings, and drop forgings. There are also fine examples of 
castings, perforated metal, defective boiler plates, and 



20 

sets of drills, with numerous samples of oil, iron, and 
steel. A large number of working drawings from lead- 
ing firms and from the United States Navy Department 
forms a valuable addition to the above collections. 

GEOLOGICAL 

Lithology is represented by type collections of rocks 
(9,000 specimens), arranged to illustrate Rosenbusch;from 
Voight and Hochgesang, L. Eger, and A. Kranz; a type 
collection from Ward; 1,000 thin sections of rocks and 
minerals; a large number of ornamental building stones; 
a stratigraphic collection to illustrate Illinois geology, 
and a collection of Illinois soils (104). 

The Miner alogical collection is especially rich in 
rock-forming minerals, ores, and materials of economic 
value. It contains over 12,000 specimens carefully se- 
lected to meet the wants of the student, and 575 crystal 
models. 

The paleontological collection (49,000 specimens) con- 
tains representative fossils from the entire geologic ser- 
ies, but is especially rich in paleozoic forms. It embraces 
the private collections of A. H. Worthen (including 742 
type specimens); Tyler McWhorter; Mr. Hertzer; 200 
thin sections of corals; the Ward collection of casts, and 
a considerable number of special collections representing 
the fauna and flora of particular groups. 

LIBEAEY ECONOMY 

A collection of books and phamplets on library 
science, of library reports and catalogs, of mounted sam- 
ples showing methods of administration in all depart- 
ments, and of labor-saving devices and fittings has been 
made, and is arranged by the Dewey Decimal classifica- 
tion in the Library School seminary room. 



21 

PEDAGOGICAL 
In the rooms of the department of education in Uni- 
versity Hall is a considerable collection of illustrative 
material from the manual training departments of various 
schools; photographs of school buildings, drawings and 
construtive work by pupils in the public schools, and the 
nucleus of a representative collection of apparatus for the 

school laboratory. 

ZOOLOGICAL 

The zoological collections have been specially selected 
and prepared to illustrate the courses of study in natural 
history, and to present a synoptical view of the zoology 
of the state. 

The mounted mammals comprise an unusually large 
and instructive collection of the ruminants of our coun- 
try, including male and female moose, elk, bison, deer, 
antelope, etc., and also several quadrumana, large carniv- 
ora and fur-bearing animals, numerous rodents, good 
representative marsupials, cetaceans, edentates, and inono- 
tremes. Fifty-nine species of this class are represented 
by one hundred and one specimens and all the others, 
excepting the Sirenia, are represented by mounted skele- 
tons. There is also a series of dissections in alcohol, 
illustrating the comparative anatomy of the group. 

The collection of mounted birds includes representa- 
tives of all the orders and families of North America, 
together with a number of characteristic tropical, Bor- 
nean and New Zealand forms. The collection is practi- 
cally complete for Illinois species. There is also a fine 
collection of the nests and eggs of Illinois birds. A series 
of several hundred unmounted skins is available for the 
practical study of species, and the internal anatomy is 
shown in alcoholic dissections, and in mounted skeletons 
of all the orders. 



22 



The cold-blooded vertebrates are represented by a 
series of mounted skins of the larger species, both terres- 
trial and marine; mounted skeletons of typical represen- 
tatives of the principal groups; alcoholic specimens; both 
entire and dissected, and casts. The alcoholics include 
series of the reptiles, amphibians, and fishes, the latter 
comprising about 300 species. The dissections illustrate 
the internal anatomy of the principal groups. The casts 
represent about seventy five species, nearly all fishes. 

The mollusca are illustrated by alcoholic specimens 
of all classes and orders, and dissections showing the 
internal anatomy of typical forms. There are several 
thousand shells belonging to 1,700 species. The collec- 
tion of Illinois shells is fair but incomplete. 

The collection of insects has been greatly extended 
and enriched by the Bolter Collection, donated to the 
University by the executors of the estate of the late An- 
dreas Bolter, of Chicago, which now contains over 16,000 
species, represented by about 120,000 specimens, named, 
labled, and systematically arranged. 

The lower invertebrates are represented by several 
hundred dried specimens and alcoholics, and by a large 
series of the famous Blaschka glass models. 

The embryology of vertebrates and invertebrates is 
illustrated by several sets of Ziegler wax models, and 
numerous series of slides, sections, and other prepara- 
tions. 

In addition to the above, the extensive collections of 
the State Laboratory of Natural History are available for 
illustrative purposes, as well as for original investigation 
by advanced students. 

AET GALLERY 

The University Art Galley was the gift of citizens 



23 

of Champaign and Urbana. It occupies a room in the 
basement of the Library Building, and furnishes an ex- 
cellent collection of models for students of art. In sculp- 
ture it embraces thirteen full-size casts of celebrated 
statues, forty statues of reduced size, and a large num- 
ber of busts and bas-reliefs, making in all over 400 
pieces. It includes also hundreds of large autotypes, 
photographs, and fine engravings, representing many of 
the great masterpieces of painting of nearly all the mod- 
ern schools, and a gallery of historical portraits, mostly 
large French lithographs, copied from the great national 
portrait galleries of France. 

Other collections of special value to art students em- 
brace a large number of casts of ornament from the 
Alhambra and other Spanish buildings, presented by the 
Spanish government; a set of casts from Germany, illus- 
trating German renaissance ornament; a series of art 
works from the Columbian Exposition; large numbers of 
miscellaneous casts, models, prints, and drawings, such 
as are usually found in the best art schools, and a model 
in plaster and a complete set of drawings of a competitive 
design by Henry Lord Gay for a monument to be erected 
in Rome, commemorative of Victor Emmanuel, first king 

of Italy. 

LIBRARIES 

The general University library, the library of the 
State Laboratory of Natural History, and that of the Col- 
lege of Law are all at the University in Urbana. The 
libraries of the Colleges of Medicine and Dentistry and of 
the School of Pharmacy are in Chicago. 

The general University library contains 63,724 vol- 
umes and 14,512 pamphlets. The reading room contains 
755 periodicals. The library of the State Laboratory of 
Natural History contains 5,350 volumes and 15,850 pamph- 



24 



lets. The Library of the College of Law contains the 
Federal and State Reports, the leading text-books, and a 
line of leading periodicals. The department of education 
has made a special collection of about 1,500 books and 
5,000 pamphlets, which are kept in the rooms of the 
department in University Hall. This collection contains 
a very good assortment of modern text-books, and copies 
of the courses of study of nearly all the large city school 
systems. 

The Quine Library of the College of Medicine practi- 
cally contains every book of reference required by med- 
ical students and all of the important medical periodicals. 

The general library at the University is open daily, 
except Sunday, from 8 a. m. until 5 p. m. and from 6:30 
p. m. until 9 p. m. on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 
and (Thursdays. The reading rooms are open from 8 a. 
m. jintil 9 p. m. on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 
and Thursdays, and until 5 p. m. Fridays and Saturdays. 

The Public Library of the City of Champaign con- 
tains the valuable library of western history collected by 
Edward G. Mason, Esq., long President of the Chicago 
Historical Society. The collection is accessible to Uni- 
versity students. 



25 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Thomas J. Btjrrill, Ph.D., LL.D., Dean. 
HISTORY 

The Graduate School was established in 1892, for the 
purpose of offering facilities for advanced study and 
research to graduates in a more systematic way than had 
hitherto been done in the University. In 1894 the School 
was placed in the general charge of the newly organized 
Council of Administration and the office of Dean was es- 
tablished. To the Dean was assigned the executive or 
administrative duties required. Graduate instruction had 
been given in certain departments of the University, and 
second, or master's degrees had been annually conferred 
during several years before the establishment of the 
Graduate School, but no conditions had been previously 
formulated upon which the doctor's degree (Doctor of 
Philosophy) would be given. The first publication of the 
requirements for this degree appeared in the Catalog for 
the year 1893-4 and the conditions then announced have 
since remained in force. The degree however, was not 
conferred until 1903, when two candidates successfully 
passed the prescribed requirements. 

In order further to promote graduate study the pro- 
vision was made when the School was established that its 
members should pay no fees of any kind and four fellow- 
ships were created each with a stipend of $400. Later, 
two more fellowships of the same value were added in 
the same way by the trustees. In 1898 these were changed 
to eight fellowships of $300 each. In 1904 the payment 
by graduates of the same fees required of undergraduates 
was ordered, except that fellows continue excused from 
such payments. 



26 

ADMISSION AND KEGISTBATION 
Graduates of the University of Illinois, and of other 
colleges and universities of approved standing, may be 
admitted to membership in the Graduate School upon 
presentation of their credentials. Other persons suitably 
qualified may gain admission by special vote of the Coun- 
cil of Administration upon such conditions as may be 
imposed in each case. To gain admission to particular 
graduate courses or departments the special preparation 
for this must be found sufficient, and an advanced degree 
for which candidacy is sought must be in line with the 
bachelor degree received. Candidates for admission may 
secure application blanks from the Dean or from the Reg- 
istrar of the University, and these, properly filled out, 
should be filed, together with such documentary matter 
as may be presented, showing qualifications for member- 
ship in the School, with the former officer. This should 
be done not later than the time set for registration in 
September. Admission may be granted at other times, 
but the time limit required for degrees counts from the 
date of the certificate of membership. 

With the exceptions named below, all members of the 
Graduate School are required to be in regular attend- 
ance at the University, and to do all the work for which 
they are registered in the departments to which such work 
belongs. In case of absence on leave, or when absence is 
necessary to carry on investigations included in approved 
courses of study, the requirement of continuous residence 
may be modified by the Council of Administration. 

Graduates of this University may be admitted to non- 
resident membership in the Graduate School, as candi- 
dates for second or masters' degrees. In this case cor- 
respondence should first be addressed to the head of the 
department in charge of the major subject desired. All 



27 

members of the School who have completed the residence 
required for advance degrees may register as non-residents 
while completing the work required for such degrees. 

Members of the Graduate School register with the 
Dean during the registration days, at the beginning of 
the collegiate year. 

Those only are enrolled as members of the Graduate 
School who enter upon or pursue approved graduate 
work as explained under "Studies and Examinations" 
below. Resident graduates who are candidates for bach- 
elor degrees are not included, neither are those who, not 
working for any degree, have registered without a major 
subject approved as graduate work. 

STUDIES AND EXAMINATIONS 

As far as can be indicated by a statement of time, full 
work for a graduate student consists in the use of forty- 
five hours a week in the lecture rooms, laboratories, etc., 
and in private study, equal to 30 semester hours' credit, 
exclusive of the preparation of a thesis. A semester hour 
is the credit given for one study on which the student is 
supposed to spend 3 hours of time each day 5 days a week 
for 18 weeks. Assignments of work are made upon this 
basis; but great variations naturally result from the sub- 
ject-matter in hand, and from the abilities of individuals. 

Each student must select one principal line of study, 
and upon this major subject at least one-half, 15 "hours," 
and in the subjects of the College of Engineering at least 
two-thirds, 20 "hours", of his work must be done; and 
any greater proportion of his time, up to the whole of it, 
may thus be devoted if proper approval is had. When 
work upon the selected major subject is not arranged to 
require all of the student's attention, he must choose one 
or two minor subjects, as may be necessary to complete a 
full course of study, 30 "hours". Usually, at least one 



28 



minor subject should be taken. Not more than two may- 
be taken at the same time. 

The major study must be approved as graduate work 
for this University, preceded by an amount of undergrad- 
uate preparation specified in connection with the courses 
of study or determined by the officers in charge. The 
minor subjects may, under approval, be chosen from the 
offerings to graduates, or from undergraduate courses of 
advanced grade, except that all work must be selected from 
graduate offerings in the subjects of the College of Engin- 
eering. In these the major line of study must be either a 
single subject or a combination of related subjects. But 
all candidates for advanced degrees must direct their selec- 
tions toward some well-defined end, determined for the most 
part by the character and purpose of the major study. 

All courses of study leading to degrees in the Graduate 
School are subject to approval, first, by the head of the de- 
partment of the University in which the major subject for 
each student belongs; second, by the Dean of the College 
including such department; and, third, by the Dean of the 
Graduate School. The signatures of the heads of depart- 
ments in which chosen minor subjects belong must also be 
obtained before the list reaches the Dean of the Graduate 
School. The lists of studies, as finally approved, are depos- 
ited with the Registrar of the University. No changes may 
subsequently be made except under the same line of approv- 
als, but extension of time may be arranged with the profess- 
ors concerned and with the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Examinations are required in all subjects, and reports 
upon these are made to the Registrar of the University. 
Graduate students in undergraduate classes are examined 
with these classes. 

The head of the department in which the student does 
his major work is charged with the direction and supervis- 



29 

ion of such major work, and, in a general way, with the 
supervision of the student's entire course of study. He 
fixes the time and method of all examinations not other- 
wise provided for, sees that they are properly conducted, 
and reports results to the Registrar. It is his duty also to 
keep the Dean of the Graduate School informed concerning 
all matters affecting the interests of the student, and of the 
School in connection therewith. 

DEGREES 
No degrees are given for study in absentia, except that 
graduates of this University, who become members of the 
Graduate School and reside elsewhere, may receive a mas- 
ter's degree upon the completion of their courses of study 
within not less than three years of the date of registration. 
Advanced degrees are conferred by the Trustees of the 
University only upon recommendation of the Senate, based 
upon information furnished by the Council of Administra- 
tion. 

Second Degrees 

The second degrees conferred by this University are as 
follows: 

Master of Arts, after Bachelor of Arts. 

Master of Science, after Bachelor of Science, in courses 
in the College of Agriculture. 

Master of Architecture, after Bachelor of Science, in 
courses of Architecture and Architectural Engineering. 

Civil Engineer, after Bachelor of Science, in the course 
in Civil Engineering. 

Electrical Engineer, after Bachelor of Science, in the 
course in Electrical Engineering. 

Mechanical Engineer, after Bachelor of Science, in the 
course in Mechanical Engineering. 

Pharmaceutical Chemist, after Graduate in Pharmacy. 

All candidates for second degrees are required to regis- 



30 



ter in the Graduate School, to conform to the conditions 
outlined under "Admission and Registration," and "Stud- 
ies and Examinations" (pp. 26 and 27); to pursue an ap- 
proved course of study for one academic year in resi- 
dence, or, in the case of graduates of this University, for 
three years in absentia; and to pass satisfactory examina- 
tions upon all the studies of the approved course. 

Each candidate for a second degree must present an 
acceptable thesis in the line of his major subject of study. 
The subject of this thesis must be announced to the Dean 
of the Graduate School not later than the first Monday in 
November of the academic year in which the course is to 
be completed. The completed thesis, upon regulation 
paper, must be presented, with the certified approval of 
the professor in charge, to the Council of Administration 
not later than June 1st. 

The period of required study begins from the date of 
registration in the Graduate School. 

Doctor's Degree 

The Degree of Doctor of Philosophy may be conferred 
upon any member of the Graduate School of not less 
than three years' standing who shall have reached high 
attainments in scholarship, including a sufficient knowl- 
edge of the French and German languages to serve the 
purposes of research in his principal specialty, who shall 
have shown marked ability in some line of literary or 
scientific investigation, and shall have presented a thesis 
giving clear indications of such scholarship and of such 
power of research. At least the first two, or the last one, 
of the three years of study must be in residence at the 
University, and the entire course of study must be in ac- 
cordance with the regulations of the Graduate School. ' 

The time and study required for a master's degree may 
be included in the three years required, but approval of a 



31 

course of study for a doctor's degree must be upon the 
condition that the candidate is prepared through his bacca- 
laureate work, or otherwise, to enter at once upon advanced 
studies in the line of his major subject, and that work on 
his major subject be continued through the three years. 

The final examination of a candidate for the doctor's 
degree is conducted by a committee consisting of the head 
of the department under which the major subject has 
been pursued, as chairman, and of not less than two addi- 
tional members of the Senate of the University, appointed 
for the purpose by the Council of Administration. This 
examination covers the subjects of the course approved 
for the degree, but is especially searching upon that on 
which the major work has been done. 

Each candidate for a doctor's degree must announce to 
the Dean of the Graduate School a thesis subject not later 
than the first Monday in November of the academic year at 
the close of which the award of the degree is expected. A 
fair copy of the thesis must be submitted, with a certified 
approval of the committee on examinations, to the Coun- 
cil of Administration not later than the first day of June. 
If the thesis is approved by the Council the candidate 
must have it printed and must deposit not less than one 
hundred copies with the librarian of the University. 

FELLOWSHIPS 

The Trustees of the University have established a num- 
ber of fellowships, each with a stipend of three hundred 
dollars, payable in ten monthly installments. 

The rules governing appointments to these fellowships 
are as follows: 

1. The purpose of these fellowships shall be to promote ad- 
vanced scholarship and original research in the University. 

2. The fellowships shall be open to graduates of this and 
similar institutions. Those who are to complete an under 



32 



gradute course previous to the academic year for which 
appointments are made shall be eligible, with others, as 
candidates. 

3. Nominations to fellowships, accompanied by assign- 
ments to special departments of the University, shall be 
made by the Council of Administration to the Trustees of 
the University, upon applications received by the Presi- 
dent of the University each year not later than the first 
day of February. These nominations shall be made at a 
meeting of the Council called for that purpose within the 
month of February. The appointments by the Trustees 
are made at their regular meeting in March, and shall 
take effect the first day of the following September. Va- 
cancies may be filled by similar nominations and appoint- 
ments at other times. 

4. Nominations to fellowships shall be made upon the 
grounds of worthiness of character, scholastic attain- 
ments, and promise of success in the principal line of 
study or research to which the candidate proposes to devote 
himself. Consideration shall also be given to the probable 
value or usefulness of the services of the candidate as an 
assistant in instruction, but this shall not be deemed the 
primary object of the appointment. Other things being 
equal, preference is given to those graduates of this Univer- 
sity who have pursued a specialized or group course.* 

5. Candidates must present, with their applications, 
full information concerning themselves and their qualifi- 
cations for advanced study and research work, including 
any written or printed essays or results of investigation, 
and must name the subject in which they wish to do their 
major work. 



*A11 members of the Colleges of Engineering and Agriculture, of the 
chemical and mathematical groups in the College of Science, of the College 
of Law, and of the Schools of Library Science and Mnsic, are considered 
as pursuing specialized courses. 



33 



6. Fellowships are good for one year, but appointments 
may be renewed to the same person. An appointment as hon- 
orary fellow, without stipend, may be made as specified for 
paid fellowships in the case of anyone who has held a regular 
fellowship and has shown distinguished merit in his work. 

7. Fellows shall be constituted members of the Gradu- 
ite School, shall have all of the privileges and bear all of 
;he responsibilities of such membership. Each regular 
fellow may be called upon to render service in instruction 
throughout the year in the department in which his major 
subject lies, equal to one hour daily of class instruction 
)r to two hours daily of Jaboratory supervision. This ser- 
vice will receive such credit as the Council of Adminis- 
tration may determine in each case. Blank forms for ap- 
plication may be obtained by addressing the Registrar, or 
;he Dean of the Graduate School. 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
Following the description of each course of instruction 
vill be found the necessary requirements, if any, for 
tdmission to that particular course. 

Credit is reckoned in semester "hours," or simply 
fc hours." An "hour" is one class period a week for one 
;emester, each class period pre-supposing two hours' prep- 
iration by the student, or it is the equivalent in labora- 
tory, shop or drawing room. 

The semester, the days, and the class period or periods 
luring which each course is given, and the number of 
'hours" per semester for which the course counts, are 
shown after each course, as follows: The semester is indi- 
cated by the Roman numerals I. , II. ; the days by the initial 
etters of the days of the week; the class period or periods 
of which there are nine each day, numbered consecutively 
Torn one to nine), by Arabic figures; and the "hours" or 
imount of credit, by Arabic figures in parenthesis. 



34 



SUBJECTS OF THE COLLEGE OF LITERATURE 
AND ARTS 

ECONOMICS 
(Including Commerce and Industry). 
The work of the department of economics is expanded 
in the direction both of societal economics and industrial 
economics. A graduate student may pursue work in 
either line. No student will be permitted to elect econom- 
ics as a major unless he has had a thorough course in the 
principles. Students who are not considered sufficiently well 
grounded will be required to take an elementary course 
in conjunction with, or preparatory to, their other work, 
but it cannot be counted towards an advance degree. 

The department is thorougly equipped both in library 
and in staff for the training of students in economic re- 
search in social and industrial lines. The Library con- 
tains complete sets of all important economic serials, in 
English, French, and German, is well equipped in pract- 
ically all important lines of economic research, and has 
abundant material in several. 

The opportunities for work in statistics, theoretical and 
practical, are unusually good. The University possesses 
a number of calculating machines of various kinds which 
are accessible to advanced students in their research 
work. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

3. Money and Banking. — The history and theory of mon- 
ey and banking, and the monetary history of the United States. 
II.; M., W., F.; 4; (3). Assistant Professor Weston. 

Bequired: Economics 1, or 2 and 1. 

4. Financial History of the United States. — A brief 
survey of the fiscal systems of the American colonies followed by 
a study of national finances from the beginning of the American 



35 



Revolution down to the present time. L; M., W., F.; 2; (3). 
Assistant Professor Hammond. 
Required: Economics 1. 

5. Public Finance.— A study of the principles which should 
be followed in making public expenditures and in securing pub- 
lic revenues. II.: Tu.,Th.; 4; (2). Assistant Professor Hammond. 

Required: Economics 1. 

6. Taxation. — An investigation into the methods of taxa- 
tion in the various American Commonwealths. II.; M., W., F.; 
2; (3). Assistant Professor Hammond. 

Required: Economics 5. 

8. The Money Market.— An advanced course dealing with 
rates of exchange, functions of bill broker and banker, causes of 
fluctuations in rates of discount, the concentration of financial 
dealings at such centers as New York and London, international 
payments and the determination of rates of foreign exchange. 
II.; Tu., Th.; 3; (2). Professor Kinley. 

Required: Economics 3 and 9. 

9. Banking.— A course in the study of practical banking, 
with special reference to the United States, England, Germany, 
France and the Orient. I.; Tu., Th.; 7; (2). Assistant Professor 
Weston. 

Required: Economics 3. 

10. Corporation Management and Finance.— The growth 
of corporations; their organization and securities, position and 
relations of stockholders and directors, analysis of reports, stock 
speculation, relation of industrial corporations to international 
competition, receiverships and reorganizations, social and polit- 
ical effects. I.; M., W., F.; 2; (3). Professor Robinson. 

Required: Economics 1, or 2 and 7 or 22. 

11. Industrial Consolidations. — The development of 
industrial consolidations, their causes and forms; the promotion, 
financiering, incorporation and capitalization of corporate con- 
solidations; monopoly prices and monopoly methods; the ability 
of trusts to affect prices, wages, interest and profits; and the 
proposed plans for controlling trusts, such as publicity, taxation 
of profits, and public ownership. II.; M., W., F.; 2; (3). Pro- 
fessor Robinson. 

Required: Economics 10. 

12. The Labor Problem. — The labor movement and its 



36 



social significance. The progress of the laboring classes, strikes, 
arbitration, labor organizations, and similar topics, which are 
studied, show the general character of the course. I.; W., F.; 
4; (3). Professor Kinley. 

Bequired: Economics 1. [Not given in 1904-05.] 

13. Eailway Management. — This course considers from 
the administrative standpoint railways as factors in the social 
and industrial development of the United States and treats of 
the following topics:— (1) Historical: conditions of commerce and 
industry previous to the advent of the railways; primitive meth- 
ods of transportation, etc. (2) Geographical: the economic loca- 
tion of railways, etc. (3) Organization; charter and franchises; 
capital stock; directors and stockholders; departments; the dis- 
tribution of authority and responsibility; (4) Traffic manage- 
ment; (5) Financial: basis of capitalization; use of stocks and 
bonds; stock watering; distribution of earnings; reports and their 
interpretation, etc.; (6) Legal: rights and duties of railways; 
their status under the common and statute law; relation to leased 
lines; to employes; to patrons; taxation; public control through 
commissions. I.; M., W., F.; 4; (3). Professor Robinson. 

Bequired: Economics 1, or 2 and either 7, 16 or 22. From 
junior and senior engineers economics 2, only, will be required. 

14. Railway Systems. — This course is a continuation of 
course 13. II.; M., W., F.; 4; (3). Professor Robinson. 

Bequired: Economics 13. 

17. Sociology. — This course deals with the principles un- 
derlying social organization, and with the nature and develop- 
ment of social institutions. Special attention is given to the 
study of the family, the state and to race assimilation in the 
United States. The latter part of the course treats practical 
problemsof chaiity and crime. II., M., W., F.; 1; (3). Assist- 
ant Professor Hammond. 

Bequired: At least 28 hours of University credit. 

18. Economic Seminary. — For investigation and for the 
study of current economic literature. I., II.; arrange time. 
Professors Kinley, Fisk, Robinson, Hammond, Weston. - 

20. History of Economic Thought. — The history of the 
development of economic theory since the sixteenth century. I., 
II.; 7; (2). Professor Kinley. 

Bequired: 10 hours in economics. 



37 

21. Socialism and Social Keform.— II.; M.,W.,F- 7- (3) 
Assistant Professor Weston. 

Bequired: Economics 1, or 2 and 7. 

23. Statistics. — A course in descriptive statistics. The 
course may be taken by itself, but is better taken with the first 
half of course 24. II. ; F. ; 7; (1). Assistant Professor Hammond. 

Bequired: Economics 1 or 2. 

24. Statistics. — Students of economics should take this 
course and 23 together. Those who do not wish the mathemat- 
ical theory of probability may drop out of the class when that 
part of the subject is reached. For them the mathematical re- 
quirement for entrance is not enforced, and courses 23 and 24 
xmnt for four hours' credit. All who take the course must take 
30th parts of it, as described under mathematics 26, which see. 

Bequired: Economics I, or 2 and 7. 

27. History of Commerce.— A general survey of commerce 
rom ancient times, with special stress on the growth of com- 
nerce since the discovery of America, I.; M. W F • 3- (3) 
Professor Fisk. "' '' 

Bequired: Economics 1, 7 and 26. 

28. Domestic Commerce and Commercial Politics. — A 
omparative study of the various forms of commercial organiza- 
lon, such as general wholesale and retail trade, department 
o-operative, and company stores, peddling, huckstering, and 
awking,booths, auctions, commercial agents, including com- 
mercial travelers, and the coupon system. I • M w" F • V 
5). Professor Fisk. ' *' '' 

Bequired: Economics 1, 7 and 26. [Not given in 1904-05.] 

29. Foreign Commerce and Commercial Politics — Con- 
inuation of course 28. A study of the various commercial sys- 
^ms (mercantile, free trade, and protective); kinds of tariffs; 
)mmercial treaties, reciprocity; commercial statistics and bai- 
lees; institutions for furthering export trade (commercial mu- 
mms and bureaus of information/sample houses, consular reports 
fee.) II. ; M., W., F.; 3; (3). Professor Fisk. 

Bequired: Economics 1, 7 and 26. [Not given in 1904-5.] 

30. History of the Commercial Policy of the United 
rATES.-An historical study of all those measures, such as tariff 
gislation, commercial treaties, navigation laws, bounties, sub- 



38 

sidies, consular matters, etc., which have an important bearing 
on the commercial side of the foreign relations of the United 
States. I., II.; M., W., 3; (2). Professor Fisk. 
Bequired; Economics 1, 7, or 22 and 26. 

31. History of the Commercial Relations of the 
United States. I., II.; M., W.; 4; (2). Professor Fisk. 

Bequired: Economics 30. 

32. Domestic and Foreign Markets of the United 
States.— One hour a week is devoted to a study of the distribu- 
tion and domestic marketing of American products, especially 
farm products, while the second hour is given to a study of for- 
eign markets for American exports. I., II.; W., F.; 4; (2). Pro- 
fessor Fisk. 

Bequired: Economics 28, 29; or 27, 30. 

33. Economics of Insurance. — The historical develop- 
ment of insurance, and an extended discussion of its economic 
aspects. The various forms of insurance— fire, accident, employ- 
ment and life,— from the standpoint of internal organization and 
from that of social service. Rates, policies, investments, corpor- 
ate management, accounting, public supervision, and insurance 
law. I.; arrange time; (2). Professor Robinson. 

Bequired: Economics 10, 24. 

34. Corporation Accounting.— The general principles ofj 
accounting and auditing in modern business. The report oil 
railway, banking and industrial corporations are analyzed. The! 
work is supplemented with a series of lectures by practical acJ 
countants. II.; Tu., Th.; 3; (2). Professor Robinson. 

Bequired: Economics 10. 

35. Consular and Diplomatic Service.— A comparative! 
study of the consular service of the important countries, and oil 
the diplomatic service so far as it affects foreign commerceJ 
Special attention is given to the foreign service of the United 
States. I., II.; F.; 4; (1). Professor Fisk. 

Bequired: Economics 30 and 31. 

courses for graduates 

101. Recent Economic Theory.— For the year 1904-05, 
Theories of Wages and Profits is the subject of study. I., II.: 
arrange time. Professor Kinley. 

102. Historical and Comparative Finance.— This course! 



39 



is devoted to original investigation by the student and to reports 
and discussion in class, supplemented with lectures by the in- 
structor. The work is conducted each year along the following 
lines. (1) A comparison of financial theories concerning public 
expenditures, the principles of justice in taxation, the incidence 
of taxes and the relation of taxation to social reform; (2) a com- 
parison to the financial system of the United States with those 
of foreign countries; (3) a comparison of the taxing systems of 
the American commonwealths. For 1904-05 the last named sub- 
ject has been selected. I., II.; arrange time; (2). Assistant Pro- 
fessor Hammond. 

103. Seminary in Kailway Administration.— Advanced 
students in this subject make a detailed study of one of the 
branches of railway administration. I., II.; arrange time; (2) 
Professor Eobinson. 

104. Seminary in Commerce.— A study of present inter- 
national commercial relations, with special reference to the trade 
conditions of the United States and the extension of her trade 
to foreign markets. I., II.; arrange time; (2). Professor Fisk. 

EDUCATION 

Under the direction of this department are offered the 
pedagogical and the psychological courses included within 
the University curriculum. In both of these fields of 
study the department is well equipped for graduate in- 
struction. The University Library, besides containing the 
files of nearly all the important serial publications in each, 
is well provided with the general and technical works 
which are essential to advanced study. Besides this, the 
department possesses a pedagogical library of upwards of 
1,000 volumes and 5,000 reports, courses of study, etc., 
covering the general field of education which provides an 
invaluable field for the investigation of problems of school 
organization and administration. For work in psychology 
there is a laboratory, adequate for present needs, consist- 
ing of three rooms (beside a dark room) fully equipped 
with apparatus both for elementary instruction and for 



40 



the prosecution of research within the field of psychology. 
Although the department has no mechanician of its own, it 
has a well furnished work-shop in which the more simple 
pieces of apparatus for special investigation may be con- 
structed and through arrangements with the shops of the 
College of Engineering the more elaborate ones are built. 

Matriculants for major work either in pedagogical or 
psychological courses are supposed to have had at least 
one year's previous study in them. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

A. Pedagogical. 

4. Contemporary Educational Conditions and Move- 
ments in the United States. I ; (2). Professor Dexter. 

5. A Comparative Study of the Secondary School 
Systems of France, Germany, England, and America. 
II; (2) Professor Dexter. 

6. High School Organization and Management. II.; (3) 

7. Special Methods in Science and Mathematics. I., (2) 

8. Special Methods in Language and History. I.; (2) 
Assistant Professor Colvin. 

9. Educational Psychology. II.; (2). Professor Dexter. 

10. Seminar, Covering General Problems in School 
Management and Supervision. I., II.; (1). Professor Dexter. 

B. Psychological. 

3 and 4. Experimental Psychology.— A full laboratory 
course for the year. I., II.; (5). Professor Dexter and Assistant 
Professor Colvin. 

5. Genetic Psychology. II.; (2). Assistant Professor Col- 
vin. 

6. Comparative Psychology. I.; (2). Assistant Professor 
Colvin. 

7. Seminar. L, II.; (1); Assistant Professor Colvin. 

8. The Psychology of the Emotions and the Will. II,; 
(2). Assistant Professor Colvin. 



41 

No courses strictly for graduate students are announced 
by the department, but arrangements are made with such 
students individually and such courses arranged as meet 
the particular needs. University credit varying in amount 
from one to five semester hours is given for this work. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 
The library contains all the principal journals devoted 
to English philology and many society transactions and 
other special publications together with complete sets of 
most of the standard English periodicals of the nineteenth 
century. A portion of the department library fund is re- 
served for buying special material for advanced students. 
At least three years of college work in English is re- 
quired for major work in this subject. Students who have 
not had one year of Old English (Anglo Saxon) must 
elect English 8. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

5. Shakespeare and the History of the Drama. L, 
II.; (3). Professor Dodge. 

6. English Criticism in the Nineteenth Century. I., 
II.; (2). Mr. Paul. 

7. English Fiction in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth 
Centuries. L, II.; (2). Associate Professor Jayne. 

8. Old English (Anglo Saxon) Prose. I., II.; (3). Pro- 
fessor Dodge. 

15. Methods of Teaching English Literature. I., II.; 
(1). Professor Dodge, Associate Professor Jayne, Assistant 
Professor Baldwin, Mr. Paul. 

19. The Literary Study of the Bible. 1., II.; (3). As- 
sistant Professor Baldwin. 

24. Browning.— Rapid critical reading of the poems. 1.; (3). 
Miss Kyle. 

25. Chaucer.— Critical reading of the principal poems. I.; 
(2). Professor Dodge. 

26. English Ballads. II.; (2). Professor Dodge. 



42 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES 



101. Research Course in Sixteenth Century Litera- 
ture.— Professor Dodge and Assistant Professor Baldwin. 

102. Research Course in Eighteenth Century Writers. 
—Professor Dodge and Associate Professor Jayne. 

103. Research Course in Nineteenth Century Writers. 
—Associate Professor Jayne and Mr. Paul. 

GERMAN 

Courses in German primarily for graduates include 
courses in Old and Middle High German and a seminary 
for training independent literary investigation. These 
are supplemented by the more advanced of those courses 
which are primarity for undergraduates. 

The Library is well equipped with works in German lit- 
erature, especially of the classical and modern periods. 
It contains also complete files of the most important per- 
iodicals. 

Graduate students whose major is German must have 
had at least three years of University German or its equiv- 
alent. They must take courses 101, 102, 103, and in ad- 
dition six semester hours from among courses 8, 9, 25, 
and 27. For further work, any of the other courses de- 
scribed below, are open to graduate students. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

7. Heine's Prose; German Lyrics.— Eapid translation and 
sight reading of selections from Heine's Prose; study of lyric 
verse using as a guide Hatfields's German Lyrics and 
Ballads. L; M., W., F.; (3). Assistant Professor Meyer. 

8. Schiller.— The life of Schiller, and study of Wallenstein 
and other selections. L; Tu., Th.; 3; (2). Assistant Professor 
Brooks. 

9. Goethe's Faust.— Part I, and portions of part II. I.; M., 
W., F., 3; (3). Assistant Professor Meyer. 

10. Goethe.— The life of Goethe, and study of selections 



43 

from his lyrics, classical dramas, and prose works, II.; M., W., 
F.; 7; (3). Assistant Professor Meyer. 

11. History of Modern German Literature.— Lectures, 
recitations, and reports on assigned collateral reading. II. ; Tu., 
Th.; 7; (22). Assistant Professor Brooks. 

12. Eecent and Contemporary Prose Fiction.— Rapid 
reading of works by Freytag, Dahn, Keller, Heyse, Sudermann, 
and others. I.; Tu., Th.; 7; (2). Assistant Professor Brooks. 

23. The Romantic School.— Rapid translation and sight 
reading; reports on assigned reading. I.; M., W., F.; 4; (3). Miss 
Blaisdell. 

24. Recent and Contemporary Drama. — Study of Dramas 
by Heyse, Hauptmann, Wilbrandt, Fulda, Sudermann, and oth- 
ers. II.; M., W., F.; 4; (3). Assistant Professor Brooks. 

25. Teachers' Course. — Lectures, discussion of methods, 
examination of text-books. II.; Tu.; 7; (1). Assistant Professor 
Meyer. 

26. German Literature Before the Reformation. — 
Lectures, recitations and reports on assigned reading; the course 
is intended to cover the period not included in course 11, and 
students who intend to take course 11, are advised to elect course 
26. I.: Tu.; 8; (1). Assistant Professor Brooks. 

27. Lessing. — The life of Lessing, and study of Nathan der 
Weise and other selections. II.; M., W., F.; 3; (3). Assistant 
Professor Meyer. 

courses for graduates 

101. Introduction to Middle High German.— I.; M., W., 
F.; 8; 3. Assistant Professor Brooks. 

102. Old High German and Elements of Historical 
Grammar.— II.; Tu.; Th.; 8; (2). Assistant Professor Brooks. 

103. Seminary in Modern German Literature.— I. or 
II.; (2). Assistant Professor Meyer. 

GREEK 
The undergraduate courses offered in the Catalog con- 
stitute about six years' work. For registration with 
Greek as a graduate major, at least the first four years, or 
their equivalent, and an approved bachelor's degree are 
required. 



44 

Graduate minor courses are offered upon arrangement 
as follows: (a) the History of Classical Philology; (b) Gen- 
eral Introduction to the Science of Language; (c) the Pri- 
vate and Public Life of the Greek People. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

9. Greek Oratory.— I.; M., W., F.; 4; (3). Professor Moss. 
Bequired: Greek 8. 

10. Greek Tragedy.— I.; Tu., Th.; 2; (2). Professor Moss. 
Bequired: Greek 8. 

11. Homer.— The Iliad.— II.; M., W., F.; 4; (3). Professor 
Moss. 

Bequired: Greek 8. 

12. Thucydides.— II.; Tu., Th.; 4; (2). Professor Moss. 
Bequired: Greek 8. 

HISTORY 
With a view to offering opportunities for advanced work 
with the sources, the documentary collections of the 
University Library have been greatty strengthened. The 
following complete, or nearly complete, collection of 
source-material may be specialty noted: 

American History.— The records of debates in Congress in 
their various forms from 1789 to the present time; the Journals 
and Secret Journals of the Continental Congress before 1789; the 
American State Papers, and the congressional documents or re- 
ports; the U. S. Statutes at Large; The U. S. Supreme Court re- 
ports; the colonial statutes of Massachusetts, New York, Penn- 
sylvania, and Virginia; the legislative and judicial documents of 
Illinois; the collected writings, usually in the latest editions, of 
most of the "Fathers of the Republic" and of many of the late 
statesmen. 

English History.— The Statutes oftheBealm; House of Com- 
mons, Journals; Cabbeth, Parliamentary History and Hanson, 
Parliamentary Debates; the Annual Begister; Pickering, Statutes r at 
Large. The resources of the University Library are supplemented 
by those of the Champaign City Library which contains the 
books on western history, collected by the late Edward G. Mason, 
President of the Chicago Historical Society. 



45 

Though it is impossible to draw a hard and fast line be- 
tween advanced undergraduate and graduate work, can- 
didates for advanced degrees, with history as a major, 
must have had at least two years of undergraduate work 
in this subject. Work in the related social science will be 
accepted in partial substitution for that required in history. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

4. English Constitutional History.— I., II.; M., W., F.; 
2; (3). Assistant Professor Schoolcraft. 

8. The Empire and the Papacy in the Middle Ages. 
—The conflict of churcli and state. I., II. ; M., W., F. Mr. 
Alvord. 

9. The Period of the Italian Eenaissance. — I.; Tu., 
Th.; 7; (3). Mr. Alvord. 

10. The Development of the British Colonial Empire. 
—I.; M., W., F., 2; (3). Assistant Professor Schoolcraft. [Not 
given in 1904-05]. 

11. The Political History of Europe in the Nineteenth 
Century.— Professor Greene. 

13. The Political and Constitutional History of the 
English Colonies in America.— Professor Greene. 

14. The Constitutional History of the United States, 
1775-1860.— Professor Greene. 

15. The Political and Constitutional History of the 
United States since I860.— Professor Greene. 

101. The Seminary in American History. — Professor 
Greene. 

102. The Seminary in English History.— Assistant Pro- 
fessor Schoolcraft. 

Attention is also called to the courses in economic and 
financial history offered by the Department of Economics. 

LATIN 
Professor Barton 
The work offered pre-supposes the usual four years' 
preparatory course and three years of regular college 



46 



work. The intensive study of one of the masterpieces of 
golden or silver Latin will be the basis of the work, sup- 
plemented by the study of the Roman novel as found in 
Petronius and Apuleius. Ansonius and Claudianus will 
also be considered. Historical Latin Grammar and the 
private life of the Romans are included in these require- 
ments for the degree of Master of Arts. 

PHILOSOPHY 

One year's graduate work may, at present, be done in 
this department. In addition to the courses in philoso- 
phy, the student must select, under the guidance of the 
head of the department of philosophy, advanced courses 
in psychology, sufficient to complete a full course of study 
for the year. 

The minimum preparation required for admission is a 
year's work in both psychology and philosophy. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

5. Advanced Philosophy.— The seventeenth century phi- 
losophy. A critical study of Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibnitz. 
I.; Tu., Th.; 7; (2). Professor Daniels. [Not given in 1904-5]. 

Bequired: Two semesters in Philosophy of Psychology. 

10. Philosophic Thought in English Literature of 
the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries.— I.; Tu., Th.; 
8; (1). Professor Daniels. 

11. Philosophy of Religion.— The philosophical interpre- 
tation of religious consciousness, with reference to the value of 
a rational view of religious ideas. Open to seniors and graduate 
students only. I., II.; Tu., 7; (1). Professor Daniels. 

12. The Philosophy of Herbert Spencer. — A critical 
study of his First Principles and Data of Ethics. The influence 
of the theory of evolution upon modern philosophy. Open to 
seniors and graduate students only. I.; W., F.; 8; (2). Professo'r 
Daniels. 

13. Philosophy of Nature.— The study of scientific con- 
ceptions from the philosophic point of view. Man's place in 



47 

nature. The relation of mind and body. A critical study of 
selections from the writings of Clifford, Pearson, Ostwald, and 
other writers. Open to senior and graduate students only. II.; 
Tu., Th.; 8; (2). Professor Daniels. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

101. The Philosophy of Kant. 

ROMANIC LANGUAGES 
Graduate students are given ample opportunities to pur- 
sue advanced work in the Romanic Languages. The Uni- 
versity Library contains a valuable collection of books in 
these subjects, including back files of the leading periodi- 
cals treating of French Literature and Romanic Philol- 
ogy. Additions are constantly being made, and special 
needs of graduate students will be met so far as possible. 
The minimum requirement of work previously done is 
three years of French. To this it is desirable to add 
courses in Spanish and Italian. In the higher courses in- 
tended primarily for undergraduates, additional require- 
ments are made for graduates. The undergraduate courses 
in Italian and Spanish may be taken as graduate minors. 

Prospective teachers of the Romanic Languages should 
take up the study of the history and development of these 
tongues. Such study is required of all candidates for the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Romanic Languages. 
It is strongly recommended to all candidates for the de- 
gree of Master of Arts in this subject. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

3. Advanced French Prose Composition and Conver- 
sation.— This course may be taken alone, or, more profitably, 
with any other course. It is especially designed for students in 
the courses in business training, and for those intending to teach 
French. I. II.; Tu., Th.; 2; (2). Professor Oliver. 



48 



4. Nineteenth Century.— A general course on the ro- 
mantic and realistic novel and drama. Lyric poetry forms also 
an important share of the work. Modern tendencies are dis- 
cussed. Lectures, themes, and collateral reading. I., II.; M., 
W., F.; 2; (3). Mr. Hamilton. [Not given in 1904-5]. 

5. The Eomantic School. — Kise, development and decline 
of Romanticism in French literature with readings from all rep- 
resentative authors. During the latter part of the year, the 
characteristics of realism are discussed, and a few productions of 
the realistic school are read. I., II.; M., Vf., F.; 2: (3). Mr. 
Hamilton. 

7. Molieke.— Study of the life and times of Moliere with 
reading of the greatest comedies. I.; Tu., Th.; 2; (2). Mr. 
Hamilton. [Not open to students who have taken French 10]. 

8. Tragedy of the Classic School.— Rise, development 
and decline of Classic Tragedy as seen in the works of Corneille, 
Racine, and Voltaire. II.; Tu., Th.; 2; (2). Mr. Hamilton. 
[Not open to students who have taken French 10]. 

9. Non-dramatic Literature of the Seventeenth Cen- 
tury. — Lectures on the culture and society of France in the sev- 
enteenth century as expressed in literature not dramatic. The 
great moralists and philosophers. Memoirs and letters. The 
Art Poetique and the Satires of Boileau. The fables of La Fon- 
taine. I., II.; M., W., F.; 4: (3). Professor Oliver. 

10. Seventeenth Century Drama.— Lectures on the rise 
and development of French Classic Drama with especial refer- 
ence to the society of France during this period. Interpreta- 
tion of the greater masterpieces of Corneille, Eacine, Moliere 
and the secondary dramatists. Collateral reading and themes. I., 
II.; M., W., F.: 4; (3). Professor Oliver. [Not given in 1904-5]. 

Required: "Twenty hours" credit exclusive of French 7 
and 8. 

11. Lyric Poetry of France.— The chief emphasis is laid 
upon Victor Hugo, but poets previous to him are also studied as 
well as his chief contemporaries and successors. The principles 
of French versification particularly as exemplified in Hugo and 
other Romantic writers are studied. I., II.; Tu., Th.; 3; (2). Dr. 
Jones. 



49 



12. Realistic Fiction. — Taking Balzac as its center this 
course treats in detail the development of French realistic fic- 
tion. L, II. ; Tu., Th.; 3; (2). Dr. Jones. [Not given in 1904-5]. 

13. Non-Dramatic Literature of the Eighteenth Cen- 
tury. — Lectures on the society and culture of the eighteenth 
century. Break-up of the ideals of Classicism. Growth of the 
^Revolutionary spirit. First movements toward Bomanticism. 
Montesquieu, Yoltaire and the Encyclopedists. Bousseau, Dide- 
rot, Le Sage, and the writers of the Be volution. I., II., M., W., 
F.; 4; (3). Professor Oliver. [Not given in 1904-5]. 

14. The Drama of the Eighteenth and Nineteenth 
Centuries. — The decadence of Classic Drama: —Voltaire— Cre- 
billon. Bise and growth of the drame bourgeois, the Bomantic 
drama and the realistic drama. Modern tendencies. The chief 
works of Beaumarchais, Marivaux, Hugo, Musset, Scribe, Dumas 
pere, Augier, Dumas fils, Sardou, Coppee, Becque, Hervieu, Bos- 
tand, Brieux. Collateral reading with essays. I., II.; M., W., 
F.; 4; (3). Professor Oliver. [Not given in 1904-5]. 

courses for graduates 

101. The Sixteenth Century.— The Beformation and the 
Benaissance. Babelais, Calvin, Marot, Bonsard, and the Plei- 
ade, Montaigne. Beadings from Darmsteter and Hatzf eld's "Le 
Seizieme Siecle en France". Study of the language and syntax 
of the period. I. ; (3). Arrange time. Professor Oliver. 

102. French Historical Grammar.— Phonetics morphol- 
ogy, syntax. Illustrative readings from Old French texts. I., 
II.; (3). Arrange time. Professor Oliver. 

103. History of Old French Literature.— With represen- 
tative readings from Bartsch's Chrestomathie, La Chanson de 
Boland, Chrestien de Troyes and other works. The Medieval 
drama. I., II.; (3). Arrange time. Professor Oliver. 

104. Comparative Historical Grammar of the Bomanic 
languages with especial reference to Old French and Provencal. 
—Illustrative readings. I., II.; (3). Arrange time. Professor 
Oliver. 



50 

SUBJECTS OF THE COLLEGE OF SCIENCE 

BOTANY 

Professor Burrill and Assistant Professor Hottes 

Graduate botanical studies may be pursued in several 
lines for which the facilities of the laboratories are ample 
and the opportunities are in every way sufficient to meet 
the needs of advanced workers in plant histology, phys- 
iology, physiological cytology, pathology, morphology, 
ecology, and bacteriology. 

The undergraduate courses are numbered from 1 to 12 
and carry credits aggregating 60 semester hours or five 
full years' work. Course 11 is a general introductory one 
of 5 "hours," (one semester) open without other restrict- 
ions than the University entrance requirements, to all 
matriculated students. Zoology 10 is a similar introduc- 
tory course of 5 "hours" and these together, or their equiv- 
alent, one year of biological work, constitute a minimum 
pre-requisite for minor graduate registration. Courses 1 
to 10 are therefore open to graduates as minor subjects. 
Courses 1 and 2, following 11, cover one year, and these 
or their equivalent are required for major graduate credit. 
Courses 3 to 10 inclusive may be approved, with any 
additions specified in individual cases, for major graduate 
work towards a master's degree. Registration for a doc- 
tor's degree may be accepted on the same basis, but in this 
case study must be so specialized as early to permit effect- 
ive research. Those having sufficient preparation will be 
enrolled at once for major work in one or more of the 
courses marked for graduates. These are research courses 
and the work is adapted to the special purposes or require- 
ments of each investigator. 

The collections in the Herbarium are in convenient order 
for reference and include materials for research in several 



51 

subjects. Of fungi there are over 30,000 mounted spec- 
imens together with a large amount of duplicate material. 

3. Cytology and Physiology. — Mostly laboratory work 
and assigned reading. The course extends through the year, but 
the work of each semester may be credited separately under the 
designations of 3a and 3b. The first semester is devoted mainly 
to cytology and histology, with special attention to technique; 
during the second semester experimental physiology receives 
chief attention. I., II.; 3, 4: (5). Assistant Professor Hottes. 

Bequired: Botany 1. 

4. Taxonomy of Special Groups. — Mostly laboratory and 
herbarium work, and assigned reading. Field excursions are re- 
quired. The course extends through the year, but the work of 
each semester may be credited separately under the designations 
of 4a and 4b. The first semester is devoted mainly to sperma- 
phytes, the second to sporophytes. L, II.; 1, 2; (5). Professor 
Burrill. 

Bequired: Botany 2. 

5. Bacteriology. — An introduction to the knowledge of 
the subject and instruction in methods. II.; 3, 4; (5). Pro- 
fessor Burrill and Miss Latzer. 

Bequired: Chemistry 1, and at least one semester's work in 
botany or zoology, in the University. 

7. Plant Pathology. — Diseases and injuries of plants. 
Mostly laboratory, herbarium, and field work, and assigned read- 
ing. I.; M., W., F; 1, 2; (3). Professor Burrill. 

Bequired: Botany 1, 2. 

9. Investigations and Thesis. — Research work upon se- 
lected subjects. Special arrangements for this work should be 
made during the preceding year. I., II.; arrange time-, (5). Pro- 
fessor Burrill and Assistant Professor Hottes. 

Bequired: Botany 1, 2, and at least one year from 3, 4, 5, 7. 

10. Seminary. — Reports and discussions upon assigned top- 
ics and results of research work. For advanced and graduate 
students. I. II.; F.; arrange time. (1). Professor Burrill. 

courses for graduates 

101. Biological Botany. — The preparation and study of 
material by histological and embryological methods, and exper- 



52 



iment work with living vegetation in the laboratory and field in 
working out special problems in the development, physiology, 
and pathology of plants. Assistant Professor Hottes. 

102. Systematic Botany. — Critical and comparative stud- 
ies of species included in chosen groups of spermaphytes or spor- 
ophytes, or from selected geographic areas, in connection with 
considerations of genealogic development, geographic distribu- 
tion, and interrelated association. Professor Burrill. 

103. Bacteriology. — Investigations upon morphologic and 
physiologic variation due to treatment; systematic studies upon 
the aumber, validity, and relationship of species, researches upon 
special saprophytic or parasitic kinds of bacteria and upon meth- 
ods of favoring or com bating their activities. Professor Btjrrill. 

104. Evolution of Plants. — Observations and experi- 
ments upon plants and studies in related literature, in gaining 
information upon such topics as the following: The influence 
of environment, effects of self and cross fertilization, tendencies 
of variation, philosophy of selection, nature and laws of heredity. 
Professor Btjrrill and Assistant Professor Hottes. 

CHEMISTRY 
Special opportunities and facilities are afforded prop- 
erly prepared students, to undertake graduate work in all 
lines of pure and applied chemistry. The commodious, 
new chemical building, with its large laboratories and 
separate research rooms is well equipped for graduate 
work in inorganic, organic, physical, agricultural, and ap- 
plied chemistry. In combination with certain engineer- 
ing courses special facilities are available to students 
wishing to do graduate work in electro-chemistry and in 
chemical engineering. The requirement for major gradu- 
ate work in the Departments of Chemistry is the bacca- 
laureate degree of this University or its full equivalent. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

101. Organic Chemistry. — Special investigations in the al- 
iphatic or in the aromatic series. Associate Professor Grindley 
and Dr. Dehn. 



53 



102. Inorganic Chemistry. — Kesearch work in general inor- 
ganic chemistry, including the critical and constructive study 
of methods of analysis, both quantitative and qualitative. Pro- 
fessor Parr, Associate Professor Grindley, and Dr. Lincoln. 

103. Physical Chemistry. — Investigation of special prob- 
lems, including thermo-chemical research. Dr. Lincoln. 

104. Chemistry of Foods. — Investigations of the composi- 
tion, fuel value, digestibility, and dietary value of foods, and 
the chemical changes involved in cooking. Associate Professor 
Grindley t . 

105. Agricultural Chemistry. — Special investigations in 
the field of agricultural chemistry, including the chemistry of 
plants, foods, soils, and rain, drain, and ground waters. Associ- 
ate Professor Grindley and 

106. Research in Metallurgical Chemistry.— (a) Action 
of solvents in extraction of gold and silver from their ores, (b) 
Methods of analysis of ores and products. Professor Parr. 

107. Investigation or Water Supplies.— In connection 
with State Water Survey. Mr. Stark. 

108. Investigation of Fuels— 

(a) Heating power, calorimetric methods. 

(b) Adaptation of bituminous coal to gas manufacture, 
purification of products. 

(c) Coke and by-products. 

Professor Parr. 

109. Special Problems in Industrial Chemistry.— 

(a) Corrosion and scaling of steam boilers. 

(b) Purification of feed water. 

(c) Cements and mortars. 

(d) Paints and pigments. 

Professor Parr. 

GEOLOGY 
The undergraduate courses offered in this department 
cover a wide field. Each of the semester courses, miner- 
alogy (Geol. 5), general geology as taken by chemists, or 
as taken by general science students (Geol. 1), agricultural 
geology (Geol. 12), engineering geology (Geol. 13), or 
physical geography (Geol. 8), looks toward, and is pre- 



54 

paratory for a different line of advanced work. The 
equipment of the department enables us to offer excellent 
facilities for advanced study along each of these lines. 

To the agriculturist there is offered studies in the miner- 
alogical composition of soils carried on by the use of the 
microscope and other optical agencies; in mineral and rock 
decomposition; and in meteorology: to the engineer and 
chemist, studies in the characteristics, origin and methods 
of deposition of all useful minerals, together with the uses 
which are made of them; in the testing of mineral sub- 
stances used in the manufacture of structural materials, by 
physical methods; in mineral synthesis; and in petrography; 
to the biologist, studies in paleontology, using our unus- 
ually large collection of paleozoic forms; inorganic evolu- 
tion from the standpoint of the geologist; and in the 
distribution of organisms as affected by geographic in- 
fluences: to the teacher, studies in the geologj r and physical 
geography of selected regions with special reference to 
their influence on the welfare of mankind; and of methods 
for observational and laboratory work in these subjects 
which are best adapted to the needs of students in second- 
ary schools: to the student of general science such selection 
from the above as will best promote the object he has in 
view. 

At least one semester of apporpriate introductory work, 
as offered in University courses, or the equivalent, is re- 
quired for graduate registration. The courses open to 
undergraduates may be taken for minor graduate credit, 
or with approved additions, for major work. 

2. Economic Geology.— A study of the uses man may make 
of geologic materials; of the conditions under which they occur, 
and those under which they were formed; and of the qualities 
which make them valuable. Keadings, conferences, and labora- 
tory work. 



55 



Each student may select one or more of the subjects indica- 
ted below and devote so much time to it as may seem desirable 
or profitable. The proportion of time devoted to reading, confer- 
ence and laboratory will of course vary with the nature of the 
subject chosen. The laboratory affords facilities for making the 
work thoroughly practical. 

Ores and ore deposits, useful minerals other than ores, min- 
eral synthesis, petrographic studies, properties of clays which fit 
them for various uses, properties of lime and cement-making 
materials; properties of building stones; rock-flours and their 
uses, origin, and uses of road metals, studies of ornamental 
stones, coals and coal basins, hydrographic studies, etc., either, 
or both semesters, (2, 3, or 5). Professor Wolfe, Mr. Fox, and 
Mr. Matson. 

4. Investigations.— Students desiring to take advanced work 
in any department of dynamic or historical geology, in mineral- 
ogy or in physical geography may, with approval, select a 
subject for investigation and receive such guidance and help as 
may be necessary. Eeadings, conferences, laboratory and field 
work are apportioned according to the nature of the subject. The 
work is individual, and the student is expected to show results. 
Either semester: (3 or 5). Professor Eolfe, Mr. Fox, and Mr. 
Matson. 

6. Advanced Crystallography.— During the first part of 
the semester a detailed study of the forms of crystals, their 
combinations and abnormalties is made. Later the student 
learns to measure the facial angles of crystals with the contact 
and reflecting goniometers and by mathematical calculations to 
determine the species. I. Tu., Th.; 3-4; (2). Professor Eolfe, 
and Mr. Fox. 

7. Optical Mineralogy.— The student is first made ac- 
quainted with the peculiarities of the petrographic microscope, 
and of the behavior of minerals in thin section in parallel and 
convergent light. He then places thin sections of minerals and 
rocks under the microscope and learns to determine their species 
and the changes which are taking place in them by their effect 
on transmitted light. I.; M., W., F. 3-4; (3). Professor Eolfe, 
and Mr. Fox. 

9. Advanced Paleontology. — This course includes (a) dis- 
cussion of the biological relations of fossils form along the lines 



56 



indicated in Williams' Geological Biology: (b) discussion of the 
principles of classification as applied to fossils, together with 
the characteristics which distinguish the larger groups, using 
"Nicholsom, Bernard, and Zitti as guides; (c) study of the distri- 
bution and variations of the genera and species of one or more of 
the important groups as illustrated by the collections of the 
University. Either semester; 3-4; (5). Professor Rolfe, Mr. 
Fox, and Mr. Matson. 

10. Teacher's Courses in Physical Geography.— This 
course is designed primarily for those who expect to teach. The 
work includes discussions of the most approved methods of pre- 
senting each topic in class room, field, and laboratory, and the 
use which can be made of local geography, topography and geol- 
ogy together with the fauna and flora as illustrative material. 
It also includes the selection of topographic sheets issued by the 
United States Geological Survey which show well developed 
topographic types, and their proper use in the class room; the 
manufacture and use of models and all other means by which 
the principles of the science may be experimentally studied. It 
further includes observations on character of cloud, direction 
and velocity of wind, temperature and humidity of the air, and 
their relation to weather changes; the study of weather maps, 
and the constitution and use of simple apparatus for meteoro- 
logical observations. A study is made of the geographic ele- 
ments which have combined to produce the peculiarities of sur- 
face and climate of selected regions and the effect which these 
combinations have had on the historical, commercial and indus- 
trial progress of their inhabitants. I.; arrange time. (5). Pro- 
fessor Bolfe, and Mr. Matson. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

102. Economic Geology.— The laboratories afford facili- 
ties for the study of problems in economic geology by the most 
approved methods. These problems may be approached from 
the geological side only in the laboratories of the department, or 
may be carried on under the joint direction of the departments 
of geology and applied chemistry. Again they may be purely 
laboratory problems, or the student may make an economic sur- 
vey of some assigned area. 

104. Dynamic Geology. — The dynamic problems in Illinois 
geology have scarcely been touched except on the glacial side. 



57 



There are many problems in stream work, pre-glacial drainage, 
tracing moraines of Illinois glaciation, water supply, penepla- 
nation, deserted lake beds, the Ozark ridge, etc., that await 
solution. The University offers excellent facilities for work 
along these lines. 

108. Physical Geography.— Studies in the geography of 
Illinois dealing with the topography, meteorology, climatology, 
and natural products of assigned areas. 

HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE 

The University affords unusual facilities for advanced 
work in this department. The equipment of the depart- 
ment has been carefully selected and much illustrative 
material has been secured. In addition to the laboratories 
of the department, the resources of the library, the inves- 
tigations of the well equipped science laboratories, the 
researches of the department of economics, are available 
for the use of the student. 

At least one year of acceptable household science work 
is required for graduate registration. Courses open to 
undergraduates will have additions for graduate credit. 

COTJRCES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

4. Chemistry of Food and Nutrition.— Food and nutri- 
tion from the standpoint of sanitary and physiological chemistry. 
Investigations in the study of yeasts; household applications of 
bacteriology; dietaries adapted to different ages, occupations 
and conditions. Bichard and Woodman's Air, Water, and Food; 
Halliburton's Essentials of Chemical Physiology; Government Bulletins, 
L; M., W.; 3., 4.; Tu., Th., F.; 3; (5). Professor Bevier. 

Bequired: Bot. 5. Chem. 1, 3b, 4, 5c, 20; 5 hours in Botany or 
Zoology. 

5. Dietetics and Household Management.— The topics 
considered are: (a) the principles of diet; the relation of food to 
health; the influence of age, sex and occupation; the dietic treat- 
ment of certain diseases; principles of home nursing, (b) The 
organization and care or the household; the processes involved 
in the cleaning of metals, woods, and fabrics; the use of disinfect- 
ants. II. • M., W., F.; 5; (3). Miss Beatty. 

Bequired: Household Science 1, 6. 



58 



6. Economic Uses of Food.— This course is a continuation 
of course 1. Emphasis is put upon the economic side of the food 
question. The uses and applications of preservatives are consid- 
ered. I.; M., W., F.; 1, 2; (3). Miss Beatty. 

Bequired: Household Science 1. 

8. Personal and Public Hygiene.— This course is intended 
to be a popular presentation of the results of late investigations 
in regard to food and sanitation. II.; Tu.; 7; (1). Professor 
Bevier. 

9. Seminary.— Reports and discussions upon assigned topics. 
For advanced students. L, II.; W.; arrange time; (1) Professor 
Bevier. 

101. Home Economics. — A study of the origin and develop- 
ment of Home Economics in its various phases. Particular 
attention is given to its industrial, educational and sociological 
aspects. Professor Bevier. 

102. Special Investigations.— Problems in the application 
of the principles of bacteriology, chemistry and physiology to 
the ordinary processes used in the preparation of food. Professor 
Bevier and Mrs. Sober. 

MATHEMATICS 

The University offers an opportunity for pursuing grad- 
uate work in mathematics for two or three years. The 
minimum requirement for entering upon this work in- 
cludes three years of undergraduate study in the same line. 
It is recommended that students anticipating graduate 
work at this University shall take, in addition to the above 
requirements in mathematics, a year of experimental phys- 
ics and when possible a half year in mechanics. Students 
making their major in mathematics may with profit elect 
at least one of their minors from the allied subjects in en- 
gineering, physics, or astronomy. 

The University Library contains complete sets of the 
leading French, German, English, and American mathe- 
matical journals. It also contains the most important 
collected works and treatises, particularly in the line of 
theory of functions and in geometry. The department is 



59 

supplied with a collection of models for use in geometry 
and in the theory of functions. Research work in these 
two lines is amply provided for. In connection with the 
preparation of a thesis, all graduate students in mathemat- 
ics are required to be members of the mathematical 
seminar (Math. 15) where the results of their investigations 
are presented and discussed. 

Aside from the following courses, which are regularly 
offered to advanced undergraduates, work will be given in 
continuous groups, and definite integrals, if the demand 
for these subjects seems to warrant it. 

12. Theory of Invariants.— The general development of 
the theory of invariants, both from the geometric and from the 
algebraic side. Applications of invariants to systems of conies 
and higher plain curves. L; M., W., F.; 7; (3). Dr. Rietz. 

Bequired: Mathematics 8b (or 9), 11. 

13a. Functions of Real Variables.— The two courses in 
functions (13a , 13b) are a continuation of the work done in cal- 
culus (8a, 8b, or 7, 9). Under functions of real variables, consid- 
erable attention is given to the fundamental ideas of the analysis, 
including rational and irrational numbers, mengelehre, single 
and double limits and their application to questions of continuity 
of functions of one and two variables, uniform convergence of 
series, etc. The existence of derivities, condensation of singu- 
larities, definite integrals, differentiation and integration of 
series are also discussed. L, II.; M., W., F.; 8; (3). Associate 
Professor Townsend. 

Bequired: Mathematics 8a, 8b, (or 7, 9,) 10. 

13b. Functions of a Complex Variable.— A general in- 
troduction to the theory of functions of a complex variable. 
The methods of Weierstrass and Riemann are followed. I., II.; 
M., W., F.; 8; (3). Associate Professor Townsend. 

Bequired: Mathematics 8a, 8b (or 7,9,) 10. 

14. Method of Least Squares. — The fundamental princi- 
ples of the subject. The following subjects are studied: Law 
of probability and error, adjustment of observations, precision 
of observations, independent and conditional observations, etc. 
I.; Tu., Th.; 6; (2). Dr. Stebbins. 

Bequired: Mathematics 8a, or 9. 



60 



15. Seminary and Thesis.— I., II.; Tu., Th.; 8; (3). Asso- 
ciate Professor Townsend. 

18. Higher Plane Curves.— This course includes the gen- 
eral theory of algebraic curves, together with the application of 
the theory of invariants to higher plane curves. Special study 
is made of curves of the third and fourth order. II. ; M., W., F.; 
7; (3). Dr. Eietz. 

Bequired: Mathematics 12. 

20. Calculus of Variations.— This course has for its aim 
merely to acquaint the student with those elements of the 
science which are most needed in the study of the higher subjects 
of mathematical astronomy and physics. II.; M., W., F.; 4; (3). 
Professor Shattuck. 

Bequired: Mathematics 11, 16. 

21. Spherical Harmonics.— This course is introduced by a 
short course of lectures and study of certain trigonometric series. 
Fourier's Theorem for developing any function of a variable in a 
series proceeding in sines and cosines of multiples of the var- 
iable is derived and the limitations of its validity investigated. 
This is followed by the study of Lagrange's, Laplace's, and 
Lame's functions and their applications to astronomical and 
physical problem. I.; M., W., F.; 6; (3). Assistant Professor 
Hall or Mr. Brenke. 

Bequired: Mathematics 11, 14, 16. 

22. Potential Function.— The potential function is defined 
and its properties derived and discussed. The potential of var- 
ious bodies, such as wire, a spherical shell, a sphere, ellipsoid of 
revolution, etc., is computed. Poisson's and Laplace's Equations 
are derived and discussed. Green's propositions with kindred 
and similar subjects are considered. II.; M., W., F.; 6; (3). Assist- 
ant Professor Hall or Mr. Brenke. 

Bequired: Mathematics 21. 

23. Modern Geometry.— This course includes, in general, a 
consideration of homogeneous coordinates, duality, descriptive 
and metrical properties of curves, anharmonic ratios, homog- 
raphy, involution, projection, theory of correspondence, etc. I.; 
M., W.,F.; 7; (3). Mr. Coar. 

Bequired: Mathematics 8a or 7, 11. 

24. Algebraic Surfaces.— In this course are considered the 



61 

application of homogeneous coordinates and the theory of invar- 
iants to geometry of three dimensions, and also the general theory 
of surfaces, together with the special properties of surfaces of 
the third and fourth order. II. ; M., W., F.; 7; (3). Mr. Coar. 

Bequired: Mathematics 17, 18. 

25. Partial Differential Equations. — It deals with the 
integration and determination of the integration constants of 
such partial differential equations as arise in the study of such 
subjects as the flow of heat, the vibration of strings, plates, etc., 
and electricity. II. ; Tu., Th.; 7; (2). Associate Professor Town- 
send. 

Bequired: Mathematics 8a or 9, 16. 

PHYSICS 
The advanced work in physics is both experimental and 
theoretical. The Physics Laboratory is equipped with 
the necessities and conveniences for experimental work. 
In addition to the large lecture and laboratory rooms ar- 
ranged for the elementary undergraduate courses, a large 
space on the first floor is conveniently divided into rooms 
for advanced experimental work. These include six rooms 
with heavy masonry piers, a constant temperature room, 
a chemical preparation room, three rooms for spectrum, 
photometric and photographic work, and a well-equipped 
machine shop. The cabinets of the department contain 
fine standard apparatus from the best makers for work in 
the various branches of physics. The equipment for work 
in heat and in electricity and magnetism is especially strong, 
much new apparatus having been added recently. The 
services of a mechanician give means of constructing spec- 
ial apparatus needed for investigational work of graduate 
students and instructors. The literature of physics is 
also available, as the University Library contains not only 
the standard treatises and manuals of reference, but also 
sets of practically all of the English, French, and Ger- 
man journals in physics and the cognate subjects of chem- 
try and mathematics. 



62 

One year of University physics, including laboratory 
courses, and corresponding training in mathematics or 
chemistry, will ordinarily be accepted for admittance to 
graduate work in physics. Courses open to undergradu- 
ates will have additions for graduate credit. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

5. Advanced Experimental Physics.— This includes the 
following separate courses: (5a) Mechanics; (5b) Light; (5c) Elec- 
tricity and Magnetism; (5d) Heat. Each course I. or II. semes- 
ter; time to be arranged: credit to be 2, 3, or 5 hours. Professor 
Carmen and Assistant Professor Knipp. 

5. Theoretical Physics. — This includes five courses on the 
elementary mathematical theory of physics. A knowledge of 
the elementary methods of the calculus is desired. (6a) Me- 
chanics; (6b) Light (Preston's light); (6c) Electricity and Magnet- 
ism (Thomson's Elementary Mathematical Theory); (6d) Heat 
(Preston's Heat): (6e) fluids. Each course 3 or 5 hours' credit. 
Semester and hours to be arranged. Professor Carmen, Assistant 
Professor Knipp, and Dr. Watson. 

7. Investigation of Special Problems.— I. and II.; time 
to be arranged; 3 or 5 hours' credit. Professor Carmen, Assis- 
tant Professor Knipp, and Dr. Watson. 

8. Mathematical Physics. — Semester and fiours to be arranged; 
3 or 5 hours' credit. Professor Carmen. 

courses for graduates 

101. Advanced Physical Measurements and Investiga- 
tion.— This is work in advance of courses 5 and includes the 
experimental work in preparation of a thesis. Both semesters, 
with hours and credit to be arranged. Professor Carmen, Assis- 
tant Professor Knipp, and Dr. Watson. 

102. Mathematical Physics. — Work and hours to be arranged. 
Professor Carmen. 

103. Mathematical Theory of Electricity and Magnet- 
ism for Engineers. Professor Carmen and Assistant Professor 
Knipp. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

The equipment of the laboratory includes a considera- 
ble number of instruments of precision giving facilities of 



63 

research along certain lines as good as can be found in 
the country. Graduates interested in certain problems, 
especially such as are connected with the blood and its 
circulation and respiration, may profitably spend one 
or more years in advanced investigations, in or beyond 
courses described below. 

Registration for major credit requires at least one year 
of undergraduate work in the subject, viz., course 1, or 
an equivalent; but for those who have the requisite train- 
ing in chemistry, physics, and zoology any of the courses 
1, 2, 3, or 5 may be accepted for minor credit. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

2. Advanced Course.— Continuation of Physiology 1 through 
a second year. This course is designed for students who wish to 
get as thorough a training as possible for the study of medicine, 
and who can afford to take the full science course at the Uni- 
versity leading to the B. S. degree. Lectures, assigned reading, 
and experiments in the laboratory conducted by the students 
under the supervision of the instructor. I., II.; daily 3, 4; (5). 
Professor Kemp. 

3. Investigation and Thesis. — Every facility and encour- 
agement, so far as the resources of the laboratory permit, are 
offered to those prepared to avail themselves of these for re- 
searches leading to theses for the bachelor's, master's or doctor's 
degree, or for carrying on original work for publications. 

4. Minor Course. — Especial emphasis is laid upon those facts 
that serve as a basin for practical hygiene, and for helping stu- 
dents to teach physiology in high schools. Lecture demonstra- 
tions, recitations, and laboratory work. Students who have had 
chemistry and zoology in high schools may be admitted to the 
course at the option of the instructor. II.; daily; 7, 8; (5). Pro- 
fessor Kemp. 

Bequired: Chemistry 1, zoology 10. 

5. Special Physiology.— There are here included the fol- 
lowing lines of laboratory work, any one or more of which may 
be pursued independently of the others: (a) The physiology of 
foods, and digestion; (b) the blood, circulation, and respiration; 



64 



(c) the excretions, especially urine analysis; (d) general physiol- 
ogy of nerve and muscle; (e) advanced vertebrate, especially 
human, histology. This course may be taken after physiology 4, 
and is recommended for those who wish to work a year in physi- 
ology without having the requirements to enter the class in 
physiology 1. It may also be taken for less than five credits. 
Work to be arranged after consultation with Professor Kemp. 

ZOOLOGY 

Zoology may be taken as a graduate minor by a student 
who has taken the introductory courses in zoology and 
botany (zoology 10 and botany 11), which together make 
one year's work. It may be taken as a graduate major 
by one who has taken zoology 10 or its equivalent fol- 
lowed by course 1 (invertebrate zoology) or course 2 (ver- 
tebrate zoology and comparative anatomy), one year's col- 
lege work in all. 

The courses hereinafter described may be taken as 
minors or majors for either the master's or the doctor's 
degree. For the master's degree any one of courses 1 to 
9, and 12 to 17 of this list may be counted as a minor, and 
any series of these courses amounting to ten semester hours 
may be taken as a major. Whether or not a research 
course followed by a thesis will be required for the mas- 
ter's degree will depend, in each case, on the undergrad- 
uate work of the candidate, and the approval of the Uni- 
versity Committee on the Graduate School. The course 
leading to the doctor's degree with zoology as a major 
should comprise, as a rule, all the above courses, together 
with a research course of at least one year, the results of 
which are to be embodied in the dissertation. A selection 
of minor courses should be made with reference to the 
candidate's previous studies, and will be subject to the 
approval of the committee on the Graduate School. 

Graduate students in this department have access to the 
important and extensive special libraries and collections 



65 



of the State Laboratory of Natural History, housed in the 
Natural History Building. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

1. Invertebrate Zoology.— This course is largely given to 
the study of common invertebrate animals of Illinois, with spec- 
ial attention to their distribution, habits, life histories, and 
adaptive structures. A few type forms are studied additional to 
those of the elementary course. Field work and its methods are 
included in the course, the work of which is adapted through- 
out to the needs of prospective teachers. L; lecture, M., W., F.; 
4; laboratory, 7 periods; 3 and 4; (5). Professor Forbes and Dr. 
Peters. 

Required: Art and Design 1; an entrance credit in chemistry 
or chemistry 1; zoology 10. 

2. Vertebrate Zoology and Comparative Anatomy.— In 
the laboratory work of this course principal attention will be given 
to the anatomy of Necturus and to anatomical and systematic 
studies of fishes, birds, and mammals, especial reference being 
had to the anatomy of man. The more difficult parts of labora- 
tory technology will be given in this course, which will also con- 
tain lectures on the general theory of organic development as 
illustrated by the doctrine of the descent of man. I.; lecture, 
M., W., F.; 4; laboratory, 7 periods; arrange time; (5). Assistant 
Professor Smith and Dr. Peters. 

Required: The same as for zoology 1. 

3. Vertebrate Embryology. — This course begins with a 
study of the sex cells and a discussion of theories of heredity, 
followed by a consideration of the early stages in the develop- 
ment of the egg. The formation of the vertebrate body is then 
studied in the amphibian, the chick, and the pig. Instruction 
is given in the preparation of embryological material and in 
graphic reconstruction from serial sections. II.; 3, 4. (5). Dr. 
Peters. 

Required: Zoology 2. 

15. Variation and Heredity.— A course of lectures and ref- 
erence reading designed to give a general survey of the results 
obtained by the application of modern statistical methods in the 
study of variation and heredity. A knowledge of the methods is 
acquired from lectures and from exercises in handling data gath- 
ered from various sources. Mendel's principles and the theory 



66 



of mutations are discussed. For accompanying laboratory work 
see 15a. II. ; arrange time; (2). Assistant Professor Smith. 

Bequired: Zoology 10 or 11. 

15a. Statistical Data. — Laboratory work involving the col- 
lection of data suitable for a study of the variations and correla- 
tions of structures in some suitable organism may be elected in 
connection with course 5. The extensive collections of insects, 
fishes, and plankton material in the possession of the state 
Laboratory of Natural History are available for the purposes of 
this course. II.; arrange time; (1 to 3). 

Bequired: Zoology 10 or 11. 

17. Field Zoology. — A course in which the main object will 
be to gain as comprehensive a knowledge as practicable of the 
animal life of a restricted locality. Collection, preservation, and 
identification of the various kinds of animals, together with 
observations on the habits, life histories, and relations to envir- 
onment of selected forms will constitute the major part of the 
work. The phases of the subject receiving most attention will 
vary with the make-up of the class and with the kind of locality 
selected, but in any event the work will be so planned as to make 
it a desirable course for prospective teachers of zoology. The 
organization and management of the work will be such that 
graduate students intending to work subsequently on special 
groups, as plankton forms, annelids, or fishes, can give especial 
attention to such groups, if found desirable. II.; arrange time; 
(3). Assistant Professor Smith. 

Bequired: Zoology 10 or 11, and 1 or 2. 

8. Thesis Investigation.— Candidates for graduation who 
select a zoological subject as a thesis are required to spend three 
hours a day during their senior year in making a detailed inves- 
tigation of the selected topics. While this work is done under 
the general supervision of an instructor, it is in its methods and 
responsibilities essentially original work. I., II.; arrange time; 
(5). Professor Foubes and Assistant Professor Smith. 

Bequired: Two years in zoological courses, including one se- 
mester of zoology 4. 

12. Statistical Zoology. — This course is offered for students 
taking mathematics 26. It includes lectures and reference read- 
ing on the application of statistical methods to biological prob- 
lems. The history of the development of this mode of biological 
investigation, the nature of the problems to which it is applicable 



67 



and some of the results already obtained in the study of varia- 
tions, heredity, distribution and phylogeny are among the topics 
3onsidered. Students taking this course, together with math- 
ematics 26b, ordinarily use for the problems of the latter course, 
zoological data that have been obtained either by their own 
)bservations or from other sources. If desired the combined 
credits of this course and mathematics 26 may be counted as 5 
credits either in zoology or in mathematics. II.; F.; 7; (1 or 5). 
Assistant Professor Smith. 

Bequired: Mathematics 2, 4, 6, 8a, and at least ten hours of 
University work in zoology, or in zoology and entomology. 

14. German Readings.— A study of zoological literature in 
German intended to give technical information and practice of 
iccurate and rapid reading. This course, together with botany 
13, will be accepted instead of German 6 of the prescribed list of 
ill except students in chemistry and chemical engineering. I., 
[I. ; arrange time; (2). Assistant Professor Hottes. 

Bequired: German 4. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

101. Plankton Zoology. — Instruction and practice will be 
riven in modern methods of studying minute forms of aquatic 
ife with the aid of a plankton apparatus and laboratory equip- 
nent. This work includes both a qualitative and a quantitative 
nvestigation of the minute zoological contents of a selected 
)ody of water, carried on systematically through a considerable 
>eriod, and the generalization of the results of such study by the 
nethods peculiar to the planktologist. 

102. Fresh- w r ATER Ichthyology. — The large collections of 
ishes belonging to the University and the State Laboratory of 
Natural History, together with the ichthyological library of the 
atter, are open to students who wish to become acquainted with 
he ichthyological of a fresh-water situation. Both qualitative 
nd quantitative studies of the fishes of a selected body of water 
re made, and papers written presenting the results of personal 
tudies in this field. 

103. Fresh-water and Terrestrial Annelids.— This is 
n application of the methods of the zoological laboratory to the 
tudy of the annelid worms of the land and the inland waters of 
forth America. The description of genera and species, practice 
i drawing for publication, and experimental work on the physiol- 
gy and ecology of selected forms will be included in this course 



68 



SUJBECTS OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
AGEONOMY 

The instruction offered in the department of agronomy 
covers the subjects of soil fertility, soil physics, soil bac- 
teriology, crop production, plant breeding, and farm me- 
chanics. The department is also conducting extensive in- 
vestigations relating to soils and crops. A considerable 
number of advanced students are employed during the 
summer season in connection with soil fertility investiga- 
tions, the detail survey of Illinois soils, experimentation 
with corn and other field crops, etc., their time being 
devoted to study during the winter season. 

The facilities for graduate work include an analytical 
laboratory for analyzing soils, crops, and plant food ma- 
terials, extensive greenhouses erected specifically for 
studying soil fertility by pot cultures, well equipped and 
commodious laboratories for the study of soil physics, 
soil bacteriology, plant breeding and seed testing. Aside 
from the large number of experiment fields which are 
located in many different parts of the state, the de- 
partment is conducting extensive field experiments cov- 
ering about one hundred acres of land on the University 
farm at Urbana, some of which have been in progress for 
nearly thirty years. Besides these regular Experiment 
Station fields, which are made use of in giving instruc- 
tion, there are certain fields which are reserved for stu- 
dent experiments. 

Good instruments are provided for surveying lands in 
working out sj^stems of tile drainage, and two large dab- 
oratories (40 by 116 feet each) are well equipped with the 
various kinds of farm implements including field machin- 
ery, windmills, power spraying machines, gas engines, 
and other power machines and hand tools used on the 



69 

farm. Many students taking advanced work in farm 
mechanics are employed during the summer season as 
machinery experts by different harvesting machine com- 
panies. For registration in major graduate work at least 
two years' undergraduate study in agronomy and the 
requisite special preparation is required. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

7. Special Crops. — A special study of farm crops taken up 
under an agricultural outline— grain crops, root crops, forage 
crops, sugar and fiber crops — their history and distribution over 
the earth, methods of culture, cost of production, consumption 
of products and residues, or by-products. Class work supple- 
mented by practical field work and a study of the results of 
previous experiments, such as detasseling corn, injury to roots 
of corn by cultivation; selection of seeds of farm crops; special 
reference to Illinois conditions. II.; daily: 3, 4.; (5). Mr. Hume. 

Bequired: Agronomy 2, 5, 6. 

8. Field Experiments.— Special work by the students, con- 
ducted in the field. This work consists in testing varieties 
of corn, oats, wheat, potatoes, and other farm crops; methods of 
planting corn, seeding grains, grasses, and other forage crops; 
culture of corn, potatoes, and sugar beats; practice in treating 
oats and wheat for smut, and potatoes for scab, and studying 
the effects upon the crops; combating chinch bugs and other in- 
jurious insects. Other practical experiments may be arranged 
with the instructor. Special opportunities will be given to ad- 
vanced students of high class standing to take up experiments, 
under assignment and direction of the instructor in crop produc- 
tion, on certain large farms in the state, arrangements having 
been made with farm owners or managers for such experiments. 
II.; second half, and summer vacation; daily; arrange time (2|-5). 
Mr. Hume. 

Bequired: Agronomy 7, 12. 

10. Special Problems in Soil Physics.— This work is in- 
tended for students wishing to specialize in the study of the 
physical properties of soils, and includes the determination by 
electrical methods of the temperature, moisture, and soluble 
salt content, of various soils under actual Held conditions; effect 
of different depths of plowing, cultivation, and rolling, on soil 



70 



conditions; effects of different methods of preparing seed beds; 
the physical questions involved in the formation and redemption 
of the so-called "alkali," "barren" or "dead dog" soils, and of 
other peculiar soils of Illinois. II.; or summer vacation; daily; 
arrange time; (2 to 5). Mr. Mosier. 

Bequired: Agronomy 9, and one semester's work in geology. 

13. Investigation of the Fertility of Special Soils.— 
This course is primarily designed to enable the student to 
study the fertility of those special soils in which he may be par- 
ticularly interested, and to become familiar with the correct 
principles and methods of such investigations. It will include 
the determination of the nature and quality of the elements of 
fertility in the soils investigated, the effect upon various crops 
of different fertilizers added to the soils as determined by pot 
cultures, and, where possible, by plot experiments. This work 
will be supplemented by a systematic study of the work of exper- 
iment stations and experimenters along these lines of investiga- 
tion. I., II. ; arrange time; (2 to 5). Professor Hopkins. 

aequired: Agronomy 12. 

16. German Agricultural Readings. — A study of the 
latest agricultural experiments and investigations published in 
the German language, special attention being given to soils and 
crops. The current numbers of German journals of agricultural 
science will be required and used as a text. This course is de- 
signed to give the student a broader knowledge of the recent 
advances in scientific agriculture, and, incidentally, it will aid 
him in making a practical application of a foreign language. It 
is recommended that it be taken after agronomy 12. II.; M., 
W.; 4; (2). Professor Hopkins. 

aequired: Two years' work in German. 

17. Special Work in Farm Mechanics.— Students may ar- 
range for special work in any of the lines covering drainage or 
farm machinery, either in second semester or the summer. 
(2i-5). Mr. Crane. 

courses for graduates 

101. Systems of Soil Investigation; Sources of Error 
and Methods of Control, Interpretation of Results. Pro- 
fessor Hopkins. 

102. The World's Supply of Plant Food Materials, In- 
cluding Methods of Utilization. Professor Hopkins. 



71 



103. Different Systems of Agricultural Practice and 
their Ultimate Effect Upon the Soil. Professor Hopkins. 

104. Drainage Waters; Surface and Sub-Drainage, 
with Special Reference to Soil Fertility. Professor Hop- 
kins. 

105. Detailed Study of Soil Investigations in Progress 
in Illinois. Professor Hopkins. 

106. Soil Types; Methods of Surveying and Mapping.— 
The work may include field practice. Mr. Mosier. 

107. Erosion of Soils by Surface Washing and Methods 
of Prevention. Mr. Mosier. 

108. The Mechanical Composition of Soils: its Influ- 
ence Upon Granulation, Absorption and Retention of 
Moisture, and Other Physical Properties Effecting Crop 
Production. Mr. Mosier. 

109. Experimentation in the Production of Field Crops. 
—The work may include actual practice in planning and con- 
ducting field experiments. Mr. Hume. 

110. Weeds: Advanced Study and Investigation Rela- 
ting to their Distribution, Identification, aud Methods 
of Eradication, and Prevention of Dissemination. Mr. 
Hume. 

111. The Selection of Seeds; Methods of Determining 
Quality. Mr. Hume. 

112. Plant Breeding, Including a Detailed Study of 
Experiments at this Station, and of Methods and Results 
Reported From Other States and From Foreign Coun- 
tries. Mr. Smith. 

113. Machine Designing; Advanced Study of Farm Im- 
plements with Special Reference to Possible Improve- 
ments. Mr. Crane. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 
Work is constantly in progress in the various branches 
of animal husbandry at the Experiment Station, and ample 
opportunities are offered graduate students desiring to 
take part in these investigations. The department has 
well chosen representations of all the most prominent breeds 
of livestock, has special facility for investigations pertain- 



72 

mg to food stuffs and nutrition, and for the study of results 
in the production of meats. Opportunities are offered for 
advanced studies in various problems of breeds and breed- 
ing for which the department is supplied with the requisite 
literature and illustrative material. At least two years of 
undergraduate study in the general subject is required for 
major graduate work. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

7. Principles of Stock Feeding.— The functional activities 
of the animal body and the end products of their metabolism. 
Foods are considered first chemically, as affording materials for 
the construction of the body tissues or of animal products, as meat, 
milk, wool, etc.; second, dynamically, as supplying the potential 
energy for the body processes and for external labor; third, as to 
the fertilizing value of their residues. I,; first half; daily; 3; (2£). 
Professor Mumford. 

Bequired: Chemistry 1, 3b, 4, 13; entrance physics or its equiv- 
alent and one year of botany or zoology. 

12. Breeds of Beef Cattle. — The history, development, 
and characteristics of the breeds suitable for beef production. 
Tracing pedigrees and a critical study of the same. (This course 
is intended for students expecting to own or manage pure bred 
herds.) Lectures, assigned readings, and exhaustive practice in 
judging. I.; first half; Lectures, M., W., F., 6; Laboratory or prac- 
tical exercises in judging, Tu., Th.; 6, 7; (2i). Professor Mumford. 

Bequired: Animal Husbandry 10, 11. 

14. Management of Pure-Bred Herds of Beef Cattle. 
Like animal husbandry 3, this course is intended for students 
anticipating the management or ownership of registered herds, 
The breeding herd, and its housing, feed and management. 
The selection and fitting of animals for sale and for the show 
ring. Disposal of surplus stock. Lectures and assigned readings. 
I.; second half; daily; 6; (21). Professor Mumford. 

Bequired: Animal Husbandry 10, 11, 12, and 13. 

17. The Education and Driving of the Horse.— A crit- 
ical study of the mental qualities, peculiarities, and limitations 
of the horse, together with the most successful methods of edu- 
cating and training him for skillful work at labor or on the road. 
The rules and practices of correct driving; the responsibilities of 



73 



he driver and the courtesies of the public highway. Lectures, 
eadings, and practice. II. ; second half; daily; 6, 7; (3). 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

101. Development of Type in Domestic Animals.— A 
tudy of the various factors and conditions involved in the devel- 
opment of type and characteristics in the breeds and strains of 
sattle, horses, sheep and swine, and the bearing of these factors 
md conditions upon future improvement. Professor Mumford. 

102. Animal Nutrition, — Advanced work in the principles 
)f nutrition as bearing upon the feeding of animals. Special in- 
stigations at the Experiment Station, also special study of 
ecords of investigations and feeding experiments of the depart- 
nent with reference to problems of nutrition. Professor 
Mumford. 

103. Live Stock Experimentation. — Objects, methods, 
Lnd sources of error in experimental work dealing with the feed- 
ng, breeding and management of farm animals. Detailed study 
>f live stock experiments in progress at this station, and a survey 
>f past and present work in this line by the various experiment 
tations of the world. Professor Mumford. 

HORTICULTURE 

Exceptional facilities for the prosecution of graduate 
vork are offered in the Department of Horticulture. A 
arge collection of wax models of fruits and a rapidly 
growing herbarium of economic and ornamental plants 
^presenting horticultural varieties as well as all the more 
mportant native and imported species furnish material 
:or systematic work in pomology and landscape horticul- 
ture. This work is further facilitated by the large collec- 
ion of apples, flowers and ornamental plants growing 
ipon the University grounds. Opportunity is afforded 
for exhaustive studies in problems concerning the pack- 
ng, storage and marketing of apples. Ample provision 
s made for research work in spraying. The greenhouses 
ifford facilities for the study of problems in plant propaga- 
tion and commercial floriculture. 

At least two years of collegiate work in horticulture and 



74 



allied subjects and the requisite preparation for the chosen 
subjects are required for entrance upon major work in this 
department. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

6. Nursery Methods.— A study of some details of nursery 
management and their relation to horticulture in general. Lec- 
tures and reference readings. II,; first half; daily; 8, (2£) Assis- 
tant Professor Cr and all. 

Required: Horticulture 1, 5; entomology 4. 

7. Spraying.— The theory and practice of spraying plants, 
embracing a study of materials and methods employed in the 
combating of insects and fungous diseases. Kecitations, refer- 
ence readings, and laboratory work. II. , second half; Recitations, 
Tu., Th.; 6; Laboratory, M. W., F.; 6, 7; (2*). Mr. Lloyd. 

Required: Horticulture 1, entomology 4; chemistry 1. 

8. Orchading.— A comprehensive study of pomaceous fruits: 
apple, pear, quince; drupaceous or stone fruits: plum, cherry, 
peach, nectarine, apricot. Lectures, text-books, and laboratory 
work. II. ; Recitations, M. W., F.; 6.; Laboratory, Tu., Th.. 6, 7; 
(5). Professor Blair. 

Required: Horticulture 1; botany 1 or 11. 

10. Landscape Gardening.— Ornamental and landscape gar- 
dening, with special reference to the beautifying of home sur- 
roundings. Lectures illustrated by means of lantern slides and 
charts, recitations, reference readings, and practical exercises. 
II. ; M. W., F.; 4; (3). Professor Blair. 

Required: Two years of University work, or special prepara- 
tion. 

12. Evolution of Cultivated Plants.— Comprising a study 
of organic evolution and the modification of plants by domesti- 
cation. I. ; second half; daily, 3; (2-J). Assistant Professor Cran- 

DALL. 

Required: Regular admission; two years of University work, 
including thremmatology. 

15. Commercial Floriculture.— A study of the growing of 
cut flowers and decorative plants. Recitations and practical 
exercises in the greenhouse. II.; daily; 3. (5). Mr. Beal. 

Required: Horticulture 4, 5; botany 2. 

18. Experimental Horticulture.— A course for those in- 
tending to engage in professional horticulture or experiment 



75 

station work. For advanced students. L; daily; 1; (5). Profes- 
sor Blair, Mr. Crandall, Mr. Lloyd. 

Bequired: Regular admission: twenty hours' work in horti- 
culture. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

101. Pomology.— Studies of special problems regarding the 
relationships, adaptations, improvement, propagation, cultiva- 
tion, pruning, protection, preservation or marketing of orchard 
fruits. Arrange time. Professor Blair and Assistant Professor 
Crandall. 

102. Pomology. — Studies of special problems regarding 
the adaptations, propagation, cultivation or pruning of small 
fruits. Arrange time. Assistant Professor Crandall. 

103. Olericulture.— Studies of special problems regarding 
the structure, cultural requirements, seed selection and im- 
provement of vegetables. Arrange time. Assistant Professor 
Lloyd. 

104. Floriculture. — Studies of the horticultural status of 
various flowering plants, or of special problems in the culture 
of greenhouse plants. Arranqe time. Mr. Beal. 

105. Landscape Horticulture.— Exhaustive studies of orna- 
mental plants, and methods of grouping the same for the effec- 
tive planting of public and private grounds. Arrange time. Pro- 
fessor Blair. 

106. Forestry.— Problems in general forestry and investiga- 
dions of forest growths. Arrange time. Professor Burrill. 

THREMMATOLOGY 
This work offered is primarily for graduate students, but 
it may be taken by undergraduates who have credit for 
thremmatology 1, or who have prosecuted extended studies 
in the problems of evolution. 

COURSE FOR GRADUATES 

101. Opportunity will be given for special studies in funda- 
mental questions relating to the improvement of domesticated 
animals and plants. For this purpose there is available a liberal 
amount of current and standard literature, together with pedi- 
gree and other live stock records and the breeding experiments 
in progress in the Experiment Station. Professor Davenport. 



76 



SUBJECTS OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

ARCHITECTURE AND ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEER- 
ING 

Professor Bicker, Professor White, Professor Wells, Assist- 
ant Professor McLane, Assistant Professor Temple 

A carefully chosen library of the most useful architec- 
tural works arranged in a room near the drawing rooms. 
The more important architectural periodicals in English, 
French and German. A very large and classified collec- 
tion of photographs and plates from architectural journals 
for reference in designing. Card indexes to several 
American professional journals. Opportunities for exper- 
imental research in steel and concrete construction, heating 
and ventilation, refrigeration, etc. , in the various labora- 
tories of this College. Registration for graduate work 
requires a full undergraduate course in Architecture or 
Architectural Engineering. 

courses for graduates 

101. Construction of Large Wooden Buildings.— Foun- 
dations, floors and ceilings, walls, roofs, economic spacing- of 
columns, girders, beams. 

102. New Uses of Stone, Brick, and Terra Cotta.— 
Stone columns, beams, lintels, walls, floors and ceiling; brick piers 
walls, vaulted ceilings, terra cotta columns, architraves, ceilings, 
roofs, and internal finish. 

103. Steel Frame Buildings. — Foundations; cantilever 
girders; columns and their connections; girders, spandrels, and 
beams; roof frames; wind-bracing; economical spacing of col- 
umns and beams; economical planning. 

104. Fire Proofing. — Systems of construction; their campar-' 
ison; results of tests and of fires; defects to be remedied inordin- 
ary fire-proofing; advantages of fire-proof structures as invest- 
ments. 

105. Sanitation of Public Buildings. — Plumbing and 



77 

fixtures; water supply and sewerage of city and country build- 
ings; examinations, criticisms, and reports on examples: designs 
for particular cases. 

106. Evolution of Architectural Styles.— Tracing the 
development of the column, pier, entablature, door and window, 
ceiling and roof; of designs and purposes of chief buildings; 
changes in decoration; influences of materials and climate. 

107. Advanced Graphic Statics.— The kern and its uses; 
central ellipse or circle of inertia; uses of shear, moment, and 
deflection diagrams for all beams; statics of the arch, vault, 
dome, and of the Gothic buttress system. 

108. Heating and Ventilating Systems.— Application to 
large groups of buildings; designs for large plants; examinations 
and tests of plants with reports; economics of the subject. 

109. Advanced Architectural Designs.— Designing large 
buildings for public or private use, including construction, heat- 
ing and ventilating, sanitation, lighting, with all conveniences 
to save time. 

110. Applied Esthetics.— Theories of proportion and their 
application; study of average proportions in leading architec- 
tural styles; experiments in deviations. 

111. Translation of a French or German Architec- 
tural Work.— Extraction of essentials; condensed translation; 
complete translation submitted for criticism and correction. 

112. Indexing and Classification.— Indexing periodicals 
by Dewey decimal system; collection and arrangement of data 
for professional use; systems of arranging and filing papers and 
drawings. 

113. Stereotomy. — Applications to arches, vaults, domes, 
and stairways, of stone, brick, terra cotta, or steel-concrete; 
working drawings and templates. 

114. Slow-Burning Construction.— The factory mill-floor 
system; European systems; applications; results of tests of fires; 
economics of the systems. 

115. Photography for Architects.— Practice in making 
views of exteriors, interiors, details, and of drawings; lantern 



78 



slides; printing by different processes; mounting and arrange- 
ment. 

116. Copying Specifications and Drawings.— Practice in 
use of different methods; their advantages and defects; improve- 
ments; drawing and tracing for reproduction. 

117. Advanced Perspective.— Study and application of 
higher French methods; lights and shadows; oblique views; re- 
flections; abbreviated methods. 

118. Specifications and Estimates for Large Buildings. 
Study of examples; making outlines; collection and arrangement 
of data; preparation of complete sets. 

119. Industrial Design.— Internal wood-work of buildings; 
floors of parquetry, tiles of mosaics; marble-work; mantels; mov- 
able furniture. 

120. Advanced Water Color Painting.— Practice in out- 
door sketching; rendering elevations and perspectives in ink, 
sepia, color, etc. 

121. Office Arrangements and Methods.— Plans of arch- 
itects' offices; storage and drawings of completed work, filing 
contracts, specifications, tracings and prints of work in progress; 
forms of official papers; bookkeeping for buildings; collection of 
data for reference. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 
Professor Baker. 

The Cement Laboratory is well supplied with equipment 
for the study of problems relating to the structural value 
of cement and lime, and a Road Laboratory is in process 
of installation which will afford facilities for testing the 
road-building qualities of broken stone and gravel. Stud- 
ents in the Civil Engineering Department have opportuni- 
ties for working in the Materials Testing and Hydraulic 
Laboratories, as well as in other laboratories of the Uni- 
versity. For entrance to graduate work a full undergrad- 
uate course in Civil Engineering is required. 



79 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

101. Location and Construction.— Advanced work in the 
economic theory of railway location with relation to the effects 
of distance, grade, and curve upon operation and maintenance. 
Estimates, specifications and contracts, and the improvement of 
existing lines of railway. 

102. Railway Track and Structures, and Their Main- 
tenance.— The design of track standards and of minor rail- 
road structures, trestles, culverts, turn-tables, water-tanks, en- 
gine houses, etc., with special reference to economic principles of 
construction and maintenance. 

103. Yards and Terminals.— The arrangement of tracks, 
buildings, etc., at division and terminal points with reference to 
economy and facility in handling traffic. Personal inspection 
and report on actual cases. 

104. Motive Power and Rolling Stock.— Locomotive con- 
struction and performance, and car building and repairs. 

105. Signal Engineering.— A study of the various systems 
of railway signaling. Personal inspections and comparisons of 
different plants in actual operation. 

106. Railway Operation and Management.— The organi- 
zation and administration of the several branches of service in 
railway operation. 

107. Bridge Design. — A comparative study of the details of 
standard designs, with personal inspection of the process of 
manufacture and erection. 

108. Cantilever and Swing Bridges.— The computation 
of stresses, design of parts, method of erection, etc. 

109. Metallic Arches.— Computation of stresses and de- 
sign of metallic arches. 

110. Metallic Building Construction.— The computation 
and drawings of a design for a metal skeleton building, with a 
consideration of standard connections. 

111. Roof Construction.— Computations of stresses and de- 
signs of steel roof stresses. 

112. Stereotomy. 

113. Theory of the Elastic Arch. 

114. Water Power Development. 

115. Re-enforced Concrete Construction. 



80 



116. Geodesy.— A study of the methods employed in triangu- 
lation, with practice in reading angles: base-line measurements, 
method of least squares and adjustments of triangulation sys- 
tems; map projection; trigonometrical leveling. 

117. Critical Description of Engineering Construc- 
tion.— Details of methods and costs from personal inspection 
during progress of construction. 

ELECTEICAL ENGINEERING 
Professor Brooks, Assistant Professor Williams. 

The Department of Electrical Engineering has a well- 
equipped laboratory containing a large variety of dyna- 
mos, motors, transformers, etc., furnishing facilities for 
tests upon the transmision and distribution of power. 
It has a particularly large and well selected cabinet of 
standard measuring and testing instruments. There are 
two photometers, and an assortment of the commercial 
varieties of electric lamps of all types. There is a stor- 
age battery of 60 cells, heating and welding apparatus, 
and an artificial transmission line for making reliable long 
distance transmission tests. The facilities for experi- 
mental engineering, both commercial and theoretical are 
excellent, and will be materially increased. 

A full undergraduate course in Electrical Engineering 
is required for registration in graduate work. 
courses for graduates 

101. Advanced Theory of Alternating Currents. — 
Discussion of the limitations of theory. Effect of minor errors 
of observation. 

102. Dynamo Electric Machinery.— Standardization of 
armature windings, of design formulas, and of test methods. 
Study of leakage flux. 

103. Alternating Current Machinery.— Transformers 
and their connections for single and polyphase working. Meth- 
ods of compensation. The series and repulsion motor; operating 
efficiencies. 

104. Transmission of Power.— Limiting conditions as re- 



81 



gards voltage, distance, charging current, and frequency. Types 
of machines. Experiments with artificial line. 

105. Electric Light and Power Plants.— Economic lim- 
itations. Comparison of different designs. Determination of 
highest efficiency. 

106. Electro-Metallurgy.— Experiments with the electric 
furnace. Refining of metals; recent storage batteries, and their 
possible improvement. 

107. Electric Lighting. — Study of artistic illumination. 
Limitation of frequency for various types of lamps. Increased 
safety of wiring. 

108. Electrical Engineering Research. — Problems to be 
assigned on consultation. 

109. Electrical Design.— Standard practice. Discussion 
of improvements. 

110. Telephone Engineering.— Standardization of appa- 
ratus. Switchboard design. Line testing. Methods for increas- 
ing efficiency and possible distance. Cables. 

111. Telegraph Engineering. — Study of commercial con- 
ditions. Determination of best method or rapid machine-trans- 
mission. Simultaneous telegraphy and telephony. Wireless 
telegraphy in relation to ordinary telegraphy, and in regard to 
improvements. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Breckenridge, Assistant Professor Goodenotjgh, 

Assistant Professor Leutwiler, Assistant Professor 

Randall. 

The equipment available for experimental investigation 
in the Department of Mechanical Engineering is most 
complete along the following lines: 

1. Boiler tests with various types of furnace and stokers. 

2. The generation of power with engines of different types 
and at various steam pressures up to 275 lb. 

3. The use of steam for heating from a central station, loss 
of pressure, and heat by transmission through long mains. 



82 



4. The generation, transmission and use of compressed air. 

5. The generation of power by small gas or gasoline motors, 
including the testing of automobile vehicles. 

6. Mechanical refrigeration. — There are three plants availa- 
ble for testing and examinination. 

7. Locomotive road testing and train resistance tests.— For 
this work the department owns with the Illinois Central Kail- 
road a fully equipped railway test car. 

8. The measurement of power required to operate machine 
tools and woodworking machinery.— This includes tests relating 
to the performance of various tools and the comparison of differ- 
ent kinds of tool steel. 

The construction of a new Steam Engineering Labora- 
tory, for the equipment of which a generous appropriation 
has been made, will greatly increase the space and facilities 
of the department for experimentation. 

A complete equipment will be added for experiments in 
the subject of heating and ventilation, as well as for the 
production of superheated steam. 

Arrangements have been made with the management of 
the Peoria & Eastern Railway shops at Urbana for carry- 
ing on many tests and investigations on a commercial 
scale, not usually possible in a school laboratory, and 
much valuable aid is assured the department by the officers 
of this company. These shops are new, extensive and 
modern in all respects. There is required a full under- 
graduate course in Mechanical Engineering for entrance 
upon graduate work. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

101. Advanced Machine Design.— The work offered in ma- 
chine design will be arranged to suit individual students. It 
covers a wide field and may include all forms of motors as well 
as usual and special machinery. 



83 



102. Graphics aistd Kinematics.— The application of graphi- 
cal dynamics, especially to governors. A study of acceleration 
in mechanisms, using Coriolis' law as a basis. 

103. Mill Engineering. — Transmission of power; design 
and installation of power plants. 

104. Steam Engineering.— Critical study of superheating, 
jacketing, compounding; steam turbines: the generation of steam. 

105. Experimental Engineering. — Tests of engines, boil- 
ers, air compressors, power plants, pumping plants, etc. 

106. Thermodynamics.— Reading of advanced texts, as Park- 
er's or Buckingham's. Critical study of cycles, both direct and 
reversed. Solution of numerous problems. 

107. Pneumatics. — Air compression; transmission of air 
through pipes: theory and design of centrifugal fans and blow- 
ers; blowing engines. 

108. Hydraulic Machinery. — Pumps and pumping engines; 
centrifugal and rotary pumps; hydraulic presses, punches, cranes, 
etc.; hydraulic elevators; hydraulic transmission. 

109. Machinery and Manufacturing.— Shop construction 
and methods; cost-keeping systems; automatic machinery and 
interchangeable parts; adaptation of special machinery to the 
various industries. 

110. Translation of Technical Engineering Litera- 
ture. — Under this head is included the translation of engineer- 
ing books and also of important articles appearing in Zeitschrif t 
des Vereines Deutscher Ingeneur, Kevue de Mecanique, etc. 

111. Heat Engines and Gas Engineering.— The various 
heat engine cycles; temperature-entropy analysis applied to heat 
engines; engines with two or more fluids; general theory of the 
gas engine; gas producers; gaseous fuels. 

112. Locomotive Engineering.— Study of the design and 
constructing of locomotives; counterbalancing; road tests of loco- 
motives. 

113. Mechanical Eefrigeration.— Thermodynamic the- 
ory of refrigeration; properties of refrigerating fluids. Study of 
ice and refrigeration plants. 

114. Motor Vehicles.— The various types of automobiles. 

115. Indexing and Classification of Engineering Lit- 
erature. 



84 

MECHANICS, THEORETICAL AND APPLIED 
Professor Talbot. 
The Laboratory of Applied Mechanics with its well- 
arranged building, numerous testing machines of various 
types for making tension, compression, cross-bending, 
and torsion tests of structural materials, the special facil- 
ities for testing paving brick, and its commodious hy- 
draulic laboratory well fitted with tanks, piping, channels, 
pumps, motors and measuring devices, offers exceptional 
facilities for investigational work. New equipment is to 
be added, including a 500,000 lb. testing machine. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

101. Analytical Mechanics.— Studies of advanced texts; 
comparisons of texts and methods and presentation for an ele- 
mentary course. 

102. Resistance of Materials.— Study of the properties of 
structural materials, of the methods of testing for these proper- 
ties, and of the determination of internal stresses. 

103. Hydraulics and Hydraulic Engineering. — Ad- 
vanced work in hydraulics. 

104. Laboratory of Applied Mechanics.— Investigational 
work either in the materials testing laboratory or in the hy- 
draulic laboratory. 

MUNICIPAL AND SANITARY ENGINEERING 

Professor Talbot, Mr. Slocum 
The University water works and the hydraulic labora- 
tory, as well as the bacteriological and chemical labora- 
tories, offer advantages to the student in water supply 
engineering and sewerage, and near-by cities give oppor- 
tunities for a study of water filtration and sewage disposal 

plants. 

courses for graduates 
101. Tanks, Standpipes and Reservoirs.— Design and 
methods of construction of these structures. Especial attention 
to the cause of failure of standpipes and to requirements for safe 
construction. Study of plans of existing structures and of meth- 
ods of construction employed. 



85 



102. Sources and Requirements of Water Supply for 
a City and Removal of Impurities.— A study of the various 
sources of supply and of their development, of methods of filtra- 
tion, and of the design and operation of filtered plants. 

103. Water Works Management and Economics. — Water 
works records; revenue, operation, management, franchises and 

their relation to the public, with a study of existing plants. 

104. Pumps and Pumping.— Types of pump; design, con- 
struction, operation, duty and efficiency; applicability of differ- 
ent types; duty trials and tests. 

105. General Water Works Construction.— When prac- 
ticable a discussion will be made of plans, methods, and construc- 
tion of work with which the student has been connected. 

106. Biological and Chemical Examination of Potable 
Water. — This will be given in connection with the departments 
of botany and chemistry. 

107. Description of Water Supply Systems. — Critical dis- 
cussion of water-works systems from personal observation made 
daring construction and upon the operation of similar plants. 

111. Sewage Purification.— A study of the processes and 
methods in use, of the results obtained, and of the requirements 
and needs of sewage disposal. 

112. Sewage Disposal Works.— The design and methods of 
construction of various forms of purification plants and of their 
applicability and efficiency. 

113. General Sewerage Design and Construction. — 
This usually involves the actual work of designing and partici- 
pating in the work of construction of systems of sewers. 

114. City Sanitation. — Methods and processes of garbage 
collection, reduction and disposal; sanitary restrictions and 
health measures. 

115. Description of Sewerage Systems.— Critical exami- 
nation and description from personal observations made during 
construction and upon the operation of sewerage systems. 

118. Economic Aspect of Good Roads and Pavements.— 
An investigation of the value of road improvements. 

119. Construction of Roads and Pavements. — Tests and 
requirements of meterials. Specifications. Comparison of cost, 
desirability and durability. Grades and location. 



86 



SOCIETIES AND CLUBS 

CLUBS AUXILIAEY TO COUESES OF STUDY 
Agricultural Club 

This club meets weekly. It is devoted to the discussion 
of topics of theoretical and practical interest to students 
of agriculture. All students connected with the Univer- 
sity are eligible to membership. 

Architects' Club 
This club meets once in two weeks for the consideration 
of current topics of architectural interest and subjects con- 
nected with the study of architectural history . All students 
pursuing architectural studies are eligible to membership. 
This club is a member of the Architectural League of 
America, and contributes to its annual exhibition in the 
principal cities of the United States. 

Biological Theory Club 
This club meets on alternate Monday evenings through- 
out the college year for papers, addresses, and discussions 
on subjects in theoretical biology. Its membership is com- 
posed of instructors in biological subjects in the Colleges 
of Science and Agriculture. 

Civil Engineering Club 
This club meets the second and fourth Saturday even- 
ings of each month for the reading and discussion of papers 
relating to civil engineering. All students pursuing the 
civil engineering course may become members. 

The English Club 
The English Club is composed of members of the Fac- 
ulty, and of students who have done especially good work 
in English. The work of the club is confined to the study 



87 

of recent writers of fiction and of poetry. The member- 
ship is limited to thirty. Meetings are held on the second 
Monday of each month. 

French Club 
Le Cercle Francais includes students who have had at 
least one year's work in French. The club meets twice a 
month throughout the year. Its proceedings are conducted 
in French, the object being to supplement the work of the 
class room by the practical handling and understanding of 
the language. 

Library Club 

The instructors and students of the Library School have 
organized a Library Club. Any member of the staff of 
the University library, of the Champaign public library, 
or of the Urbana public library, or any student who is 
registered for the Library School may become an active 
member. Trustees of the three libraries before mentioned 
are considered honorary members. Any others interested 
in library progress may become associate members. 

Meetings are held once in three weeks during the college 
year. The first and last meetings of the year are of a social 
nature. The intervening meetings are devoted to topics 
of literary or technical library interest. 

Mathematical Club 
The Mathematical Club is open for membership to the 
instructors and students of mathematics at the University. 
It meets once in two weeks to discuss questions of interest 
in pure and applied mathematics. 

Mechanical and Electrical Engineering Society. 
This club meets on the second and fourth Friday even- 
ings of each month. All students pursuing mechanical 
and electrical engineering studies are eligible to member- 
ship. Papers relating to subjects of interest to members 
are presented and discussed at each meeting. 



Musical Clubs 
These include the Choral Society, Orchestra, Band, and 
Mandolin and Guitar, and two Glee Clubs. 

The Natural History Society 

This society is composed of instructors and students in- 
terested in the natural sciences. It conducts field excursions 
and exhibitions of objects of natural history, and provides 
occasional lectures on science subjects of general interest. 
Political Science Club 

This club is composed of the members of the corps of 
instruction in history, economics and law, and of such 
students of at least junior and senior standing as make 
a record for marked excellence in work in these depart- 
ments. It meets once a month. 

Zoological Club 

The University Zoological Club is composed of ad- 
vanced students and instructors in the zoological and 
physiological departments, together with such other bio- 
logical instructors and advanced students as are interested 
in its subjects. Its sessions are devoted to the presenta- 
tion and discussion of abstracts of recent biological litera- 
ture and of the results of investigation by the members of 
the club. It meets weekly in Natural History Hall. 

Literary Societies 

The Adelphic and Philomathean societies for men, and 

the Alethenai for women, occupy large halls, which the 

members have appropriately furnished and decorated. 

Meetings are held Friday evenings throughout term time. 

THE CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 
Young Men's and Young Women's Christian Associations 

The Young Men's and Young Women's Christian Asso- 
ciations have come to occupy a prominent place in the 
University life. Both are affiliated with the World's Stu- 



89 

dent Christian Federation, which is the largest student 
organization in existence. 

Five hundred and fifteen men now belong to the Young 
Men's, and three hundred women to the Young Women's, 
Association. Each association employs for full time a 
general secretary. 

The Association House furnishes free to all students, 
reading room, game room, library, parlors, piano, maga- 
zines and papers, correspondence tables and telephone — a 
college home. 

Religious meetings for men are held on Sunday morn- 
ings; for women on Thursday afternoons; and for both 
men and women on Monday evenings. There are fre- 
quent meetings for the promotion of social intercourse 
and good fellowship. 

Courses in systematic Bible study and in modern mis- 
sions are offered. During the year four hundred and 
twenty-nine men and two hundred women have enrolled 
in these courses. A most helpful feature of the work is 
that in the interest of new students at the opening of 
the school year. Desirable rooms and boarding places 
are found and posted for reference as the Association 
House. Representatives of the Associations meet the 
trains, assist students in finding satisfactory locations, and 
endeavor in every way to make them feel at home. The 
employment bureau helps to find work. 

A copy of the Students' Hand-Book, containing a map 
of the cities, and giving information about Champaign 
and Urbana, the University, and the various college or- 
ganizations and activities, will be sent free to prospective 
students. 

For further information address the General Secretary 
of either Association, Champaign. 



90 



EXPENSES 

BOARD 

The University does not furnish board, but there are 
a large number of suitable places within easy walking 
distance of the University or readily accessible by elec- 
tric railway where students can find table board at from 
$3.00 to $3.50 per week each, and rooms (suitable for 
two) at about $36.00 to $54.00 for a semester of 18 weeks. 

The Young Men's and Young Woman's Christian Asso- 
ciations aid new students in procuring rooms and board- 
ing places. 

FEES 

The fees for members of the Graduate School are the 
same as for undergraduate students of the Colleges of Lit- 
erature and Arts, Agriculture, and Engineering as follows: 

Matriculation, payable upon entrance $10.00 

Diploma, payable before degree is awarded 5.00 

Incidental, each semester 12.00 

Laboratory, actual expenses, deposits 50c to 10.00 



91 



LIST OF STUDENTS 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 

CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

*Crocker, William, A. M., 1903, DeKalb, Botany. 

Day, Edna Daisy, M. S., (Univ. of Mich.), 1897, Urbana, Botany. 

Dewey, James Ansel, M. S., 1898, Urbana, Bacteriology. 

Gleason, Henry Allen, B. S., 1901, Champaign, Botany. 

Heuse, Edward Otto, B. S. [Hanover, Coll.), 1900, Madison, Ind., 
Chemistry. 

Latzer, Jennie Mary, M. S., 1900, Highland, Botany. 

Matson, George Charleton, A. M., .{Cornell Univ.), 1903, Cham- 
paign, Geology. 

Miller, John Ezra, A. M., 1902, Urbana, Latin. 

Pillsbury, Bertha Marion, A. M.. (Eadcliffe College), 1899, English. 

Ponzer, Ernest William, M. $., 1903, Champaign, Mathematics. 

Reeves, George I., A. B., 1902, Wauponsee, Zoology. 

*Ross, Luther Sherman, M. S., 1900, Des Moines, la., Zoology. 

Sakagami, Yasuzo, M. L., (Univ. of Minn.), 1899, Wdkagamaken, 
Japan, Political Science. 

Sammis, John Langley, M. S. 1899, Champaign, Chemistry. 

Schulz, William Frederick, E. E., 1900, Urbana, Physics. 

Zartman, Lester William, A. B., 1903, Grant Park, Economics. 

CANDIDATES FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE 

Anderson, Mary, A. B., 1903, Macon, Mathematics. 
Barrett, James Theophilus, A B., 1903, Urbana. Botany. 
Black, Alice Mary, A. B., 1900, Champaign, Latin. 
*Bond, Anna Louise, A. B., 1903, Mt. Vernon, English. 
*Booker, Lucile Alice, A. B., 1899, Stillwater, Minn., English. 
Briscoe, Charley Francis, A. B., (Indiana State Univ.), 1899, Ur- 
bana, Botany. 

*Bullock, Jessie Jane, A. B., 1900, Champaign, Mathematics. 
Church, Walter Samuel, B. S. s 1900, Chicago, Architecture. 
*Clark, Mary Edith, A. B., 1899, Sheldon, Philosophy. 



*In absentia. See page 29. 



92 



Clarke, Samuel C, B. S., (Univ. of Chicago), 1900, Urbana, Chem- 
istry. 

*Clarke, Edwin Besancon, B. S., 1891, Chicago, Architecture. 

JCollis, Frank Bernard, B. S., 1902, Norwich, Conn., Mechanical 
Engineering. 

Crosthwait, George Ashley, B. S., 1903, Moscow, Idaho, Agronomy. 

Crane, Fred Randall, B. S., (Mich, Agr'l Coll.), 1899, Urbana, Agro- 
nomy. 

Dickerson, Oliver Morton, A. B. 1903, West Liberty, History. 

Dillon, Gertrude Sempill, A. B. 1901, Sheldon, German. 

East, Edward Murray, B. S., 1901, Champaign, Agronomy. 

Emmett, Arthur Donaldson, B. S., 1901, Urbana, Chemistry. 

Falkenberg, Fred Peter, A. B., 1902, Chicago, English. 

Fox, Harry Bert, B. S., 1900, Urbana, Geology. 

Franklin, Lois Gertrude, A. B., 1903, Dwight, History. 

Fritter, Enoch Abraham, A. M., (Findlay Coll) 1898, Normal, 
English. 

*Fucik, Edward James, B. S., 1901, Chicago, Civil Engineering. 

*Gallaher, Thomas Theron, A. B., 1902, Byron, Philosophy. 

Garlough, Carl D, A. M., (Hillsdale, Coll), 1900, Stanford, Mathe- 
matics. 

Gilkerson, Frances Emeline, A. B., 1903, Urbana, German. 

*Greenman. Edwin Gardner, Jr., B. S.,1902, Champaign, Mechan- 
ical Engineering. 

*Grimes, George Lyman, B. S., 1897, Kewanee, Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

Harris, Thomas Luther, A. B., 1902, Modesto, Economics. 

Hayhurst, Emery Roe, A. B., 1903, Maywood, Physiology. 

*Heath, Lawrence Seymour, A. B. 1901, Edinburg, Latin. 

*Hicks, Byron Wallace, B. 8., 1901, Warren, Civil Engineering. 

*Higgins, Francis Whitson, B. S., 1902, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 
Chemistry. 

Hon*, Edna DuBois, A. B., 1903, Chicago Heights, Chemistry. 

*Hoppin, Charles Albert, B. S., 1901, Milwaukee, Wis., Mechanical 
Engineering. 

Horner, Harlan Hoyt, A. B., 1901, Urbana, English. 

Hughes, Clarence Wilbert, A. B., 1900, Urbana, History. 



*Died, November 5, 1903. 



93 



Ingels, Bert Dee, B. S., (DePauw Univ.), 1903, Greencastle^Ind., 
Chemistry. 

*Ireland, Washington Parker, B. S., 1903, Chicago, Civil Engi- 
neering. 

*Johnson, Frederick Dawson, B. S., 1903, Alton, Mechanical En- 
gineering. 

*Johnson, Fred Yollentine, B. S. 1902, Harvey, Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

Jones, Warren, A. B., 1902, Aurora, Eduation. 

Kelley, Frances Emily, A. B., 1901, St. David, German. 

*Kofoid, Beuben Nelson, A. B., 1902, Buffalo, N. Y., Chemistry. 

Lafferty, Guy Clifford, A. B., {Monmouth, Coll), 1903, Alexis, 
Economics. 

Larson, Lawrence Fred, A. B. 1903, Galva, Economics. 

*Layton, Katherine Alberta, A. B., 1901, Canton, German. 

Lytle, Ernest Barnes, B. S., 1901, Urbani, Mathematics. 

*McConnell, Ernest, B. S., 1894, Denver, Colo., Architecture. 

*McLane, John Wallace, B. S., 1901, Washington, D. C.,% Agron- 
omy. 

Malcolm, Charles Wesley, B. S., 1902, Roseville, Civil Engineering. 

*Martin, Albert Carey, B. S., 1902, LaSalle, Architecture. 

Matthews, Kobert Clayton, B. S., 1902, Champaign, Mechanical 
Engineering. 

*Mayall, Edwin Lyman, B. S., 1900, Peoria, Mechanical Engineer- 
ing. 

Miller, Harry Crawford, A. B. (Austin, Coll.), 1893, Nokomis, Edu- 
cation. 

Moor, Rev. George Caleb, Ph. D.,(Ewing, Coll.), 1899, Champaign, 
English. 

*0'Hair, Elizabeth Edna, A. B., 1901, Laurel, Ind,, Latin. 

Parker, Lawrence Gilbert, B. S., 1902, Toluca, Civil Engineering. 

*Parr, Robert William, A. B., 1903, Pontiac, Economics. 

Ponzer, Ernest William, B. S., 1900, Champaign, Mathematics. 

*Radcliffe, William Hickman, B. S., 1901, Chicago, Civil Engineer- 
ing. 

Randall, Dwight T. B. S., 1897, Urbana, Mechanical Engineer- 
ing. 



94 



*Richard, Frederick William, B. S., 1891, Carterville, Mechanical 
Engineering. 

Rolfe, Martha Deette, B. S., 1900. Champaign, Zoology. 

Rolfe, Mary Annette, A. B., 1902, Champaign, Zoology. 

*Sawyer, Geogre Loyal, B. S., 1903, Chicago, Municipal and San- 
itary Engineering. 

*Scudder, Harry Disbro, B. S., 1902, Chicago, Horticulture. 

*$kinner, Elgie Ray, B. S., 1903, Chicago, Mechanical Engineer- 
ing. 

Slocum, Roy Harley, B. S., 1900, Urbana, Municipal and Sanitary 
Engineering. 

*Smith, Bruce, A. B., 1901, Newman, English. 

*Smith, Florence Mary, A. B., 1899, Urbana, English. 

Smith, Fred John, A. B., (Iowa Wesleyan University), 1899, San 
Jose, German. 

*Smith, George Russell, B. S., 1900, Urbana, Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

*Smith, Percy Almerin, B. S., 1901, Hiroshima, Japan, Mathema- 
tics and Physics. 

*Soverhill, Harvey Allen. B. S., 1900, Beloit, Wis., Mechanical 
Engineering. 

^Sperling, Godfrey, B. S., 1895, Boise, Idaho, Civil Engineering. 

*Stine, John Carl, A. B., 1903, Assumption, Education. 

*Strehlow, Oscar Emil, B. S., 1895, Tuscaloosa, Ala., Civil Engi- 
neering. 

*Sussex, James Wolfe, B. S., 1903, Abingdon, Civil Engineering. 

*Swanberg, Floyd Ludwig, B. S., 1902, Danville, Mechanical En- 
gineering. 

*Sweeney, Don, B. S., 1896, Galesburg, Mechanical Engineering. 

Taylor, Helen Mary, A. B., 1902, Bloomington, English. 

*Terry, Charles Dutton, B. S., 1897, Kewanee, Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

-•Tower, Willis Eugene, B. S. 3 1894, Chicago, Physics. 

*Tull, Effle May, A. B., 1901, Farmer City, Latin. 

Waterbury, Leslie Abram, B. S., 1902, Urbana, Civil Engineering. 

Webber, Roy Irvin, B. S., {Purdue Univ.), 1899, Urbana, Civil En- 
gineering. 

Wells, Miriam Ursula, A B., 1903, Maiden, Zoology. 

Western, Irving Mark, A. B., 1902, Dundee, Rhetoric. 



95 

*Whitetiouse, Edith Ursula, A. B., 1902, Canton, Latin. 
*Whitmeyer, Mark Halbert B. S., 1899, Danville, Architecture. 
Whitsit, Hammond William, B. S., 1903, Urbana, Architecture. 
*Wilcox, Maurice Meacham, B. S., 1899, Kentwood, La., Civil En- 
gineering. 
Williams, Winifred Sue, A. B., 1901, Urbana, German. 
Willis, Clifford, B. S., 1900, Urbana, Agronomy. 
Wilson, Joseph Wade, B. S., 1903, Chicago, Architecture. 
*Wright, Sidney Walter, A. B., 1901, Mechanicsburgh, History. 
*Wood, Harvey Edgerton, A. B., 1900, Joliet, Economics. 
Young, Sadie, B. S., (Univ. of Fla,), 1902, Lake City, Fla., English. 

NOT CANDIDATES FOR A DEGREE 

Calhoun, Henrietta Anne, A.M., 1903, Champaign, Physiology. 

Fox, Fred Gates, A.M., 1903, Urbana, English. 

Lefler, Emma Grace, B. L. S., 1903, Pontiac, English. 

Lloyd, John William, M. S. A., (Cornell Univ.), 1903, Champaign, 

Botany. 
Zangerle, Arthur Norman, B. S., 1903, Chicago, Chemistry. 



96 



SUMMARY OF STUDENTS— 1903-1904 

Men. Women. Total. 

Graduate School 94 26 1 20 

Under Graduate Colleges— 

Seniors 170 104 274 

Juniors 186 72 258 

Sophomores 388 87 375 

Freshmen 439 134 573 

Specials 196 106 302 

I 279 503 I 782 

Specials in Agriculture 133 i 134 

Specials in Household Science . 14 14 

Summer Term 137 92 229 

College of Law— 

Third year 36 36 

Second year 27 27 

First year 52 52 

Specials 27 27 

142 142 

College of Medicine — 

Seniors 227 18 245 

Juniors 178 12 190 

Sophomores 132 11 143 

Freshmen 85 9 94 

Unclassified 19 3 22 

641 53 694 

College of Dentistry — 

Seniors 56 3 59 

Juniors 64 1 65 

Freshmen 39 39 

1 59 4 1 63 

School of Pharmacy— 

Seniors 68 68 

Juniors 116 1 117 

1 84 I 1 85 

Academy 1 89 68 257 

2958 762 3720 

Deduct counted twice 80 44 1 24 

Total in University 2878 718 3596 



)?oV-di 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS BULLETIN 

Vol. 1 JUNE 15, 1904 No. 18 

[Entered at Urbana, Illinois, as second-class matter] 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



OF THE 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 




PUBLISHED FORTNIGHTLY BY THE UNIVERSITY 



1. 


Men's Gymnasium. 


2. 


Armory. 


3. 


Wood Shop. 


4. 


Metal Shops. 


5. 


Electrical and Me- 
chanical Laboratory. 


6. 


Reservoir. 


7. 


Heating Plant. 


8. 


Pumping - Plant. 


9. 


Laboratory of Applied 
Mechanics. 


10. 


Engineering- Hall. 


11. 


Greenhouse. 


12. 


President's House. 


13. 


Library. 


14. 


University Hall. 


15. 


Natural History Hall. 


16. 


College of Law. 


17. 


Chemical Laboratory. 


18. 


Agricultural Build- 
ings. 


19. 


Greenhouse. 


20. 


Veterinary Building. 


21. 


Insectary. 



w- 




UNIVERSITY GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



OF THE 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



1904-1905 




URBANA, ILLINOIS 

PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY 



1 






TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Calendar 4 

Board of Trustees 6 

Officers of Administration 7 

Heads of Departments 9 

Location and History 11 

Organization of the University 12 

Buildings and Grounds 15 

Laboratories and Collections 16 

History of the Graduate School 24 

Admission and Registration 25 

Studies and Examinations 27 

Degrees 29 

Fellowships 31 

Courses of Study 33 

Subjects of the College of Literature and Arts . . 34 

Subjects of the College of Science 50 

Subjects of the College of Agriculture 68 

Subjects of the College of Engineering .... 76 

Societies and Clubs 86 

Expenses 90 



THE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

1904-1905 



1904 
Sept. 7, Wednesday. 
Sept. 12, 13, Monday 

and Tuesday. 
Sept. 14, Wednesday. 
Oct. 31, Monday. 

Nov. 24, Thursday. 
Dec. 21, Wednesday. 

1905. 
Jan. 3, Tuesday. 
Jan. 27, Friday. 



Jan. 30, Monday. 

May 11, 12, Thursday 
and Friday. 

May 12, Friday eve- 
ning. 

May 11, 12, 13, Thurs- 
day to Saturday. 

May 13, Saturday. 

May 22, Monday. 

May 26, Friday. 
June 4, Sunday. 
June 5, Monday. 
June 6, Tuesday. 
June 7, Wednesday. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Entrance Examinations begin. 

Registration Days. 
Instruction begins. 
Latest date for announcing Subjects of 

Theses. 
Thanksgiving Day. 
Holiday Recess begins. 

Instruction resumed. 
First Semester ends. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Instruction begins. 

University High School Conference. 
Interscholastic Oratorical Contest. 

Public School Art Exhibit. 

Interscholastic Athletic Meet. 
j Hazelton Prize Drill. 
( Company Competitive Drill. 

Latest Day for Acceptance of Theses. 

Baccalaureate Address. 

Class Day. 

Alumni Day. 

Thirty-fourth Annual Commencement. 



Sept. 13, Wednesday, 
Sept. 18, 19, Monday 

and Tuesday. 
Sept. 20, Wednesday, 
Nov. 6, Monday. 

Nov. 30, Thursday. 
Dec. 15, Friday. 

1906. 
ran. 2, Tuesday, 
fan. 26, Friday. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Entrance Examinations begin. 

Registration Days. 
Instruction begins. 
Latest date for Announcing Subjects of 

Theses. 
Thanksgiving Day. 
Holiday Recess begins. 

Instruction resumed. 
First Semester Ends. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



The Governor of Illinois Ex Officio 

KICHAED YATES Springfield. 

The President of the State Board of Agriculture, ' * 
JAMES K. DICKIESON Lawrenceville. 

The Superintendent of Public Instruction .... " 
ALFBED BATLISS Springfield 



ALICE ASBUEY ABBOTT Urbana ] 

1108 W. Illinois St. 

FEEDERIC L. HATCH Spring Grove 

AUGUSTUS F. NIGHTINGALE . . Chicago 

159 LaSalle St. 



Term of Office 

expires in 

1905. 



ALEXANDER McLEAN Macomb ] Term of Office 

SAMUEL A. BULLARD Springfield [ expires in 

CARRIE T. ALEXANDER Belleville j 1907. 

WILLIAM B. McKINLEY .... Champaign 1 Term of Office 
LEONIDAS H. KERRICK . . . Bloomington [ expires in 
LAURA B. EYANS Taylorville J 1909. 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

Frederic L. Hatch .... Spring Grove President. 

William L. Pillsbury . . Urbana Secretary. 

Elbridge G. Keith .... Chicago Treasurer. 

First National Bank. 

Professor S. W. Shattuck, Urbana, Business Manager. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Fredric L. Hatch, Chairman; Augustus F. Nightingale, William 

B. McKinley. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

President: ANDREW S. DRAPER, LL.D. Office, Library 
Building. 

Business Manager: SAMUEL W. SHATTUCK, C.E. Office, 
Library Building. Office hours, 3 to 5 p. m. 

Registrar: WILLIAM L. PILLSBURY, A.M. Office, Library 
Building. Office hours, 2 to 5 p. m. 

COUNCIL OF ADMINISTRATION 

ANDREW SLOAN DRAPER, LL.D., President. 

President's House, University Campus, 77.* 

THOMAS JONATHAN BURRILL, Ph.D., LL.D., Vice-Pres- 
ident. Dean of the Graduate School and Professor of 
Botany and Horticulture. 1007 West Green Street, 77. 

NATHAN CLIFFORD RICKER, D.Arch., Dean of the 
College of Engineering and Professor of Architecture. 

612 West Green Street, U. 
STEPHEN ALFRED FORBES, Ph.D., Dean of the College 
of Science and Professor of Zoology. 

1209 West Springfield Avenue, 77. 

DAVID KINLEY, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Litera- 
ture and Arts and Professor of Economics, Secretary. 

1101 West Oregon Street, 77. 

EUGENE DAVENPORT, M.Agr., Dean of the College of 
Agriculture and Professor of Thremmatology. 

Experiment Station Farm, 77. 

WILLIAM EDWARD QUINE, M.D., Dean of the College 
of Medicine and Professor of the Practice of Medicine and 
Clinical Medicine. Columbus Memorial Building, Chicago, 



*U. stands for Urbana, C. for Champaign. 



VIOLET DELILLE JAYNE, Ph.D., Dean of the Woman's 
Department and Associate Professor of the English Lan- 
guage and Literature. 1017 West Oregon Street, 77. 

THOMAS ARKLE CLARK, B.L., Dean of Undergraduates 
and Assistant to the President. Professor of Rhetoric. 

928 West Illinois Street, U 

OLIVER ALBERT HARKER, A.M., Dean of the College 
of Law and Professor of Law. 

Carbondale, Illinois, Hotel Beardsley, 6. 

LIBRARIAN 
KATHARINE LUCINDA SHARP, Ph.M., B.L.S., Librarian. 
Office, Library. 



HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS OFFERING GRAD- 
UATE COURSES. 



THOMAS JONATHAN BURRILL, Ph. D., LL. D., Professor 
of Botany. 1007 West Greeen Streeet, U. 

NATHAN CLIFFORD KICKER, D. Arch., Professor of Archi- 
ture. 612 West Green Street, U. 

SAMUEL WALKER SHATTUCK, C.E., Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 1018 West California Avenue, U. 

IRA OSBORN BAKER, C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

702 West University Avenue, C. 

STEPHEN ALFRED FORBES, Ph. D., Professor of Zoology. 

1209 West Springfield Avenue, U. 

CHARLES WESLEY ROLFE, M.S,, Professor of Geology. 

601 East John Street, C. 

ARTHUR NEWELL TALBOT, C.E., Professor of Municipal 
and Sanitary Engineering. 1011 California Avenue, U. 

SAMUEL WILSON PARR, M.S., Professor of Applied Chem- 
istry. 919 West Green Street, 77. 

HERBERT JEWETT BARTON, A.M., Professor of the Latin 
Language and Literature. 406 West Hill Street, C. 

CHARLES MELVILLE MOSS, Ph.D., Professor of the Greek 
Language and Literature. 806 South Mathews Avenue, U. 

DANIEL KILHAM DODGE, Ph.D., Professor of the English 
Language and Literature. 308 West Hill Street, C. 

LESTER PAIGE BRECKENRIDGE, Ph.B., Professor of Me- 
chanical Engineering. 1005 West Green Street, 77. 

DAVID KINLEY, Ph.D. Professor of Economics. 

1101 West Oregon Street, 77. 



10 



EUGENE DAVENPORT, M. Agr., Professor of Thremmatology. 

Experiment Station Farm, U. 

ALBERT PRUDEN CARMAN, Sc.D., Professor of Physics. 

908 California Avenue, V. 

EYARTS BOUTELL GREENE, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

915 West Illinois Street, U. 

GEORGE THEOPHILUS KEMP, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of 
Physiology. 112 West Hill Street, C. 

ARTHUR HILL DANIELS, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy. 

913 West Illinois Street 77. 

EDWIN GRANT DEXTER, Ph.D. Professor of Education. 

90S West Green Street, U. 

ISABEL BEVIER, Ph.M. Professor of Household Science. 

802 West Green Street, V. 

CYRIL GEORGE HOPKINS, M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Agron- 
omy. 1001 South Wright Street, C. 

MORGAN BROOKS, Ph.B., M.E., Professor of Electrical En- 
gineering. 1012 West Oregon Street, U. 

HERBERT WINDSOR MUMFORD, B.S., Professor of Animal 
Husbandry. 608 South Mathews Avenue, II. 

JOSEPH CULLEN BLAIR, Professor of Pomology. 

810 West Oregon Street, U. 

THOMAS EDWARD OLIVER, Ph.D., Professor of Romanic 
Languages. 

GEORGE HENRY MEYER, A.M., Assistant Professor of the 
German Language and Literature. 912 California Avenue, U. 

HARRY SANDS GRINDLEY, Sc.D., Associate Professor of 
Chemistry. 918 West Green Street, U. 



11 



LOCATION AND HISTORY 



LOCATION 



The University of Illinois is situated in Champaign 
County, in the eastern central part of the state, between the 
cities of Urbana and Champaign, and within the corporate 
limits of the former. It is one hundred and twenty-eight 
miles south of Chicago, at the junction of the Illinois Cen- 
tral, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis, and 
the Wabash railroads. The country around is a rich and 
prosperous agricultural region. The cities of Urbana and 
Champaign have, together, a population of about 17,000. 

HISTORY 

The University was incorporated February 28, 1867, un- 
der the name of the Illinois Industrial University, and was 
opened to students March 21, 1868. At first only men were 
received, but on March 9, 1870, women were also admitted. 
The institution is in part endowed by the national govern- 
ment, and is maintained by the State of Illinois. The present 
value of property is estimated at $2,600,000. In 1885 the 
state legislature changed the name to the University of Illi- 
nois. In the same year also, by act of the legislature, the 
State Laboratory of Natural History was transferred from 
the Illinois State Normal University. The Agricultural 
Experiment Station^ founded upon an annual congressional 
donation, was established in 1887. The Graduate School 
dates from 1892. May 1, 1896, the Chicago College of Phar- 
macy, located at 465 State street, Chicago, became the 
School of Pharmacy of the University of Illinois. A School 
of Law organized in 1897 became the College of Law in 



12 

1900. The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Chicago, 
Corner Congress and Honore Streets, became, April 21, 
1897, the College of Medicine of the University of Illinois; 
the instruction in music was reorganized and the School of 
Music was established, and the State Library School was i 
opened in September of that year. The School (now Colleye) 
of Dentistry, Corner of Harrison and Honore Streets, Chi- 
cago, was opened October 3, 1901. 

The corps of instruction for the year 1903-1904, not 
counting administrative officers, includes 101 professors, 
42 associate professors, 41 assistant professors and 136 in- 
structors and assistants. The total number of students for 
the same year is 3594, of whom 2876 are men and 718 
women. 2552 are connected with the departments in Ur- 
bana, and 1042 in Chicago. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE UNIVERSITY 
For the purpose of more efficient administration, the 
University is divided into several colleges and schools. 
This division does not imply that the colleges and schools 
are educationally separate. They are interdependent, and 
together form a unit. In addition to the courses mentioned 
as given in each college and school, instruction in military 
science and physical training is provided. The organiza- 
tion is as follows: 



I. The College of Literature and Arts. 

II. The College of Engineering. 

III. The College of Science. 

IY. The College of Agriculture. 

Y. The Graduate School. 

YI. The School of Library Science. 

VII. The School of Music. 

VIII. The College of Law. 

IX. The College of Medicine. 

X. The School of Pharmacy. 

XL The College of Dentistry. 






13 



THE COLLEGE OF LITERATURE AND ARTS 

The College of Literature and Arts offers a wide range 
of subjects in philosophy and the arts, including: 

1. The ancient classical languages. 

2. English literature and language, including rhetoric. 

3. The Romanic languages, including French, Italian and 
Spanish. 

4. The Germanic languages, including German, Scandinavian 
and Danish. 

5. The political and social sciences, including history, eco- 
nomics, sociology, anthropology, and science of government. 

6. Courses of training for business. 

7. Philosophical subjects, including philosophy, mathemat- 
ics, psychology, education, and ethics. 

8. Courses in library science, consisting of three years' col- 
lege work, followed by the first year in the School of Library 
Science. 

THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

The College of Engineering offers courses — 

1. In Architecture. 

2. In Architectural Engineering. 

3. In Civil Engineering. 

4. In Electrical Engineering. 

5. In Mechanical Engineering. 

6. In Municipal and Sanitary Engineering. 

7. In Eailway Engineering. 

THE COLLEGE OF SCIENCE 

The College of Science offers courses in — 

1. General Science. 

2. Chemistry. . 

3. Education. 

4. Household Science. 

5. Library Science. 

6. Mathematics. 

7. Physics. 

8. Studies Preliminary to Medicine. 



U 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

The College of Agriculture offers courses in — 

1. Agronomy. 

2 Animal Husbandry. 

3. Dairy Husbandry. 

4. Horticulture. 

5. Household Science. 

6. Veterinary Science. 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

The Graduate School offers courses in twenty-seven dis- 
tinct subjects, as follows: agronomy, animal husbandry, 
architecture, botany, chemistry, civil engineering, eco- 
nomics, education, electrical engineering, English lan- 
guage and literature, French, geology, German, Greek, 
history, horticulture, household science, Latin, mathe- 
matics, mechanical engineering, municipal and sanitary 
engineering, philosophy, physics, physiology, psychologj^, 
thremmatology, and zoology. 

The courses of instruction under these subjects are here- 
after described. 

THE SCHOOL OF LIBRARY SCIENCE 

The School of Library Science, or the State Library 

School, offers a course of study extending over five years, 

three of which are in either the College of Literature and 

Arts or the College of Science. The last two years are 

devoted to courses in library science in the Library School. 

The full course leads to the degree of bachelor of library 

science. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

The School of Music offers courses in vocal and instru- 
mental music, leading to the degree of bachelor of music. 

THE COLLEGE OF LAW 
The College of Law offers a course of study leading to 
the degree of bachelor of laws. 



15 

THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 
The College of Medicine offers a course of study leading 
to the degree of doctor of medicine. 

THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
The School of Pharmacy offers a course in all branches 
necessary to a complete scientific and practical knowledge 
of pharmacy, including pharmacy, chemistry, materia med 
ica, botany, physics, and physiology. The course leads to 
the degree of graduate in pharmacy. 

THE COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY 

The College of Dentistry offers a course leading to the 
degree of doctor of dental surgery. 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

The land occupied by the University embraces about 
220 acres. The campus is roomy and presents a very 
attractive appearance. The main buildings, 20 in num- 
ber, include the Library Building containing stack-room 
space for 150,000 books, reading rooms, seminary rooms, 
administrative offices and quarters for the Library 
School; University Hall, a large structure of four main 
floors containing the administrative offices and class 
rooms of the College of Literature and Arts and the 
rooms of the School of Music; the Law Building in 
which are the offices, lecture rooms, moot court room, 
library, etc., of the College of Law; Natural History Hall 
in which are housed the departments of botany, zoology, 
physiology, and geology and the apartments of the State 
Laboratory of Natural History; the Astronomical Observ- 
atory', the Chemical Laboratory of three stories with a 
large lecture room, a number of large and several small 
laboratory apartments, supply room, offices, etc.; the 
Agricultural Building of four independent structures 



16 

built around an open court providing rooms for the admin- 
istrative offices of the College and of the Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station, and for the departments of agronomy, an- 
imal husbandry, dairy husbandry, horticulture, veterinary 
science and household science; the Engineering Hall of four 
stories devoted to the offices, class rooms, drawing rooms, 
laboratories, etc., of the departments of architecture, 
civil, electrical, mechanical and municipal engineering and 
of physics; the Wood Shop, for instruction and practice 
with wood working tools and machines; the Metal Shops 
for work with metal working tools and machines; the 
Mechanical and Electrical Engineering Laboratory, the 
Laboratory of Applied Mechanics; the Central Heating 
Station; the Pumping Station from which the University 
is abundantly supplied with water; the Armory having 
one grand hall 100 by 150 feet; the Menus Gymnasium, — a 
three-story structure providing all the facilities of a 
modern gymnasium; and the Presidents House, A Wo- 
man's Building is in course of construction. The build- 
ings for the Colleges of Medicine and of Dentistry and 
for the School of Pharmacy are in Chicago, and furnish 
excellent quarters for these important organizations. 

LABORATORIES AND COLLECTIONS 
SCIENCE LABORATORIES 

The botanical, geological, physiological, and zoological 
laboratories are in Natural History Hall. 

The chemical laboratory occupies the building of the same 
name, already described. 

The physical laboratory is in Engineering Hall. It is 
provided with piers, a constant temperature room, and 
other conveniences for measurement work. 

The psychological laboratory, in University Hall, is well 



17 

provided with apparatus of many different kinds for use in 
experimental study, research, and instruction. 

A laboratory of economic geology, for the investigation of 
clays, lime and cement-making materials, building stones, 
road metal, and all other mineral substances of economic 
value, has been equipped with the necessary appliances for 
such investigations. 

ENGINEERING LABORATORIES 

The cement laboratory of the department of civil engineer- 
ing occupies rooms in Engineering Hall. 

The electrical engineering laboratory occupies space on 
three floors of the Mechanical and Electrical Engineering 
Laboratory. 

The 'mechanical engineering laboratory occupies the rear 
wing of the Mechanical and Electrical Engineering Lab- 
oratory. 

The hydraulic laboratory and the materials testing lab- 
oratory occupy the Laboratory of Applied Mechanics. 

SPECIAL LABORATORIES FOR RESEARCH 

The chemical laboratory of the Agricultural Experiment 
Station and the student laboratory 'for the study of fertility 
of soils are situated on the third floor of the Agricultural 
Building, as are also the bacteriological laboratory and the 
physical laboratory for the examination of soils. 

The materials and hydraulic laboratories occupy the new 
Laboratory of Applied Mechanics. 

The laboratory rooms of the State Laboratory of Nat- 
ural History are in Natural History Hall. 

A Biological Station, equipped for field and experimental 
work in aquatic biology, is maintained on the Illinois River 
by the State Laboratory of Natural History. It has its 
separate staff, but is open to students of the University at 



18 

all times, on application, and daring the summer months 
to special students not connected with the University. 

A laboratory for sanitary water analysis has been 
equipped with all necessary appliances, and chemical inves- 
tigation of the water supplies of the state is carried on. 

COLLECTIONS 

AGRICULTURAL 

The various agricultural departments maintain collec- 
tions illustrative of their work, prominent among which 
are those showing typical specimens of standard varieties 
of corn, wax models of fruit and vegetables, an extensive 
horticultural herbarium, specimens of many breeds of live 
stock, a large collection of farm machinery, and exhibits 
of negatives and samples showing progress of certain in- 
vestigations, as with fruit and with corn. 

BOTANICAL 

The herbarium contains about 50,000 mounted specimens 
of plants. The flora of North America is fairly well rep- 
resented, the collection of species of flowering plants 
indigenous to Illinois is particularly complete, and a con- 
siderable collection of foreign species has been made. The 
collections of fungi amount to 32,000 named specimens, 
and include a full set of those most injurious to other plants, 
causing rusts, smuts, moulds, etc. There are specimens of 
wood from 200 species of native trees and shrubs, which 
well illustrate the varieties of native wood. 

Plaster casts represent fruits of many of the leading vari- 
eties, as well as interesting specimens of morphology, show- 
ing peculiarities of growth, effects of cross-cultivation, etc. 

ENGINEERING 

The following departments of the College of Engineer- 



19 

ing have made extensive and valuable collections, which 
are placed in rooms in Engineering Hall. 

Architecture 
A large number of specimens of stone, bricks, terra cotta, 
sanitary fixtures, casts of moldings and of ornament have 
been accumulated, together with some excellent specimens 
of industrial arts, models of structures, working drawings 
of important buildings, 4,588 lantern slides, 20,000 plates 
and photographs, an excellent working library, and a large 
classified collection of plates from architectural journals. 

Civil Engineering 
The civil engineering department has a large room con- 
taining samples of iron, steel, wood, brick, and stone; 
materials for roads and pavements; models of arches and 
trusses, one of the latter being full-sized details of an actual 
modern railroad bridge. The department also possesses a 
very large collection of photographs and blue-print work- 
ing drawings of bridges, metal skeleton buildings, masonry 
structures, and standard railroad construction. 

Electrical Engineering 
The department has a collection of samples illustrating 
standard practice in the industrial applications of electric- 
ity. There is also a rapidly growing collection of lantern 
slides, photographs, blue-prints, drawings, pamphlets, and 
other engineering data. 

Mechanical Engineering 
This department has among other things a partial set 
of Reuleaux models, together with models of valve gears, 
sections of steam pumps, injectors, valves, skeleton steam 
and water gauges, standard packings, steam-pipe cover- 
ings, and drop f'orgings. There are also fine examples of 
castings, perforated metal, defective boiler plates, and 



20 

sets of drills, with numerous samples of oil, iron, and 
steel. A large number of working drawings from lead- 
ing firms and from the United States Navy Department 
forms a valuable addition to the above collections. 

GEOLOGICAL 

Lithology is represented by type collections of rocks 
(9,000 specimens), arranged to illustrate Rosenbusch;from 
Voight and Hochgesang, L. Eger, and A. Kranz; a type 
collection from Ward; 1,000 thin sections of rocks and 
minerals; a large number of ornamental building stones; 
a stratigraphic collection to illustrate Illinois geology, 
and a collection of Illinois soils (104). 

The Mineralogical collection is especially rich in 
rock-forming minerals, ores, and materials of economic 
value. It contains over 12,000 specimens carefully se- 
lected to meet the wants of the student, and 575 crystal 
models. 

The paleontological collection (49,000 specimens) con- 
tains representative fossils from the entire geologic ser- 
ies, but is especially rich in paleozoic forms. It embraces 
the private collections of A. H. Worthen (including 742 
type specimens); Tyler McWhorter; Mr. Hertzer; 200 
thin sections of corals; the Ward collection of casts, and 
a considerable number of special collections representing 
the' fauna and flora of particular groups. 

LIBEARY ECONOMY 

A collection of books and phamplets on library 
science, of library reports and catalogs, of mounted sam- 
ples showing methods of administration in all depart- 
ments, and of labor-saving devices and fittings has been 
made, and is arranged by the Dewey Decimal classifica- 
tion in the Library School seminary room. 



21 

PEDAGOGICAL 
In the rooms of the department of education in Uni- 
versity Hall is a considerable collection of illustrative 
material from the manual training departments of various 
schools; photographs of school buildings, drawings and 
construtive work by pupils in the public schools, and the 
nucleus of a representative collection of apparatus for the 

school laboratory. 

ZOOLOGICAL 

The zoological collections have been specially selected 
and prepared to illustrate the courses of study in natural 
history, and to present a synoptical view of the zoology 
of the state. 

The mounted mammals comprise an unusually large 
and instructive collection of the ruminants of our coun- 
try, including male and female moose, elk, bison, deer, 
antelope, etc., and also several quadrumana, large carniv- 
ora and fur-bearing animals, numerous rodents, good 
representative marsupials, cetaceans, edentates, and inono- 
tremes. Fifty-nine species of this class are represented 
by one hundred and one specimens and all the others, 
excepting the Sirenia, are represented by mounted skele- 
tons. There is also a series of dissections in alcohol, 
illustrating the comparative anatomy of the group. 

The collection of mounted birds includes representa- 
tives of all the orders and families of North America, 
together with a number of characteristic tropical, Bor- 
nean and New Zealand forms. The collection is practi- 
cally complete for Illinois species. There is also a fine 
collection of the nests and eggs of Illinois birds. A series 
of several hundred unmounted skins is available for the 
practical study of species, and the internal anatomy is 
shown in alcoholic dissections, and in mounted skeletons 
of all the orders. 



The cold-blooded vertebrates are represented by a 
series of mounted skins of the larger species, both terres- 
trial and marine; mounted skeletons of typical represen- 
tatives of the principal groups; alcoholic specimens; both 
entire and dissected, and casts. The alcoholics include 
series of the reptiles, amphibians, and fishes, the latter 
comprising about 300 species. The dissections illustrate 
the internal anatomy of the principal groups. The casts 
represent about seventy five species, nearly all fishes. 

The mollusca are illustrated by alcoholic specimens 
of all classes and orders, and dissections showing the 
internal anatomy of typical forms. There are several 
thousand shells belonging to 1,700 species. The collec- 
tion of Illinois shells is fair but incomplete. 

The collection of insects has been greatly extended 
and enriched by the Bolter Collection, donated to the 
University by the executors of the estate of the late An- 
dreas Bolter, of Chicago, which now contains over 16,000 
species, represented by about 120,000 specimens, named, 
labled, and systematically arranged. 

The lower invertebrates are represented by several 
hundred dried specimens and alcoholics, and by a large 
series of the famous Blaschka glass models. 

The embryology of vertebrates and invertebrates is 
illustrated by several sets of Ziegler wax models, and 
numerous series of slides, sections, and other prepara- 
tions. 

In addition to the above, the extensive collections of 
the State Laboratory of Natural History are available for 
illustrative purposes, as well as for original investigation 
by advanced students. 

ART GALLERY 

The University Art Gallery was the gift of citizens 



23 

of Champaign and Urbana. It occupies a room in the 
basement of the Library Building, and furnishes an ex- 
cellent collection of models for students of art. In sculp- 
ture it embraces thirteen full-size casts of celebrated 
statues, forty statues of reduced size, and a large num- 
ber of busts and bas-reliefs, making in all over 400 
pieces. It includes also hundreds of large autotypes, 
photographs, and fine engravings, representing many of 
the great masterpieces of painting of nearly all the mod- 
ern schools, and a gallery of historical portraits, mostly 
large French lithographs, copied from the great national 
portrait galleries of France. 

Other collections of special value to art students em- 
brace a large number of casts of ornament from the 
Alhambra and other Spanish buildings, presented by the 
Spanish government; a set of casts from Germany, illus- 
trating German renaissance ornament; a series of art 
works from the Columbian Exposition; large numbers of 
miscellaneous casts, models, prints, and drawings, such 
as are usually found in the best art schools, and a model 
in plaster and a complete set of drawings of a competitive 
design by Henry Lord Gay for a monument to be erected 
in Rome, commemorative of Victor Emmanuel, first king 

of Italy. 

LIBRAEIES 

The general University library, the library of the 
State Laboratory of Natural History, and that of the Col- 
lege of Law are all at the University in Urbana. The 
libraries of the Colleges of Medicine and Dentistry and of 
the School of Pharmacy are in Chicago. 

The general University library contains 63,724 vol- 
umes and 14,512 pamphlets. The reading room contains 
755 periodicals. The library of the State Laboratory of 
Natural History contains 5,350 volumes and 15,850 pamph- 



24 

lets. The Library of the College of Law contains the 
Federal and State Reports, the leading text- books, and a 
line of leading periodicals. The department of education 
has made a special collection of about 1,500 books and 
5,000 pamphlets, which are kept in the rooms of the 
department in University Hall. This collection contains 
a very good assortment of modern text-books, and copies 
of the courses of study of nearly all the large city school 
systems. 

The Quine Library of the College of Medicine practi- 
cally contains every book of reference required by med- 
ical students and all of the important medical periodicals. 

The general library at the University is open daily, 
except Sunday, from 8 a. m. until 5 p. m. and from 6:30 
p. m. until 9 p. m. on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 
and Thursdays. The reading rooms are open from 8 a. 
m. until 9 p. m. on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 
and Thursdays, and until 5 p. m. Fridays and Saturdays. 

The Public Library of the City of Champaign con- 
tains the valuable library of western history collected by 
Edward G. Mason, Esq., long President of the Chicago 
Historical Society. The collection is accessible to Uni- 
versity students. 



25 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Thomas J. Burrill, Ph.D., LL.D., Dean. 
HISTORY 

The Graduate School was established in 1892, for the 
purpose of offering facilities for advanced study and 
research to graduates in a more systematic way than had 
hitherto been done in the University. In 1894 the School 
was placed in the general charge of the newly organized 
Council of Administration and the office of Dean was es- 
tablished. To the Dean was assigned the executive or 
administrative duties required. Graduate instruction had 
been given in certain departments of the University, and 
second, or master's degrees had been annually conferred 
during several years before the establishment of the 
Graduate School, but no conditions had been previously 
formulated upon which the doctor's degree (Doctor of 
Philosophy) would be given. The first publication of the 
requirements for this degree appeared in the Catalog for 
the year 1893-4 and the conditions then announced have 
since remained in force. The degree however, was not 
conferred until 1903, when two candidates successfully 
passed the prescribed requirements. 

In order further to promote graduate study the pro- 
vision was made when the School was established that its 
members should pay no fees of any kind and four fellow- 
ships were created each with a stipend of $400. Later, 
two more fellowships of the same value were added in 
the same way by the trustees. In 1896 these were changed 
to eight fellowships of $300 each. In 1904 the payment 
by graduates of the same fees required of undergraduates 
was ordered, except that fellows continue excused from 
such payments. 



26 

ADMISSION AND KEGISTRATION 
Graduates of the University of Illinois, and of other 
colleges and universities of approved standing, may be 
admitted to membership in the Graduate School upon 
presentation of their credentials. Other persons suitably 
qualified may gain admission by special vote of the Coun- 
cil of Administration upon such conditions as may be 
imposed in each case. To gain admission to particular 
graduate courses or departments the special preparation 
for this must be found sufficient, and an advanced degree 
for which candidacy is sought must be in line with the 
bachelor degree received. Candidates for admission may 
secure application blanks from the Dean or from the Reg- 
istrar of the University, and these, properly filled out, 
should be filed, together with such documentary matter 
as may be presented, showing qualifications for member- 
ship in the School, with the former officer. This should 
be done not later than the time set for registration in 
September. Admission may be granted at other times, 
but the time limit required for decrees counts from the 
date of the certificate of membership. 

With the exceptions named below, all members of the 
Graduate School are required to be in regular attend- 
ance at the University, and to do all the work for which 
they are registered in the departments to which such work 
belongs. In case of absence on leave, or when absence is 
necessary to carry on investigations included in approved 
courses of study, the requirement of continuous residence 
may be modified by the Council of Administration. 

Graduates of this University may be admitted to non- 
resident membership in the Graduate School, as candi- 
dates for second or masters' degrees. In this case cor- 
respondence should first be addressed to the head of the 
department in charge of the major subject desired. All 



27 

members of the School who have completed the residence 
required for advance degrees may register as non-residents 
while completing the work required for such degrees. 

Members of the Graduate School register with the 
Dean during the registration days, at the beginning of 
the collegiate year. 

Those only are enrolled as members of the Graduate 
School who enter upon or pursue approved graduate 
work as explained under "Studies and Examinations" 
below. Resident graduates who are candidates for bach- 
elor degrees are not included, neither are those who, not 
working for any degree, have registered without a major 
subject approved as graduate work. 

STUDIES AND EXAMINATIONS 

As far as can be indicated by a statement of time, full 
work for a graduate student consists in the use of forty- 
five hours a week in the lecture rooms, laboratories, etc., 
and in private study, equal to 30 semester hours'' credit, 
exclusive of the preparation of a thesis. A semester hour 
is the credit given for one study on which the student is 
supposed to spend 3 hours of time each day 5 days a week 
for 18 weeks. Assignments of work are made upon this 
basis; but great variations naturally result from the sub- 
ject-matter in hand, and from the abilities of individuals. 

Each student must select one principal line of study, 
and upon this major subject at least one-half, 15 "hours," 
and in the subjects of the College of Engineering at least 
two-thirds, 20 "hours", of his work must be done; and 
any greater proportion of his time, up to the whole of it, 
may thus be devoted if proper approval is had. When 
work upon the selected major subject is not arranged to 
require all of the student's attention, he must choose one 
or two minor subjects, as may be necessary to complete a 
full course of study, 30 u hours". Usually, at least one 



28 

minor subject should be taken. Not more than two may 
be taken at the same time. 

The major study must be approved as graduate work 
for this University, preceded by an amount of undergrad- 
uate preparation specified in connection with the courses 
of study or determined by the officers in charge. The 
minor subjects may, under approval, be chosen from the 
offerings to graduates, or from undergraduate courses of 
advanced grade, except that all work must be selected from 
graduate offerings in the subjects of the College of Engin- 
eering. In these the major line of study must be either a 
single subject or a combination of related subjects. But 
all candidates for advanced degrees must direct their selec- 
tions toward some well-defined end, determined for the most 
part by the character and purpose of the major study. 

All courses of study leading to degrees in the Graduate 
School are subject to approval, first, by the head of the de- 
partment of the University in which the major subject for 
each student belongs; second, by the Dean of the College 
including such department; and, third, by the Dean of the 
Graduate School. The signatures of the heads of depart- 
ments in which chosen minor subjects belong must also be 
obtained before the list reaches the Dean of the Graduate 
School. The lists of studies, as finally approved, are depos- 
ited with the Registrar of the University. No changes may 
subsequently be made except under the same line of approv- 
als, but extension of time may be arranged with the profess- 
ors concerned and with the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Examinations are required in all subjects, and reports 
upon these are made to the Registrar of the University. 
Graduate students in undergraduate classes are examined 
with these classes. 

The head of the department in which the student does 
his major work is charged with the direction and supervis- 



29 

ion of such major work, and, in a general way, with the 
supervision of the student's entire course of study. He 
fixes the time and method of all examinations not other- 
wise provided for, sees that they are properly conducted, 
and reports results to the Registrar. It is his duty also to 
keep the Dean of the Graduate School informed concerning 
all matters affecting the interests of the student, and of the 
School in connection therewith. 

DEGREES 
No degrees are given for study in absentia, except that 
graduates of this University, who become members of the 
Graduate School and reside elsewhere, may receive a mas- 
ter's degree upon the completion of their courses of study 
within not less than three years of the date of registration. 
Advanced degrees are conferred by the Trustees of the 
University only upon recommendation of the Senate, based 
upon information furnished by the Council of Administra- 
tion. 

Second Degrees 

The second degrees conferred by this University are as 
follows: 

Master of Arts, after Bachelor of Arts. 

Master of Science, after Bachelor of Science, in courses 
in the College of Agriculture. 

Master of Architecture, after Bachelor of Science, in 
courses of Architecture and Architectural Engineering. 

Civil Engineer, after Bachelor of Science, in the course 
in Civil Engineering. 

Electrical Engineer, after Bachelor of Science, in the 
course in Electrical Engineering. 

Mechanical Engineer, after Bachelor of Science, in the 
course in Mechanical Engineering. 

Pharmaceutical Chemist, after Graduate in Pharmacy. 

All candidates for second degrees are required to regis- 



30 

ter in the Graduate School, to conform to the conditions 
outlined under "Admission and Registration," and "Stud- 
ies and Examinations" (pp. 26 and 27); to pursue an ap- 
proved course of study for one academic year in resi- 
dence, or, in the case of graduates of this University, for 
three years in absentia; and to pass satisfactory examina- 
tions upon all the studies of the approved course. 

Each candidate for a second degree must present an 
acceptable thesis in the line of his major subject of study. 
The subject of this thesis must be announced to the Dean 
of the Graduate School not later than the first Monday in 
November of the academic year in which the course is to 
be completed. The completed thesis, upon regulation 
paper, must be presented, with the certified approval of 
the professor in charge, to the Council of Administration 
not later than June 1st. 

The period of required study begins from the date of 
registration in the Graduate School. 

Doctor's Degree 

The Degree of Doctor of Philosophy may be conferred 
upon any member of the Graduate School of not less 
than three years' standing who shall have reached high 
attainments in scholarship, including a sufficient knowl- 
edge of the French and German languages to serve the 
purposes of research in his principal specialty, who shall 
have shown marked ability in some line of literary or 
scientific investigation, and shall have presented a thesis 
giving clear indications of such scholarship and of such 
power of research. At least the first two, or the last one, 
of the three years of study must be in residence at the 
University, and the entire course of study must be in ac- 
cordance with the regulations of the Graduate School. 

The time and study required for a master's degree may 
be included in the three years required, but approval of a 



31 

course of study for a doctor's degree must be upon the 
condition that the candidate is prepared through his bacca- 
laureate work, or otherwise, to enter at once upon advanced 
studies in the line of his major subject, and that work on 
his major subject be continued through the three years. 

The final examination of a candidate for the doctor's 
degree is conducted by a committee consisting of the head 
of the department under which the major subject has 
been pursued, as chairman, and of not less than two addi- 
tional members of the Senate of the University, appointed 
for the purpose by the Council of Administration. This 
examination covers the subjects of the course approved 
for the degree, but is especially searching upon that on 
which the major work has been 'done. 

Each candidate for a doctor's degree must announce to 
the Dean of the Graduate School a thesis subject not later 
than the first Monday in November of the academic year at 
the close of which the award of the degree is expected. A 
fair copy of the thesis must be submitted, with a certified 
approval of the committee on examinations, to the Coun- 
cil of Administration not later than the first day of June. 
If the thesis is approved by the Council the candidate 
must have it printed and must deposit not less than one 
hundred copies with the librarian of the University. 

FELLOWSHIPS 

The Trustees of the University have established a num- 
ber of fellowships, each with a stipend of three hundred 
dollars, payable in ten monthly installments. 

The rules governing appointments to these fellowships 
are as follows: 

1. The purpose of these fellowships shall be to promote ad- 
vanced scholarship and original research in the University. 

2. The fellowships shall be open to graduates of this and 
similar institutions. Those who are to complete an under 



32 

gradute course previous to the academic year for which 
appointments are made shall be eligible, with others, as 
candidates. 

3. Nominations to fellowships, accompanied by assign- 
ments to special departments of the University, shall be 
made by the Council of Administration to the Trustees of 
the University, upon applications received by the Presi- 
dent of the University each year not later than the first 
day of February. These nominations shall be made at a 
meeting of the Council called for that purpose within the 
month of February. The appointments by the Trustees 
are made at their regular meeting in March, and shall 
take effect the first day of the following September. Va- 
cancies may be filled by similar nominations and appoint- 
ments at other times. 

4. Nominations to fellowships shall be made upon the 
grounds of worthiness of character, scholastic attain- 
ments, and promise of success in the principal line of 
study or research to which the candidate proposes to devote 
himself. Consideration shall also be given to the probable 
value or usefulness of the services of the candidate as an 
assistant in instruction, but this shall not be deemed the 
primary object of the appointment. Other things being 
equal, preference is given to those graduates of this Univer- 
sity who have pursued a specialized or group course.* 

5. Candidates must present, with their applications, 
full information concerning themselves and their qualifi- 
cations for advanced study and research work, including 
any written or printed essays or results of investigation, 
and must name the subject in which they wish to do their 
major work. 



*A11 members of the Colleges of Engineering* and Agriculture, of the 
chemical and mathematical groups in the College of Science, of the College 
of Law, and of the Schools of Library Science and Music, are considered 
as pursuing specialized courses. 



33 

6. Fellowships are good for one year, but appointments 
may be renewed to the same person. An appointment as hon- 
orary fellow, without stipend, may be made as specified for 
paid fellowships in the ca se of anyone who has held a regular 
fellowship and has shown distinguished merit in his work. 

7. Fellows shall be constituted members of the Gradu- 
ate School, shall have all of the privileges and bear all of 
the responsibilities of such membership. Each regular 
fellow may be called upon to render service in instruction 
throughout the year in the department in which his major 
subject lies, equal to one hour daily of class instruction 
or to two hours daily of laboratory supervision. This ser- 
vice will receive such credit as the Council of Adminis- 
tration may determine in each case. Blank forms for ap- 
plication may be obtained by addressing the Registrar, or 
the Dean of the Graduate School. 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
Following the description of each course of instruction 
will be found the necessary requirements, if any, for 
admission to that particular course. 

Credit is reckoned in semester ''hours, " or simply 
"hours." An "hour" is one class period a week for one 
semester, each class period pre- supposing two hours' prep- 
aration by the student, or it is the equivalent in labora- 
tory, shop or drawing room. 

The semester, the days, and the class period or periods 
during which each course is given, and the number of 
"hours" per semester for which the course counts, are 
shown after each course, as follows: The semester is indi- 
cated by the Roman numerals I. , II. ; the days by the initial 
letters of the days of the week; the class period or periods 
(of which there are nine each day, numbered consecutively 
from one to nine), by Arabic figures; and the "hours" or 
amount of credit, by Arabic figures in parenthesis. 



34 



SUBJECTS OF THE COLLEGE OF LITERATURE 
AND ARTS 

ECONOMICS 
(Including Commerce and Industry). 
The work of the department of economics is expanded 
in the direction both of societal economics and industrial 
economics. A graduate student may pursue work in 
either line. No student will be permitted to elect econom- 
ics as a major unless he has had a thorough course in the 
principles. Students who are not considered sufficiently well 
grounded will be required to take an elementary course 
in conjunction with, or preparatory to, their other work, 
but it cannot be counted towards an advance degree. 

The department is thorougly equipped both in library 
and in staff for the training of students in economic re- 
search in social and industrial lines. The Library con- 
tains complete sets of all important economic serials, in 
English, French, and German, is well equipped in pract- 
ically all important lines of economic research, and has 
abundant material in several. 

The opportunities for work in statistics, theoretical and 
practical, are unusually good. The University possesses 
a number of calculating machines of various kinds which 
are accessible to advanced students in their research 
work. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

3. Money and Banking. — The history and theory of mon- 
ey and banking, and the monetary history of the United States. 
II. ; M., W., F.; 4; (3). Assistant Professor Weston. 

Required: Economics 1, or 2 and 7. 

4. Financial History of the United States. — A brief 
survey of the fiscal systems of the American colonies followed by 
a study of national finances from the beginning of the American 



35 



Revolution down to the present time. L; M., W., F.; 2; (3). 
Assistant Professor Hammond. 
Bequired: Economics 1. 

5. Public Finance.— A study of the principles which should 
be followed in making public expenditures and in securing pub- 
lic revenues. II.; Tu.,Th.; 4; (2). Assistant Professor Hammond. 

Bequired: Economics 1. 

6. Taxation.— An investigation into the methods of taxa- 
tion in the various American Commonwealths. II. ; M., W., F.; 
2; (3). Assistant Professor Hammond. 

Bequiredji Economics 5. 

8. The Money Market.— An advanced course dealing with 
rates of exchange, functions of bill broker and banker, causes of 
fluctuations in rates of discount, the concentration of financial 
dealings at such centers as New York and London, international 
payments and the determination of rates of foreign exchange. 
II.; Tu., Th.; 3; (2). Professor Kinley. 

Bequired: Economics 3 and 9. 

9. Banking. — A course in the study of practical banking, 
with special reference to the United States, England, Germany, 
France and the Orient. I.; Tu., Th.; 7; (2). Assistant Professor 
Weston. 

Bequired: Economics 3. 

10. Corporation Management and Finance. — The growth 
of corporations; their organization and securities, position and 
relations of stockholders and directors, analysis of reports, stock 
speculation, relation of industrial corporations to international 
competition, receiverships and reorganizations, social and polit- 
ical effects. I.; M., W., F.; 2; (3). Professor Eobinson. 

Bequired: Economics 1, or 2 and 7 or 22. 

11. Industrial Consolidations. — The development of 
industrial consolidations, their causes and forms; the promotion, 
financiering, incorporation and capitalization of corporate con- 
solidations; monopoly prices and monopoly methods; the ability 
of trusts to affect prices, wages, interest and profits; and the 
proposed plans for controlling trusts, such as publicity, taxation 
of profits, and public ownership. II.; M., W., F.; 2; (3). Pro- 
fessor Robinson. 

Bequired: Economics 10. 

12. The Labor Problem. — The labor movement and its 



36 



social significance. The progress of the laboring classes, strikes, 
arbitration, labor organizations, and similar topics, which are 
studied, show the general character of the course. L; W., F.; 
4; (3). Professor Kinley. 

Bequired: Economics 1. [Not given in 1904-05.] 

13. Railway Management. — This course considers from 
the administrative standpoint railways as factors in the social 
and industrial development of the United States and treats of 
the following topics: — (1) Historical: conditions of commerce and 
industry previous to the advent of the railways; primitive meth- 
ods of transportation, etc. (2) Geographical: the economic loca- 
tion of railways, etc. (3) Organization; charter and franchises; 
capital stock; directors and stockholders; departments; the dis- 
tribution of authority and responsibility; (4) Traffic manage- 
ment; (5) Financial: basis of capitalization; use of stocks and 
bonds; stock watering; distribution of earnings; reports and their 
interpretation, etc.; (6) Legal: rights and duties of railways; 
their status under the common and statute law; relation to leased 
lines; to employes; to patrons; taxation; public control through 
commissions. I.; M., W., F.; 4; (3). Professor Robinson. 

Bequired: Economics 1, or 2 and either 7, 16 or 22. From 
junior and senior engineers economics 2, only, will be required. 

14. Railway Systems. — This course is a continuation of 
course 13. II.; M., W., F.; 4; (3). Professor Robinson. 

Bequired: Economics 13. 

17. Sociology. — This course deals with the principles un- 
derlying social organization, and with the nature and develop- 
ment of social institutions. Special attention is given to the 
study of the family, the state and to race assimilation in the 
United States. The latter part of the course treats practical 
problemsof chaiity and crime. II., M., W., F.; 1; (3). Assist- 
ant Professor Hammond. 

Bequired: At least 28 hours of University credit. 

18. Economic Seminary. — For investigation and for the 
study of current economic literature. I., II.; arrange time. 
Professors Kinley, Fisk, Robinson, Hammond, Weston. 

20. History of Economic Thought. — The history of the 
development of economic theory since the sixteenth century. I., 
II.; 7; (2). Professor Kinley. 

Bequired: 10 hours in economics. 






37 

21. Socialism and Social Reform.— II.; M., W.,F.; 7; (3). 
Assistant Professor Weston. 

Bequired: Economics 1, or 2 and 7. 

23. Statistics. — A course in descriptive statistics. The 
course may be taken by itself, but is better taken with the first 
half of course 24. II. ; F.; 7; (1). Assistant Professor Hammond. 

Bequired: Economics 1 or 2. 

24. Statistics. — Students of economics should take this 
course and 23 together. Those who do not wish the mathemat- 
ical theory of probability may drop out of the class when that 
part of the subject is reached. For them the mathematical re- 
quirement for entrance is not enforced, and courses 23 and 24 
count for four hours' credit. All who take the course must take 
both parts of it, as described under mathematics 26, which see. 

Bequired: Economics I, or 2 and 7. 

27. History of Commerce.— A general survey of commerce 
from ancient times, with special stress on the growth of com- 
merce since the discovery of America. L; M., W., F.; 3; (3). 
Professor Fisk. 

Bequired: Economics 1, 7 and 26. 

28. Domestic Commerce and Commercial Politics. — A 
comparative study of the various forms of commercial organiza- 
tion, such as general wholesale and retail trade, department, 
co-operative, and company stores, peddling, huckstering, and 
hawking,booths, auctions, commercial agents, including com- 
mercial travelers, and the coupon system. L; M., W., F.; 3; 
(3). Professor Fisk. 

Bequired: Economics 1, 7 and 26. [Not given in 1904-05.] 

29. Foreign Commerce and Commercial Politics. — Con- 
tinuation of course 28. A study of the various commercial sys- 
tems (mercantile, free trade, and protective); kinds of tariffs; 
commercial treaties, reciprocity; commercial statistics and bal- 
ances; institutions for furthering export trade (commercial mu- 
seums and bureaus of information, 'sample houses, consular reports, 
etc.) II.; M., W., F.; 3; (3). Professor Fisk. 

Bequired: Economics 1, 7 and 26. [Not given in 1904-5.] 

30. History of the Commercial Policy of the United 
States. — An historical study of all those measures, such as tariff 
legislation, commercial treaties, navigation laws, bounties, sub- 



sidies, consular matters, etc., which have an important bearing 
on the commercial side of the foreign relations of the United 
States. I., II. ; M., W., 3; (2). Professor Fisk. 
Bequired; Economics 1, 7, or 22 and 26. 

31. History of the Commercial Kelations of the 
United States. I., II.; M., W.; 4; (2). Professor Fisk. 

Bequired: Economics 30. 

32. Domestic and Foreign Markets of the United 
States. — One hour a week is devoted to a study of the distribu- 
tion and domestic marketing of American products, especially 
farm products, while the second hour is given to a study of for- 
eign markets for American exports. I., II.; W., F.; 4; (2). Pro- 
fessor Fisk. 

Bequired: Economics 28, 29; or 27, 30. 

33. Economics of Insurance. — The historical develop- 
ment of insurance, and an extended discussion of its economic 
aspects. The various forms of insurance— fire, accident, employ- 
ment and life, — from the standpoint of internal organization and 
from that of social service. Eates, policies, investments, corpor- 
ate management, accounting, public supervision, and insurance 
law. I.; arrange time; {2). Professor Robinson. 

Bequired: Economics 10, 24. 

34. Corporation Accounting.— The general principles of 
accounting and auditing in modern business. The report of 
railway, banking and industrial corporations are analyzed. The 
work is supplemented with a series of lectures by practical ac- 
countants. II.; Tu., Th.; 3; (2). Professor Robinson. 

Bequired: Economics 10. 

35. Consular and Diplomatic Service.— A comparative 
study of the consular service of the important countries, and of 
the diplomatic service so far as it affects foreign commerce. 
Special attention is given to the foreign service of the United 
States. I., II.; F.; 4; (1). Professor Fisk. 

Bequired: Economics 30 and 31. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

101. Recent Economic Theory.— For the year 1904-05. 
Theories of Wages and Profits is the subject of study. I., II.; 
arrange time. Professor Kinley. 

102. Historical and Comparative Finance.— This course 



39 

is devoted to original investigation by the student and to reports 
and discussion in class, supplemented with lectures by the in- 
structor. The work is conducted each year along the following 
lines. (1) A comparison of financial theories concerning public 
expenditures, the principles of justice in taxation, the incidence 
of taxes and the relation of taxation to social reform; (2) a com- 
parison to the financial system of the United States with those 
of foreign countries; (3) a comparison of the taxing systems of 
the American commonwealths. For 1904-05 the last named sub- 
ject has been selected. I., II. ; arrange time; (2). Assistant Pro- 
fessor Hammond. 

103. Seminary in Railway Administration.— Advanced 
students in this subject make a detailed study of one of the 
branches of railway administration. I., II.; arrange time; (2) 
Professor Robinson. 

104. Seminary in Commerce.— A study of present inter- 
national commercial relations, with special reference to the trade 
conditions of the United States and the extension of her trade 
to foreign markets. I., II.; arrange time; (2). Professor Fisk. 

EDUCATION 

Under the direction of this department are offered the 
pedagogical and the psychological courses included within 
the University curriculum. In both of these fields of 
study the department is well equipped for graduate in- 
struction. The University Library, besides containing the 
files of nearly all the important serial publications in each, 
is well provided with the general and technical works 
which are essential to advanced study. Besides this, the 
department possesses a pedagogical library of upwards of 
1,000 volumes and 5,000 reports, courses of study, etc., 
covering the general field of education which provides an 
invaluable field for the investigation of problems of school 
organization and administration. For work in psychology 
there is a laboratory, adequate for present needs, consist- 
ing of three rooms (beside a dark room) fully equipped 
with apparatus both for elementary instruction and for 



40 



the prosecution of research within the field of psychology. 
Although the department has no mechanician of its own, it 
has a well furnished work-shop in which the more simple 
pieces of apparatus for special investigation may be con- 
structed and through arrangements with the shops of the 
College of Engineering the more elaborate ones are built. 

Matriculants for major work either in pedagogical or 
psychological courses are supposed to have had at least 
one year's previous study in them. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

A. Pedagogical. 

4. Contemporary Educational Conditions and Move- 
ments in the United States. I ; (2). Professor Dexter. 

5. A Comparative Study of the Secondary School 
Systems of France, Germany, England, and America. 
II; (2) Professor Dexter. 

6. High School Organization and Management. II. ; (3) 

7. Special Methods in Science and Mathematics. I., (2) 

8. Special Methods in Language and History. I.; (2) 
Assistant Professor Colvin. 

9. Educational Psychology. II.; (2). Professor Dexter. 

10. Seminar, Covering General Problems in School 
Management and Supervision. I., II.; (1). Professor Dexter. 

B. Psychological. 

3 and 4. Experimental Psychology.— A full laboratory 
course for the year. I., II.; (5). Professor Dexter and Assistant 
Professor Colvin. 

5. Genetic Psychology. II.; (2). Assistant Prof essor Col- 
vin. 

6. Comparative Psychology. I.; (2). Assistant Professor 
Colvin. 

7. Seminar. I., II.; (1); Assistant Professor Colvin. 

8. The Psychology of the Emotions and the Will. II,; 
(2). Assistant Professor Colvin. 



41 

No courses strictly for graduate students are announced 
by the department, but arrangements are made with such 
students individually and such courses arranged as meet 
the particular needs. University credit varying in amount 
from one to five semester hours is given for this work. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 
The library contains all the principal journals devoted 
to English philology and many society transactions and 
other special publications together with complete sets of 
most of the standard English periodicals of the nineteenth 
century. A portion of the department library fund is re- 
served for buying special material for advanced students. 
At least three years of college work in English is re- 
quired for major work in this subject. Students who have 
not had one year of Old English (Anglo Saxon) must 
elect English 8. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

5. Shakespeare and the History of the Drama. L, 
II.; (3). Professor Dodge. 

6. English Criticism in the Nineteenth Century. L, 
II.; (2). Mr. Paul. 

7. English Fiction in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth 
Centuries. L, II. ; (2). Associate Professor Jayne. 

8. Old English (Anglo Saxon) Prose. L, II. ; (3). Pro- 
fessor Dodge. 

15. Methods of Teaching English Literature. L, II.; 
(1). Professor Dodge, Associate Professor Jayne, Assistant 
Professor Baldwin, Mr. Paul. 

19. The Literary Study of the Bible. 1., II.; (3). As- 
sistant Professor Baldwin. 

24. Browning.— Rapid critical reading of the poems. 1.; (3). 
Miss Kyle. 

25. Chaucer.— Critical reading of the principal poems. I.; 
(2). Professor Dodge. 

26. English Ballads. II.; (2). Professor Dodge. 



42 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

101. Eesearch Course in Sixteenth Century Litera- 
ture.— Professor Dodge and Assistant Professor Baldwin. 

102. Eesearch Course in Eighteenth Century Writers. 
— Professor Dodge and Associate Professor Jayne. 

103. Eesearch Course in Nineteenth Century Writers. 
—Associate Professor Jayne and Mr. Paul. 

GERMAN 

Courses in German primarily for graduates include 
courses in Old and Middle High German and a seminary 
for training independent literary investigation. These 
are supplemented by the more advanced of those courses 
which are primarily for undergraduates. 

The Library is well equipped with works in German lit- 
erature, especially of the classical and modern periods. 
It contains also complete files of the most important per- 
iodicals. 

Graduate students whose major is German must have 
had at least three years of University German or its equiv- 
alent. They must take courses 101, 102, 103, and in ad- 
dition six semester hours from among courses 8, 9, 25, 
and 27. For further work, any of the other courses de- 
scribed below, are open to graduate students. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

7. Heine's Prose; German Lyrics.— Eapid translation and 
sight reading of selections from Heine's Prose; study of lyric 
verse using as a guide Hatfields's German Lyrics and 
Ballads. I.; M., W., F.; (3). Assistant Professor Meyer. 

8. Schiller.— The life of Schiller, and study of Wallenstein 
and other selections. L; Tu., Th.; 3; (2). Assistant Professor 
Brooks. 

9. Goethe's Faust.— Part I, and portions of part II. L; M., 
W., F., 3; (3). Assistant Professor Meyer. 

10. Goethe.— The life of Goethe, and study of selections 



43 

from his lyrics, classical dramas, and prose works, II.; M., W., 
F.; 7; (3). Assistant Professor Meyek. 

11. History of Modern German Literature. — Lectures, 
recitations, and reports on assigned collateral reading. II. ; Tu., 
Th.; 7; (22). Assistant Professor Brooks. 

12. Recent and Contemporary Prose Fiction.— Eapid 
reading of works by Freytag, Dahn, Keller, Heyse, Sudermann, 
and others. I.; Tu., Th.; 7; (2). Assistant Professor Brooks. 

23. The Romantic School. — Rapid translation and sight 
reading; reports on assigned reading. I.; M., W., F.; 4; (3). Miss 
Blaisdell. 

24. Recent and Contemporary Drama.— Study of Dramas 
by Heyse, Hauptmann, Wilbrandt, Fulda, Sudermann, and oth- 
ers. II. ; M., W., F.; 4; (3). Assistant Professor Brooks. 

25. Teachers' Course.— Lectures, discussion of methods, 
examination of text-books. II. ; Tu.; 7; (1). Assistant Professor 
Meyer. 

26. German Literature Before the Reformation.— 
Lectures, recitations and reports on assigned reading; the course 
is intended to cover the period not included in course 11, and 
students who intend to take course 11, are advised to elect course 
26. L: Tu.; 8; (1). Assistant Professor Brooks. 

27. Lessing.— The life of Lessing, and study of Nathan der 
Weise and other selections. II.; M., W., F.; 3; (3). Assistant 
Professor Meyer. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

101. Introduction to Middle High German.— I.; M., W., 
F.; 8; 3. Assistant Professor Brooks. 

102. Old High German and Elements of Historical 
Grammar.— II.; Tu.; Th.; 8; (2). Assistant Professor Brooks. 

103. Seminary in Modern German Literature.— I. or 
II.; (2). Assistant Professor Meyer. 

GREEK 
The undergraduate courses offered in the Catalog con- 
stitute about six years' work. For registration with 
Greek as a graduate major, at least the first four years, or 
their equivalent, and an approved bachelor's degree are 
required. 



44 



Graduate minor courses are offered upon arrangement 
as follows: (a) the History of Classical Philology; (b) Gen- 
eral Introduction to the Science of Language; (c) the Pri- 
vate and Public Life of the Greek People. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

9. Greek Oratory.— L; M., W., E.; 4; (3). Professor Moss. 
Eequired: Greek 8. 

10. Greek Tragedy.— I.; Tu., Th.; 2; (2). Professor Moss. 
Eequired: Greek 8. 

11. Homer.— The Iliad.— II. ; M., W., F.; 4; (3). Professor 
Moss. 

Eequired: Greek 8. 

12. Thucydides.— II.; Tu., Th.; 4; (2). Professor Moss. 
Eequired: Greek 8. 

HISTORY 
With a view to offering opportunities for advanced work 
with the sources, the documentary collections of the 
University Library have been greatly strengthened. The 
following complete, or nearly complete, collection of 
source-material may be specialty noted: 

American History.— The records of debates in Congress in 
their various forms from 1789 to the present time; the Journals 
and Secret Journals of the Continental Congress before 1789; the 
American State Papers, and the congressional documents or re- 
ports; the U. S. Statutes at Large; The U. S. Supreme Court re- 
ports; the colonial statutes of Massachusetts, New York, Penn- 
sylvania, and Virginia; the legislative and judicial documents of 
Illinois; the collected writings, usually in the latest editions, of 
most of the "Fathers of the Eepublic" and of many of the late 
statesmen. 

English History.— The Statutes of the Bedim; House of Com- 
mons, Journals; Cabbeth, Parliamentary History and Hanson, 
Parliamentary Debates; the Annual Eegister; Pickering, Statutes at 
Large. The resources of the University Library are supplemented 
by those of the Champaign City Library which contains the 
books on western history, collected by the late Edward G. Mason, 
President of the Chicago Historical Society. 



45 

Though it is impossible to draw a hard and fast line be- 
tween advanced undergraduate and graduate work, can- 
didates for advanced degrees, with history as a major, 
must have had at least two years of undergraduate work 
in this subject. Work in the related social science will be 
accepted in partial substitution for that required in history. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

4. English Constitutional History.— I., II.; M., W., F.; 
2; (3). Assistant Professor Schoolcraft. 

8. The Empire and the Papacy in the Middle Ages. 
—The conflict of church and state. I., II.; M., W., F. Mr. 
Alvord. 

9. The Period of the Italian Renaissance.— I.; Tu., 
Th.; 7; (3). Mr. Alvord. 

10. The Development of the British Colonial Empire. 
—I.; M., W., F., 2; (3). Assistant Professor Schoolcraft. [Not 
given in 1904-05]. 

11. The Political History of Europe in the Nineteenth 
Century.— Professor Greene. 

13. The Political and Constitutional History of the 
English Colonies in America.— Professor Greene. 

14. The Constitutional History of the United States, 
1775-1860.— Professor Greene. 

15. The Political and Constitutional History of the 
United States since I860.— Professor Greene. 

101. The Seminary in American History.— Professor 
Greene. 

102. The Seminary in English History.— Assistant Pro- 
fessor Schoolcraft. 

Attention is also called to the courses in economic and 
financial history offered by the Department of Economics. 

LATIN 

Professor Barton 
The work offered pre-supposes the usual four years' 
preparatory course and three years of regular college 



46 

work. The intensive study of one of the masterpieces of 
golden or silver Latin will be the basis of the work, sup- 
plemented by the study of the Roman novel as found in 
Petronius and Apuleius. Ansonius and Claudianus will 
also be considered. Historical Latin Grammar and the 
private life of the Romans are included in these require- 
ments for the degree of Master of Arts. 

PHILOSOPHY 

One year's graduate work may, at present, be done in 
this department. In addition to the courses in philoso- 
phy, the student must select, under the guidance of the 
head of the department of philosophy, advanced courses 
in psychology, sufficient to complete a full course of study 
for the year. 

The minimum preparation required for admission is a 
year's work in both psychology and philosophy. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

5. Advanced Philosophy.— The seventeenth century phi- 
losophy. A critical study of Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibnitz. 
I.; Tu., Th.; 7; (2). Professor Daniels. [Not given in 1904-5]. 

Bequired: Two semesters in Philosophy of Psychology. 

10. Philosophic Thought in English Literature of 
the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries.— L; Tu., Th.; 
8; (1). Professor Daniels. 

11. Philosophy of Religion.— The philosophical interpre- 
tation of religious consciousness, with reference to the value of 
a rational view of religious ideas. Open to seniors and graduate 
students only. I., II.; Tu., 7; (1). Professor Daniels. 

12. The Philosophy of Herbert Spencer.— A critical 
study of his First Principles and Data of Ethics. The influence 
of the theory of evolution upon modern philosophy. Open to 
seniors and graduate students only. L; W., F.; 8; (2). Professor 
Daniels. 

13. Philosophy of Nature.— The study of scientific con- 
ceptions from the philosophic point of view. Man's place in 



47 

nature. The relation of mind and body. A critical study of 
selections from the writings of Clifford, Pearson, Ostwald, and 
other writers. Open to senior and graduate students only. II.; 
Tu., Th.; 8; (2). Professor Daniels. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

101. The Philosophy of Kant. 

EOMANIC LANGUAGES 
Graduate students are given ample opportunities to pur- 
sue advanced work in the Romanic Languages. The Uni- 
versity Library contains a valuable collection of books in 
these subjects, including back files of the leading periodi- 
cals treating of French Literature and Romanic Philol- 
ogy. Additions are constantly being made, and special 
needs of graduate students will be met so far as possible. 
The minimum requirement of work previously done is 
three years of French. To this it is desirable to add 
courses in Spanish and Italian. In the higher courses in- 
tended primarily for undergraduates, additional require- 
ments are made for graduates. The undergraduate courses 
in Italian and Spanish may be taken as graduate minors. 

Prospective teachers of the Romanic Languages should 
take up the study of the history and development of these 
tongues. Such study is required of all candidates for the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Romanic Languages. 
It is strongly recommended to all candidates for the de- 
gree of Master of Arts in this subject. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

3. Advanced French Prose Composition and Conver- 
sation.— This course may be taken alone, or, more profitably, 
with any other course. It is especially designed for students in 
the courses in business training, and for those intending to teach 
French. I. II.; Tu., Th.; 2; (2). Professor Oliver. 



48 



4. Nineteenth Century.— A general course on the ro- 
mantic and realistic novel and drama. Lyric poetry forms also 
an important share of the work. Modern tendencies are dis- 
cussed. Lectures, themes, and collateral reading. I., II.; M., 
W., F.; 2; (3). Mr. Hamilton. [Not given in 1904-5]. 

5. The Eomantic School.— Eise, development and decline 
of Romanticism in French literature with readings from all rep- 
resentative authors. During the latter part of the year, the 
characteristics of realism are discussed, and a few productions of 
the realistic school are read. I., II.; M., W., F.; 2: (3). Mr. 
Hamilton. 

7. Moliere.— Study of the life and times of Moliere with 
reading of the greatest comedies. I.; Tu., Th.; 2; (2). Mr. 
Hamilton. [Not open to students wh© have taken French 10]. 

8. Tragedy of the Classic School.— Rise, development 
and decline of Classic Tragedy as seen in the works of Corneille, 
Racine, and Yoltaire. II.; Tu., Th.; 2; (2). Mr. Hamilton. 
[Not open to students who have taken French 10]. 

9. Non-dramatic Literature of the Seventeenth Cen- 
tury. — Lectures on the culture and society of France in the sev- 
enteenth century as expressed in literature not dramatic. The 
great moralists and philosophers. Memoirs and letters. The 
Art Poetique and the Satires of Boileau. The fables of La Fon- 
taine. I., II.; M., W., F.; 4: (3). Professor Oliver. 

10. Seventeenth Century Drama. — Lectures on the rise 
and development of French Classic Drama with especial refer- 
ence to the society of France during this period. Interpreta- 
tion of the greater masterpieces of Corneille, Racine, Moliere 
and the secondary dramatists. Cohateral reading and themes. I., 
II.; M., W., F.: 4; (3). Professor Oliver. [Not given in 1904-5]. 

Bequired: "Twenty hours" credit exclusive of French 7 
and 8. 

11. Lyric Poetry of France.— The chief emphasis is laid 
upon Victor Hugo, but poets previous to him are also studied as 
well as his chief contemporaries and successors. The principles 
of French versification particularly as exemplified in Hugo and 
other Romantic writers are studied. I., II.; Tu., Th.; 3; (2). Dr. 
Jones. 



49 



12. Realistic Fiction.— Taking Balzac as its center this 
course treats in detail the development of French realistic fic- 
tion. L, II. ; Tu., Th. ; 3; (2). Dr. Jones. [Not given in 1904-5]. 

13. Non-Dramatic Literature of the Eighteenth Cen- 
tury.— Lectures on the society and culture of the eighteenth 
century. Break-up of the ideals of Classicism. Growth of the 
Eevolutionary spirit. First movements toward Romanticism. 
Montesquieu, Voltaire and the Encyclopedists. Rousseau, Dide- 
rot, Le Sage, and the writers of the Revolution. I., II., M., W., 
F. ; 4; (3). Professor Oliver. [Not given in 1904-5]. 

14. The Drama of the Eighteenth and Nineteenth 
Centuries. — The decadence of Classic Drama: —Voltaire— Cre- 
billon. Rise and growth of the drame bourgeois, the Romantic 
drama and the realistic drama. Modern tendencies. The chief 
works of Beaumarchais, Marivaux, Hugo, Musset, Scribe, Dumas 
pere, Augier, Dumas fils, Sardou, Coppee, Becque, Hervieu, Ros- 
tand, Brieux. Collateral reading with essays. I., II. ; M., W., 
F.; 4; (3). Professor Oliver. [Not given in 1904-5]. 



courses for graduates 

101. The Sixteenth Century.— The Reformation and the 
Renaissance. Rabelais, Calvin, Marot, Ronsard, and the Plei- 
ade, Montaigne. Readings from Darmsteter and Hatzf eld's "Le 
Seizieme Siecle en France". Study of the language and syntax 
of the period. I.; (3). Arrange time. Professor Oliver. 

102. French Historical Grammar.— Phonetics morphol- 
ogy, syntax. Illustrative readings from Old French texts. L, 
II.; (3). Arrange time. Professor Oliver. 

103. History of Old French Literature.— With represen- 
tative readings from Bartsch's Chrestomathie, La Chanson de 
Roland, Chrestien de Troyes and other works. The Mediseval 
drama. I., II.; (3). Arrange time. Professor Oliver. 

104. Comparative Historical Grammar of the Romanic 
languages with especial reference to Old French and Provencal. 
—Illustrative readings. L, II.; (3). Arrange time. Professor 
Oliver. 



50 

SUBJECTS OF THE COLLEGE OF SCIENCE 

BOTANY 

Professor Burrill and Assistant Professor Hottes 

Graduate botanical studies may be pursued in several 
lines for which the facilities of the laboratories are ample 
and the opportunities are in every way sufficient to meet 
the needs of advanced workers in plant histology, phys- 
iology, physiological C3 r tology, pathology, morphology, 
ecology, and bacteriology. 

The undergraduate courses are numbered from 1 to 12 
and carry credits aggregating 60 semester hours or five 
full years' work. Course 11 is a general introductory one 
of 5 "hours," (one semester) open without other restrict- 
ions than the University entrance requirements, to all 
matriculated students. Zoology 10 is a similar introduc- 
tory course of 5 "hours" and these together, or their equiv- 
alent, one year of biological work, constitute a minimum 
pre-requisite for minor graduate registration. Courses 1 
to 10 are therefore open to graduates as minor subjects. 
Courses 1 and 2, following 11, cover one year, and these 
or their equivalent are required for major graduate credit. 
Courses 3 to 10 inclusive may be approved, with any 
additions specified in individual cases, for major graduate 
work towards a master's degree. Registration for a doc- 
tor's degree ma}^ be accepted on the same basis, but in this 
case study must be so specialized as early to permit effect- 
ive research. Those having sufficient preparation will be 
enrolled at once for major work in one or more of the 
courses marked for graduates. These are research courses 
and the work is adapted to the special purposes or require- 
ments of each investigator. 

The collections in the Herbarium are in convenient order 
for reference and include materials for research in several 



51 

subjects. Of fungi there are over 30,000 mounted spec- 
imens together with a large amount of duplicate material. 

3. Cytology and Physiology. — Mostly laboratory work 
and assigned reading. The course extends through the year, but 
the work of each semester may be credited separately under the 
designations of 3a and 3b. The first semester is devoted mainly 
to cytology and histology, with special attention to technique; 
during the second semester experimental physiology receives 
chief attention. I., II.; 3, 4: (5). Assistant Professor Hottes. 

Bequired: Botany 1. 

4. Taxonomy of Special Groups. — Mostly laboratory and 
herbarium work, and assigned reading. Field excursions are re- 
quired. The course extends through the year, but the work of 
each semester may be credited separately under the designations 
of 4a and 4b. The first semester is devoted mainly to sperma- 
phytes, the second to sporophytes. I., II.; 1, 2; (5). Professor 
Bcjrrill. 

Bequired: Botany 2. 

5. Bacteriology. — An introduction to the knowledge of 
the subject and instruction in methods. II.; 3, 4; (5). Pro- 
fessor Btjrrill and Miss Latzer. 

Bequired: Chemistry 1, and at least one semesters work in 
botany or zoology, in the University. 

7. Plant Pathology. — Diseases and injuries of plants. 
Mostly laboratory, herbarium, and field work, and assigned read- 
ing. I.; M., W., F; 1, 2; (3). Professor Btjrrill. 

Bequired: Botany 1, 2. 

9. Investigations and Thesis. — Research work upon se- 
lected subjects. Special arrangements for this work should be 
made during the preceding year. I., II.; arrange time; (5). Pro- 
fessor Burrill and Assistant Professor Hottes. 

Bequired: Botany 1, 2, and at least one year from 3, 4, 5, 7. 

10. Seminary. — Reports and discussions upon assigned top- 
ics and results of research work. For advanced and graduate 
students. I. II.; F.; arrange time. (1). Professor Btjrrill. 

courses for graduates 

101. Biological Botany. — The preparation and study of 
material by histological and embryological methods, and exper- 



52 



iment work with living vegetation in the laboratory and field in 
working out special problems in the development, physiology, 
and pathology of plants. Assistant Professor Hottes. 

102. Systematic Botany. — Critical and comparative stud- 
ies of species included in chosen groups of spermaphytes or spor- 
ophytes, or from selected geographic areas, in connection with 
considerations of genealogic development, geographic distribu- 
tion, and interrelated association. Professor Burrill. 

103. Bacteriology. — Investigations upon morphologic and 
physiologic variation due to treatment; systematic studies upon 
the Humber, validity, and relationship of species, researches upon 
special saprophytic or parasitic kinds of bacteria and upon meth- 
ods of favoring or combating their activities. Professor Burrill. 

104. Evolution of Plants. — Observations and experi- 
ments upon plants and studies in related literature, in gaining 
information upon such topics as the following: The influence 
of environment, effects of self and cross fertilization, tendencies 
of variation, philosophy of selection, nature and laws of heredity. 
Professor Burrill and Assistant Professor Hottes. 

CHEMISTRY 
Special opportunities and facilities are afforded prop- 
erly prepared students, to undertake graduate work in all 
lines of pure and applied chemistry. The commodious, 
new chemical building, with its large laboratories and 
separate research rooms is well equipped for graduate 
work in inorganic, organic, physical, agricultural, and ap- 
plied chemistry. In combination with certain engineer- 
ing courses special facilities are available to students 
wishing to do graduate work in electro-chemistry and in 
chemical engineering. The requirement for major gradu- 
ate work in the Departments of Chemistry is the bacca- 
laureate degree of this University or its full equivalent. 

courses for graduates 

101. Organic Chemistry. — Special investigations in the al- 
iphatic or in the aromatic series. Associate Professor Grindley 
and Dr. Dehn. 



53 



102. Inorganic Chemistry. — Research work in general inor- 
ganic chemistry, including the critical and constructive study 
of methods of analysis, both quantitative and qualitative. Pro- 
fessor Parr, Associate Professor Grindley, and Dr. Lincoln. 

103. Physical Chemistry.— Investigation of special prob- 
lems, including thermo-chemical research. Dr. Lincoln. 

104. Chemistry of Foods. — Investigations of the composi- 
tion, fuel value, digestibility, and dietary value of foods, and 
the chemical changes involved in cooking. Associate Professor 
Grindley. 

105. Agricultural Chemistry. — Special investigations in 
the field of agricultural chemistry, including the chemistry of 
plants, foods, soils, and rain, drain, and ground waters. Associ- 
ate Professor Grindley and 

106. Research in Metallurgical Chemistry.— (a) Action 
of solvents in extraction of gold and silver from their ores, (b) 
Methods of analysis of ores and products. Professor Parr. 

107. Investigation or Water Supplies.— In connection 
with State Water Survey. Mr. Stark. 

108. Investigation of Fuels— 

(a) Heating power, calorimetric methods. 

(b) Adaptation of bituminous coal to gas manufacture, 
purification of products. 

(c) Coke and by-products. 

Professor Parr. 

109. Special Problems in Industrial Chemistry.— 

(a) Corrosion and scaling of steam boilers. 

(b) Purification of feed water. 

(c) Cements and mortars. 

(d) Paints and pigments. 

Professor Parr. 

GEOLOGY 
The undergraduate courses offered in this department 
cover a wide field. Each of the semester courses, miner- 
alogy (Geol. 5), general geology as taken by chemists, or 
as taken by general science students (Geol. 1), agricultural 
geology (Geol. 12), engineering geology (Geol. 13), or 
physical geography (Geol. 8), looks toward, and is pre- 



54 

paratory for a different line of advanced work. The 
equipment of the department enables us to offer excellent 
facilities for advanced study along each of these lines. 

To the agriculturist there is offered studies in the miner- 
alogical composition of soils carried on by the use of the 
microscope and other optical agencies; in mineral and rock 
decomposition; and in meteorology: to the engineer and 
chemist, studies in the characteristics, origin and methods 
of deposition of all useful minerals, together with the uses 
which are made of them; in the testing of mineral sub- 
stances used in the manufacture of structural materials, by 
physical methods; in mineral synthesis; and in petrography; 
to the biologist, studies in paleontology, using our unus- 
ually large collection of paleozoic forms; in organic evolu- 
tion from the standpoint of the geologist; and in the 
distribution of organisms as affected by geographic in- 
fluences: to the teacher, studies in the geology and physical 
geography of selected regions with special reference to 
their influence on the welfare of mankind; and of methods 
for observational and laboratory work in these subjects 
which are best adapted to the needs of students in second- 
ary schools: to the student of general science such selection 
from the above as will best promote the object he has in 
view. 

At least one semester of apporpriate introductory work, 
as offered in University courses, or the equivalent, is re- 
quired for graduate registration. The courses open to 
undergraduates may be taken for minor graduate credit, 
or with approved additions, for major work. 

2. Economic Geology. — A study of the uses man may make 
of geologic materials; of the conditions under which they occur, 
and those under which they were formed; and of the qualities 
which make them valuable. Readings, conferences, and labora- 
tory work. 



55 



Each student may select one or more of the subjects indica- 
ted below and devote so much time to it as may seem desirable 
or profitable. The proportion of time devoted to reading, confer- 
ence and laboratory will of course vary with the nature of the 
subject chosen. The laboratory affords facilities for making the 
work thoroughly practical. 

Ores and ore deposits, useful minerals other than ores, min- 
eral synthesis, petrographic studies, properties of clays which fit 
them for various uses, properties of lime and cement-making 
materials; properties of building stones; rock-flours and their 
uses, origin, and uses of road metals, studies of ornamental 
stones, coals and coal basins, hydrographic studies, etc., either, 
or both semesters, (2, 3, or 5). Professor Wolfe, Mr. Fox, and 
Mr. Matson. 

4. Investigations. — Students desiring to take advanced work 
in any department of dynamic or historical geology, in mineral- 
ogy or in physical geography may, with approval, select a 
subject for investigation and receive such guidance and help as 
may be necessary. Readings, conferences, laboratory and field 
work are apportioned according to the nature of the subject. The 
work is individual, and the student is expected to show results. 
Either semester: (3 or 5). Professor Eolfe, Mr. Fox, and Mr. 
Matson. 

6. Advanced Crystallography.— During the first part of 
the semester a detailed study of the forms of crystals, their 
combinations and abnormalties is made. Later the student 
learns to measure the facial angles of crystals with the contact 
and reflecting goniometers and by mathematical calculations to 
determine the species. I. Tu., Th.; 3-4; (2). Professor Eolfe, 
and Mr. Fox. 

7. Optical Mineralogy.— The student is first made ac- 
quainted with the peculiarities of the petrographic microscope, 
and of the behavior of minerals in thin section in parallel and 
convergent light. He then places thin sections of minerals and 
rocks under the microscope and learns to determine their species 
and the changes which are taking place in them by their effect 
on transmitted light. I.; M., W., F. 3-4; (3). Professor Eolfe, 
and Mr. Fox. 

9. Advanced Paleontology. — This course includes (a) dis- 
cussion of the biological relations of fossils form along the lines 



56 

indicated in Williams' Geological Biology: (b) discussion of the 
principles of classification as applied to fossils, together with 
the characteristics which distinguish the larger groups, using 
"Nlcholsom, Bernard, and Zitti as guides; (c) study of the distri- 
bution and variations of the genera and species of one or more of 
the important groups as illustrated by the collections of the 
University. Either semester; 3-4; (5). Professor Rolfe, Mr. 
Fox, and Mr. Matson. 

10. Teacher's Courses in Physical Geography.— This 
course is designed primarily for those who expect to teach. The 
work includes discussions of the most approved methods of pre- 
senting each topic in class room, field, and laboratory, and the 
use which can be made of local geography, topography and geol- 
ogy together with the fauna and flora as illustrative material. 
It also includes the selection of topographic sheets issued by the 
United States Geological Survey which show well developed 
topographic types, and their proper use in the class room; the 
manufacture and use of models and all other means by which 
the principles of the science may be experimentally studied. It 
further includes observations on character of cloud, direction 
and velocity of wind, temperature and humidity of the air, and 
their relation to weather changes; the study of weather maps, 
and the constitution and use of simple apparatus for meteoro- 
logical observations. A study is made of the geographic ele- 
ments which have combined to produce the peculiarities of sur- 
face and climate of selected regions and the effect which these 
combinations have had on the historical, commercial and indus- 
trial progress of their inhabitants. I.; arrange time. (5). Pro- 
fessor Rolfe, and Mr. Matson. 

courses for graduates 

102. Economic Geology.— The laboratories afford facili- 
ties for the study of problems in economic geology by the most 
approved methods. These problems may be approached from 
the geological side only in the laboratories of the department, or 
may be carried on under the joint direction of the departments 
of geology and applied chemistry. Again they may be purely 
laboratory problems, or the student may make an economic sur- 
vey of some assigned area. 

104. Dynamic Geology.— The dynamic problems in Illinois 
geology have scarcely been touched except on the glacial side. 



57 



There are many problems in stream work, pre-glacial drainage, 
tracing moraines of Illinois glaciation, water supply, penepla- 
nation, deserted lake beds, the Ozark ridge, etc., that await 
solution. The University offers excellent facilities for work 
along these lines. 

108. Physical Geography.— Studies in the geography of 
Illinois dealing with the topography, meteorology, climatology, 
and natural products of assigned areas. 

HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE 

The University affords unusual facilities for advanced 
work in this department. The equipment of the depart- 
ment has been carefully selected and much illustrative 
material has been secured. In addition to the laboratories 
of the department, the resources of the library, the inves- 
tigations of the well equipped science laboratories, the 
researches of the department of economics, are available 
for the use of the student. 

At least one year of acceptable household science work 
is required for graduate registration. Courses open to 
undergraduates will have additions for graduate credit. 

COURCES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

4. Chemistry of Food and Nutrition.— Food and nutri- 
tion from the standpoint of sanitary and physiological chemistry. 
Investigations in the study of yeasts; household applications of 
bacteriology; dietaries adapted to different ages, occupations 
and conditions. Bichard and Woodman's Air, Water, and Food; 
Halliburton's Essentials of Chemical Physiology; Government Bulletins. 
I.; M., W.; 3., 4.; Tu., Th., F.; 3; (5). Professor Bevier. 

Bequired: Bot. 5. Chem. 1, 3b, 4, 5c, 20; 5 hours in Botany or 
Zoology. 

5. Dietetics and Household Management.— The topics 
considered are: (a) the principles of diet; the relation of food to 
health; the influence of age, sex and occupation; the dietic treat- 
ment of certain diseases; principles of home nursing, (b) The 
organization and care or the household; the processes involved 
in the cleaning of metals, woods, and fabrics; the use of disinfect- 
ants. II. ; M., W., F.; 5; (3). Miss Beatty. 

Bequired: Household Science 1, 6. 



58 



6. Economic Uses of Food.— This course is a continuation 
of course 1. Emphasis is put upon the economic side of the food 
question. The uses and applications of preservatives are consid- 
ered. L; M., W., F.; 1, 2; (3). Miss Beatty. 

Bequired: Household Science 1. 

8. Personal and Public Hygiene.— This course is intended 
to be a popular presentation of the results of late investigations 
in regard to food and sanitation. II.; Tu.; 7; (1). Professor 
Bevier. 

9. Seminary.— Reports and discussions upon assigned topics. 
For advanced students. L, II.; W.; arrange time; (1) Professor 
Bevier. 

101. Home Economics.— A study of the origin and develop- 
ment of Home Economics in its various phases. Particular 
attention is given to its industrial, educational and sociological 
aspects. Professor Bevier. 

102. Special Investigations.— Problems in the application 
of the principles of bacteriology, chemistry and physiology to 
the ordinary processes used in the preparation of food. Professor 
Bevier and Mrs. Sober. 

MATHEMATICS 

The University offers an opportunity for pursuing grad- 
uate work in mathematics for two or three years. The 
minimum requirement for entering upon this work in- 
cludes three years of undergraduate study in the same line. 
It is recommended that students anticipating graduate 
work at this University shall take, in addition to the above 
requirements in mathematics, a year of experimental phys- 
ics and when possible a half year in mechanics. Students 
making their major in mathematics may with profit elect 
at least one of their minors from the allied subjects in en- 
gineering, physics, or astronomy. 

The University Library contains complete sets of the 
leading French, German, English, and American mathe- 
matical journals. It also contains the most important 
collected works and treatises, particularly in the line of 
theory of functions and in geometry. The department is 



59 

supplied with a collection of models for use in geometry 
and in the theory of functions. Research work in these 
two lines is amply provided for. In connection with the 
preparation of a thesis, all graduate students in mathemat- 
ics are required to be members of the mathematical 
seminar (Math. 15) where the results of their investigations 
are presented and discussed. 

Aside from the following courses, which are regularly 
offered to advanced undergraduates, work will be given in 
continuous groups, and definite integrals, if the demand 
for these subjects seems to warrant it. 

12. Theory of Invariants. — The general development of 
the theory of invariants, both from the geometric and from the 
algebraic side. Applications of invariants to systems of conies 
and higher plain curves. I.; M., W., F.; 7; (3). Dr. Eietz. 

Bequired: Mathematics 8b (or 9), 11. 

13a. Functions of Real Variables.— The two courses in 
functions (13a , 13b) are a continuation of the work done in cal- 
culus (8a, 8b, or 7, 9). Under functions of real variables, consid- 
erable attention is given to the fundamental ideas of the analysis, 
including rational and irrational numbers, mengelehre, single 
and double limits and their application to questions of continuity 
of functions of one and two variables, uniform convergence of 
series, etc. The existence of derivities, condensation of singu- 
larities, definite integrals, differentiation and integration of 
series are also discussed. L, II. ; M., W., F.; 8; (3). Associate 
Professor Townsend. 

Bequired: Mathematics 8a, 8b, (or 7, 9,) 10. 

13b. Functions of a Complex Variable. — A general in- 
troduction to the theory of functions of a complex variable. 
The methods of Weierstrass and Riemann are followed. I., II. ; 
M., W., F.; 8; (3). Associate Professor Townsend. 

Bequired: Mathematics 8a, 8b (or 7,9,) 10. 

14. Method of Least Squares.— The fundamental princi- 
ples of the subject. The following subjects are studied: Law 
of probability and error, adjustment of observations, precision 
of observations, independent and conditional observations, etc. 
I.; Tu., Th.; 6; (2). Dr. Stebbins. 

Bequired: Mathematics 8a, or 9. 



60 



15. Seminary and Thesis.— I., II.; Tu., Th.; 8; (3). Asso- 
ciate Professor Townsend. 

18. Higher Plane Curves.— This course includes the gen- 
eral theory of algebraic curves, together with the application of 
the theory of invariants to higher plane curves. Special study 
is made of curves of the third and fourth order. II.; M., W., F.; 
7; (3). Dr. Kietz. 

Bequired: Mathematics 12. 

20. Calculus of Variations.— This course has for its aim 
merely to acquaint the student with those elements of the 
science which are most needed in the study of the higher subjects 
of mathematical astronomy and physics. II.; M., W., F.; 4; (3). 
Professor Shattuck. 

Bequired: Mathematics 11, 16. 

21. Spherical Harmonics.— This course is introduced by a 
short course of lectures and study of certain trigonometric series. 
Fourier's Theorem for developing any function of a variable in a 
series proceeding in sines and cosines of multiples of the var- 
iable is derived and the limitations of its validity investigated. 
This is followed by the study of Lagrange's, Laplace's, and 
Lame's functions and their applications t© astronomical and 
physical problem. I.; M., W., F.; 6; (3). Assistant Professor 
Hall or Mr. Brenke. 

Bequired: Mathematics 11, 14, 16. 

22. Potential Function.— The potential function is defined 
and its properties derived and discussed. The potential of var- 
ious bodies, such as wire, a spherical shell, a sphere, ellipsoid of 
revolution , etc. , is computed. Poisson 's and Laplace \s Equations 
are derived and discussed. Green's propositions with kindred 
and similar subjects are considered. II.; M., W., F.; 6; (3). Assist- 
ant Professor Hall or Mr. Brenke. 

Bequired: Mathematics 21. 

23. Modern Geometry. — This course includes, in general, a 
consideration of homogeneous coordinates, duality, descriptive 
and metrical properties of curves, anharmonic ratios, homog-, 
raphy, involution, projection, theory of correspondence, etc. L; 
M^, W.,F.; 7; (3). Mr. Coar. 

Bequired: Mathematics 8a or 7, 11. 

24. Algebraic Surfaces.— In this course are considered the 



61 

application of homogeneous coordinates and the theory of invar- 
iants to geometry of three dimensions, and also the general theory 
of surfaces, together with the special properties of surfaces of 
the third and fourth order. II. ; M., W., F.; 7; (3). Mr. Coar. 

Beqaircd: Mathematics 17, 18. 

25. Partial Differential Equations.— It deals with the 
integration and determination of the integration constants of 
such partial differential equations as arise in the study of such 
subjects as the flow of heat, the vibration of strings, plates, etc., 
and electricity. II.; Tu., Th.; 7; (2). Associate Professor Town- 
send. 

Bequired: Mathematics 8a or 9, 16. 

PHYSICS 
The advanced work in physics is both experimental and 
theoretical. The Physics Laboratory is equipped with 
the necessities and conveniences for experimental work. 
In addition to the large lecture and laboratory rooms ar- 
ranged for the elementary undergraduate courses, a large 
space on the first floor is conveniently divided into rooms 
for advanced experimental work. These include six rooms 
with heavy masonry piers, a constant temperature room, 
a chemical preparation room, three rooms for spectrum, 
photometric and photographic work, and a well-equipped 
machine shop. The cabinets of the department contain 
fine standard apparatus from the best makers for work in 
the various branches of physics. The equipment for work 
in heat and in electricity and magnetism is especially strong, 
much new apparatus having been added recently. The 
services of a mechanician give means of constructing spec- 
ial apparatus needed for investigational work of graduate 
students and instructors. The literature of physics is 
also available, as the University Library contains not only 
the standard treatises and manuals of reference, but also 
sets of practically all of the English, French, and Ger- 
man journals in physics and the cognate subjects of chem- 
try and mathematics. 



62 



One year of University physics, including laboratory 
courses, and corresponding training in mathematics or 
chemistry, will ordinarily be accepted for admittance to 
graduate work in physics. Courses open to undergradu- 
ates will have additions for graduate credit. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

5. Advanced Experimental Physics.— This includes the 
following separate courses: (5a) Mechanics; (5b) Light; (5c) Elec- 
tricity and Magnetism; (5d) Heat. Each course I. or II. semes- 
ter; time to be arranged: credit to be 2, 3, or 5 hours. Professor 
Carmen and Assistant Professor Knipp. 

5. Theoretical Physics.— This includes five courses on the 
elementary mathematical theory of physics. A knowledge of 
the elementary methods of the calculus is desired. (6a) Me- 
chanics; (6b) Light (Preston's light); (6c) Electricity and Magnet- 
ism (Thomson's Elementary Mathematical Theory); (6d) Heat 
(Preston's Heat): (6e) fluids. Each course 3 or 5 hours' credit. 
Semester and hours to be arranged. Professor Carmen, Assistant 
Professor Knipp, and Dr. Watson. 

7. Investigation of Special Problems.— I. and II.; time 
to be arranged; 3 or 5 hours' credit. Professor Carmen, Assis- 
tant Professor Knipp, and Dr. Watson. 

8. Mathematical Physics. — Semester and hours to be arranged; 
3 or 5 hours' credit. Professor Carmen. 

courses for graduates 

101. Advanced Physical Measurements and Investiga- 
tion.— This is work in advance of courses 5 and includes the 
experimental work in preparation of a thesis. Both semesters, 
with hours and credit to be arranged. Professor Carmen, Assis- 
tant Professor Knipp, and Dr. Watson. 

102. Mathematical Physics. — Work and hours to be arranged. 
Professor Carmen. 

103. Mathematical Theory of Electricity and Magnet- 
ism for Engineers. Professor Carmen and Assistant Professor 
Knipp. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

The equipment of the laboratory includes a considera- 
ble number of instruments of precision giving facilities of 



63 

research along certain lines as good as can be found in 
the country. Graduates interested in certain problems, 
especially such as are connected with the blood and its 
circulation and respiration, may profitably spend one 
or more years in advanced investigations, in or beyond 
courses described below. 

Registration for major credit requires at least one year 
of undergraduate work in the subject, viz., course 1, or 
an equivalent; but for those who have the requisite train- 
ing in chemistry, physics, and zoology any of the courses 
1, 2, 3, or 5 may be accepted for minor credit. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

2. Advanced Course.— Continuation of Physiology 1 through 
a second year. This course is designed for students who wish to 
get as thorough a training as possible for the study of medicine, 
and who can afford to take the full science course at the Uni- 
versity leading to the B. S. degree. Lectures, assigned reading, 
and experiments in the laboratory conducted by the students 
under the supervision of the instructor. I., II.; daily 3, 4; (5). 
Professor Kemp. 

3. Investigation and Thesis.— Every facility and encour- 
agement, so far as the resources of the laboratory permit, are 
offered to those prepared to avail themselves of these for re- 
searches leading to theses for the bachelor's, master's or doctor's 
degree, or for carrying on original work for publications. 

4. Minor Course. — Especial emphasis is laid upon those facts 
that serve as a basin for practical hygiene, and for helping stu- 
dents to teach physiology in high schools. Lecture demonstra- 
tions, recitations, and laboratory work. Students who have had 
chemistry and zoology in high schools may be admitted to the 
course at the option of the instructor. II.; daily; 7, 8; (5). Pro- 
fessor Kemp. 

Required: Chemistry 1, zoology 10. 

5. Special Physiology.— There are here included the fol- 
lowing lines of laboratory work, any one or more of which may 
be pursued independently of the others: (a) The physiology of 
foods, and digestion; (b) the blood, circulation, and respiration; 



64 



(c) the excretions, especially urine analysis; (d) general physiol- 
ogy of nerve and muscle; (e) advanced vertebrate, especially 
human, histology. This course may be taken after physiology 4, 
and is recommended for those who wish to work a year in physi- 
ology without having the requirements to enter the class in 
physiology 1. It may also be taken for less than five credits. 
Work to be arranged after consultation with Professor Kemp. 

ZOOLOGY 

Zoology may be taken as a graduate minor by a student 
who has taken the introductory courses in zoology and 
botany (zoology 10 and botany 11), which together make 
one year's work. It may be taken as a graduate major 
by one who has taken zoology 10 or its equivalent fol- 
lowed by course 1 (invertebrate zoology) or course 2 (ver- 
tebrate zoology and comparative anatomy), one year's col- 
lege work in all. 

The courses hereinafter described may be taken as 
minors or majors for either the master's or the doctor's 
degree. For the master's degree any one of courses 1 to 
9, and 12 to 17 of this list may be counted as a minor, and 
any series of these courses amounting to ten semester hours 
may be taken as a major. Whether or not a research 
course followed by a thesis will be required for the mas- 
ter's degree will depend, in each case, on the undergrad- 
uate work of the candidate, and the approval of the Uni- 
versity Committee on the Graduate School. The course 
leading to the doctor's degree with zoology as a major 
should comprise, as a rule, all the above courses, together 
with a research course of at least one year, the results of 
which are to be embodied in the dissertation. A selection 
of minor courses should be made with reference to the 
candidate's previous studies, and will be subject to the 
approval of the committee on the Graduate School. 

Graduate students in this department have access to the 
important and extensive special libraries and collections 



65 



of the State Laboratory of Natural History, housed in the 
Natural History Building. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

1. Invertebrate Zoology.— This course is largely given to 
the study of common invertebrate animals of Illinois, with spec- 
ial attention to their distribution, habits, life histories, and 
adaptive structures. A few type forms are studied additional to 
those of the elementary course. Field work and its methods are 
included in the course, the work of which is adapted through- 
out to the needs of prospective teachers. I.; lecture, M\, W., F.; 
4; laboratory, 7 periods; 3 and 4; (5). Professor Forbes and Dr. 
Peters. 

Required: Art and Design 1; an entrance credit in chemistry 
or chemistry 1; zoology 10. 

2. Vertebrate Zoology and Comparative Anatomy.— In 
the laboratory work of this course principal attention will be given 
to the anatomy of Necturus and to anatomical and systematic 
studies of fishes, birds, and mammals, especial reference being 
had to the anatomy of man. The more difficult parts of labora- 
tory technology will be given in this course, which will also con- 
tain lectures on the general theory of organic development as 
illustrated by the doctrine of the descent of man. I.; lecture, 
M., W., F.; 4; laboratory, 7 periods; arrange time; (5). Assistant 
Professor Smith and Dr. Peters. 

Required: The same as for zoology 1. 

3. Vertebrate Embryology.— This course begins with a 
study of the sex cells and a discussion of theories of heredity, 
followed by a consideration of the early stages in the develop- 
ment of the egg. The formation of the vertebrate body is then 
studied in the amphibian, the chick, and the pig. Instruction 
is given in the preparation of embryological material and in 
graphic reconstruction from serial sections. II.; 3, 4. (5). Dr. 
Peters. 

Required: Zoology 2. 

15. Variation and Heredity.— A course of lectures and ref- 
erence reading designed to give a general survey of the results 
obtained by the application of modern statistical methods in the 
study of variation and heredity. A knowledge of the methods is 
acquired from lectures and from exercises in handling data gath- 
ered from various sources. Mendel's principles and the theory 



66 



of mutations are discussed. For accompanying laboratory work 
see 15a. II.; arrange time; (2). Assistant Professor Smith. 

Bequired: Zoology 10 or 11. 

15a. Statistical Data.— Laboratory work involving the col- 
lection of data suitable for a study of the variations and correla- 
tions of structures in some suitable organism may be elected in 
connection with course 5. The extensive collections of insects, 
fishes, and plankton material in the possession of the state 
Laboratory of Natural History are available for the purposes of 
this course. II.; arrange time; (1 to 3). 

Bequired: Zoology 10 or 11. 

17. Field Zoology. — A course in which the main object will 
be to gain as comprehensive a knowledge as practicable of the 
animal life of a restricted locality. Collection, preservation, and 
identification of the various kinds of animals, together with 
observations on the habits, life histories, and relations to envir- 
onment of selected forms will constitute the major part of the 
work. The phases of the subject receiving most attention will 
vary with the make-up of the class and with the kind of locality 
selected, but in any event the work will be so planned as to make 
it a desirable course for prospective teachers of zoology. The 
organization and management of the work will be such that 
graduate students intending to work subsequently on special 
groups, as plankton forms, annelids, or fishes, can give especial 
attention to such groups, if found desirable. II.; arrange time; 
(3). Assistant Professor Smith. 

Bequired: Zoology 10 or 11, and 1 or 2. 

8. Thesis Investigation.— Candidates for graduation who 
select a zoological subject as a thesis are required to spend three 
hours a day during their senior year in making a detailed inves- 
tigation of the selected topics. While this work is done under 
the general supervision of an instructor, it is in its methods and 
responsibilities essentially original work. I., II.; arrange time; 
(5). Professor Forbes and Assistant Professor Smith. 

Bequired: Two years in zoological courses, including one se- 
mester of zoology 4. 

12. Statistical Zoology.— This course is offered for students 
taking mathematics 26. It includes lectures and reference read- 
ing on the application of statistical methods to biological prob- 
lems. The history of the development of this mode of biological 
investigation, the nature of the problems to which it is applicable 



67 



and some of the results already obtained in the study of varia- 
tions, heredity, distribution and phylogeny are among the topics 
considered. Students taking this course, together with math- 
ematics 26b, ordinarily use for the problems of the latter course, 
zoological data that have been obtained either by their own 
observations or from other sources. If desired the combined 
credits of this course and mathematics 26 may be counted as 5 
credits either in zoology or in mathematics. II. ; F.; 7; (1 or 5). 
Assistant Professor Smith. 

Bequired: Mathematics 2, 4, 6, 8a, and at least ten hours of 
University work in zoology, or in zoology and entomology. 

14. German Readings.— A study of zoological literature in 
German intended to give technical information and practice of 
accurate and rapid reading. This course, together with botany 
13, will be accepted instead of German 6 of the prescribed list of 
all except students in chemistry and chemical engineering. I., 
II.; arrange time; (2). Assistant Professor Hottes. 

Bequired: German 4. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

101. Plankton Zoology.— Instruction and practice will be 
given in modern methods of studying minute forms of aquatic 
life with the aid of a plankton apparatus and laboratory equip- 
ment. This work includes both a qualitative and a quantitative 
investigation of the minute zoological contents of a selected 
body of water, carried on systematically through a considerable 
period, and the generalization of the results of such study by the 
methods peculiar to the planktologist. 

102. Fresh- water Ichthyology.— The large collections of 
fishes belonging to the University and the State Laboratory of 
Natural History, together with the ichthyological library of the 
latter, are open to students who wish to become acquainted with 
the ichthyological of a fresh-water situation. Both qualitative 
and quantitative studies of the fishes of a selected body of water 
are made, and papers written presenting the results of personal 
studies in this field. 

103. Fresh-water and Terrestrial Annelids.— This is 
an application of the methods of the zoological laboratory to the 
study of the annelid worms of the land and the inland waters of 
North America. The description of genera and species, practice 
in drawing for publication, and experimental work on the physiol- 
ogy and ecology of selected forms will be included in this course 



68 



SUJBECTS OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
AGEONOMY 

The instruction offered in the department of agronomy 
covers the subjects of soil fertility, soil physics, soil bac- 
teriology, crop production, plant breeding, and farm me- 
chanics. The department is also conducting extensive in- 
vestigations relating to soils and crops. A considerable 
number of advanced students are employed during the 
summer season in connection with soil fertility investiga- 
tions, the detail survey of Illinois soils, experimentation 
with corn and other field crops, etc., their time being 
devoted to study during the winter season. 

The facilities for graduate work include an analytical 
laboratory for analyzing soils, crops, and plant food ma- 
terials, extensive greenhouses erected specifically for 
studying soil fertility by pot cultures, well equipped and 
commodious laboratories for the study of soil physics, 
soil bacteriology, plant breeding and seed testing. Aside 
from the large number of experiment fields which are 
located in many different parts of the state, the de- 
partment is conducting extensive field experiments cov- 
ering about one hundred acres of land on the University 
farm at Urbana, some of which have been in progress for 
nearly thirty years. Besides these regular Experiment 
Station fields, which are made use of in giving instruc- 
tion, there are certain fields which are reserved for stu- 
dent experiments. 

Good instruments are provided for surveying lands in 
working out systems of tile drainage, and two large lab- 
oratories (40 by 116 feet each) are well equipped with the 
various kinds of farm implements including field machin- 
ery, windmills, power spraying machines, gas engines, 
and other power machines and hand tools used on the 



69 

farm. Many students taking advanced work in farm 
mechanics are employed during the summer season as 
machinery experts by different harvesting machine com- 
panies. For registration in major graduate work at least 
two years' undergraduate study in agronomy and the 
requisite special preparation is required. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

7. Special Crops.— A special study of farm crops taken up 
under an agricultural outline— grain crops, root crops, forage 
crops, sugar and fiber crops — their history and distribution over 
the earth, methods of culture, cost of production, consumption 
of products and residues, or by-products. Class work supple- 
mented by practical field work and a study of the results of 
previous experiments, such as detasseling corn, injury to roots 
of corn by cultivation; selection of seeds of farm crops; special 
reference to Illinois conditions. II.; daily: 3, 4.; (5). Mr. Hume. 

Bequired: Agronomy 2, 5, 6. 

8. Field Experiments.— Special work by the students, con- 
ducted in the field. This work consists in testing varieties 
of corn, oats, wheat, potatoes, and other farm crops; methods of 
planting corn, seeding grains, grasses, and other forage crops; 
culture of corn, potatoes, and sugar beats; practice in treating 
oats and wheat for smut, and potatoes for scab, and studying 
the effects upon the crops; combating chinch bugs and other in- 
jurious insects. Other practical experiments may be arranged 
with the instructor. Special opportunities will be given to ad- 
vanced students of high class standing to take up experiments, 
under assignment and direction of the instructor in crop produc- 
tion, on certain large farms in the state, arrangements having 
been made with farm owners or managers for such experiments. 
II.; second half, and summer vacation; daily; arrange time (2-J— 5). 
Mr. Hume. 

Bequired: Agronomy 7, 12. 

10. Special Problems in Soil Physics. — This work is in- 
tended for students wishing to specialize in the study of the 
physical properties of soils, and includes the determination by 
electrical methods of the temperature, moisture, and soluble 
salt content, of various soils under actual field conditions; effect 
of different depths of plowing, cultivation, and rolling, on soil 



70 

conditions; effects of different methods of preparing seed beds; 
the physical questions involved in the formation and redemption 
of the so-called "alkali," "barren" or "dead dog" soils, and of 
other peculiar soils of Illinois. . II. ; or summer vacation; daily; 
arrange time; (2 to 5). Mr. Mosier. 

Bcquired: Agronomy 9, and one semester's work in geology. 

13. Investigation of the Fertility of Special Soils.— 
This course is primarily designed to enable the student to 
study the fertility of those special soils in which he may be par- 
ticularly interested, and to become familiar with the correct 
principles and methods of such investigations. It will include 
the determination of the nature and quality of the elements of 
fertility in the soils investigated, the effect upon various crops 
of different fertilizers added to the soils as determined by pot 
cultures, and, where possible, by plot experiments. This work 
will be supplemented by a systematic study of the work of exper- 
iment stations and experimenters along these lines of investiga- 
tion. I., II.; arrange time; (2 to 5). Professor Hopkins. 

Bequired: Agronomy 12. 

16. German Agricultural Readings.— A study of the 
latest agricultural experiments and investigations published in 
the German language, special attention being given to soils and 
crops. The current numbers of German journals of agricultural 
science will be required and used as a text. This course is de- 
signed to give the student a broader knowledge of the recent 
advances in scientific agriculture, and, incidentally, it will aid 
him in making a practical application of a foreign language. It 
is recommended that it be taken after agronomy 12. II.; M., 
W.; 4; (2). Professor Hopkins. 

Bequired: Two years' work in German. 

17. Special Work in Farm Mechanics.— Students may ar- 
range for special work in any of the lines covering drainage or 
farm machinery, either in second semester or the summer. 
(2i-5). Mr. Crane. 

courses for graduates 

101. Systems of Soil Investigation; Sources of Error, 
and Methods of Control, Interpretation of Kesults. Pro- 
fessor Hopkins. 

102. The World's Supply of Plant Food Materials, In- 
cluding Methods of Utilization. Professor Hopkins. 



71 



103. Different Systems of Agricultural Practice and 
their Ultimate Effect Upon the Soil. Professor Hopkins. 

104. Drainage Waters; Surface and Sub-Drainage, 
with Special Keference to Soil Fertility. Professor Hop- 
kins. 

105. Detailed Study of Soil Investigations in Progress 
in Illinois. Professor Hopkins. 

106. Soil Types; Methods of Surveying and Mapping.— 
The work may include field practice. Mr. Mosier. 

107. Erosion of Soils by Surface Washing and Methods 
of Prevention. Mr. Mosier. 

108. The Mechanical Composition of Soils; its Influ- 
ence Upon Granulation, Absorption and Ketention of 
Moisture, and Other Physical Properties Effecting Crop 
Production. Mr. Mosier. 

109. Experimentation in the Production of Field Crops. 
— The work may include actual practice in planning and con- 
ducting field experiments. Mr. Hume. 

110. Weeds: Advanced Study and Investigation Rela- 
ting to their Distribution, Identification, aud Methods 
of Eradication, and Prevention of Dissemination. Mr. 
Hume. 

111. The Selection of Seeds; Methods of Determining 
Quality. Mr. Hume. 

112. Plant Breeding, Including a Detailed Study of 
Experiments at this Station, and of Methods and Results 
Reported From Other States and From Foreign Coun- 
tries. Mr. Smith. 

113. Machine Designing; Advanced Study of Farm Im- 
plements with Special Reference to Possible Improve- 
ments. Mr. Crane. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 
Work is constantly in progress in the various branches 
of animal husbandry at the Experiment Station, and ample 
opportunities are offered graduate students desiring to 
take part in these investigations. The department has 
well chosen representations of all the most prominent breeds 
of livestock, has special facility for investigations pertain- 



72 

mg to food stuffs and nutrition, and for the study of results 
in the production of meats. Opportunities are offered for 
advanced studies in various problems of breeds and breed- 
ing for which the department is supplied with the requisite 
literature and illustrative material. At least two years of 
undergraduate study in the general subject is required for 
major graduate work. 

COUKSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

7. Principles of Stock Feeding. — The functional activities 
of the animal body and the end products of their metabolism. 
Foods are considered first chemically, as affording materials for 
the construction of the body tissues or of animal products, as meat, 
milk, wool, etc.; second, dynamically, as supplying the potential 
energy for the body processes and for external labor; third, as to 
the fertilizing value of their residues. I,; first half; daily; 3; (2i). 
Professor Mumford. 

Bequired: Chemistry 1, 3b, 4, 13; entrance physics or its equiv- 
alent and one year of botany or zoology. 

12. Breeds of Beef Cattle.— The history, development, 
and characteristics of the breeds suitable for beef production. 
Tracing pedigrees and a critical study of the same. (This course 
is intended for students expecting to own or manage pure bred 
herds.) Lectures, assigned readings, and exhaustive practice in 
judging. L; first half; Lectures, M., W., F., 6; Laboratory or prac- 
tical exercises in judging, Tu., Th.; 6, 7; (2|). Professor Mumford. 

Bequired: Animal Husbandry 10, 11. 

14. Management of Pure-Bred Herds of Beef Cattle. 
Like animal husbandry 3, this course is intended for students 
anticipating the management or ownership of registered herds, 
The breeding herd, and its housing, feed and management. 
The selection and fitting of animals for sale and for the show 
ring. Disposal of surplus stock. Lectures and assigned readings. 
I.; second half; daily; 6; (2i). Professor Mumford. 

Bequired: Animal Husbandry 10, 11, 12, and 13. 

17. The Education and Driving of the Horse.— A crit- 
ical study of the mental qualities, peculiarities, and limitations 
of the horse, together with the most successful methods of edu- 
cating and training him for skillful work at labor or on the road. 
The rules and practices of correct driving; the responsibilities of 



73 



the driver and the courtesies of the public highway. Lectures, 
readings, and practice. II. ; second half; daily: 6, 7; (3). 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

101. Development of Type in Domestic Animals.— A 
study of the various factors and conditions involved in the devel- 
opment of type and characteristics in the breeds and strains of 
cattle, horses, sheep and swine, and the bearing of these factors 
and conditions upon future improvement. Professor Mumford. 

102. Animal Nutrition, — Advanced work in the principles 
of nutrition as bearing upon the feeding of animals. Special in- 
vestigations at the Experiment Station, also special study of 
records of investigations and feeding experiments of the depart- 
ment with reference to problems of nutrition. Professor 
Mumford. 

103. Lite Stock Experimentation. — Objects, methods, 
and sources of error in experimental work dealing with the feed- 
ing, breeding and management of farm animals. Detailed study 
of live stock experiments in progress at this station, and a survey 
of past and present work in this line by the various experiment 
stations of the world. Professor Mumford. 

HORTICULTURE 

Exceptional facilities for the prosecution of graduate 
work are offered in the Department of Horticulture. A 
large collection of wax models of fruits and a rapidly 
growing herbarium of economic and ornamental plants 
representing horticultural varieties as well as all the more 
important native and imported species furnish material 
for systematic work in pomology and landscape horticul- 
ture. This work is further facilitated by the large collec- 
tion of apples, flowers and ornamental plants growing 
upon the University grounds. Opportunity is afforded 
for exhaustive studies in problems concerning the pack- 
ing, storage and marketing of apples. Ample provision 
is made for research work in spraying. The greenhouses 
afford facilities for the study of problems in plant propaga- 
tion and commercial floriculture. 

At least two years of collegiate work in horticulture and 



74 



allied subjects and the requisite preparation for the chosen 
subjects are required for entrance upon major work in this 
department. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

6. Nursery Methods.— A study of some details of nursery 
management and their relation to horticulture in general. Lec- 
tures and reference readings. II.; first half; daily; 8, (2£) Assis- 
tant Professor Crandall. 

Bequired: Horticulture 1, 5; entomology 4. 

7. Spraying.— The theory and practice of spraying plants, 
embracing a study of materials and methods employed in the 
combating of insects and fungous diseases. Recitations, refer- 
ence readings, and laboratory work. II. , second half; Becitalions, 
Tu., Th.; 6; Laboratory, M. W., F.; 6, 7; (2*). Mr. Lloyd. 

Bequired: Horticulture 1, entomology 4; chemistry 1. 

8. Orchading. — A comprehensive study of pomaceous fruits: 
apple, pear, quince; drupaceous or stone fruits: plum, cherry, 
peach, nectarine, apricot. Lectures, text-books, and laboratory 
work. II.; Becitations, M. W., F.; 6.; Laboratory, Tu., Th.. 6, 7; 
(5). Professor Blair. 

Bequired: Horticulture 1; botany 1 or 11. 

10. Landscape Gardening.— Ornamental and landscape gar- 
dening, with special reference to the beautifying of home sur- 
roundings. Lectures illustrated by means of lantern slides and 
charts, recitations, reference readings, and practical exercises. 
II. ; M. W., F.; 4; (3). Professor Blair. 

Bequired: Two years of University work, or special prepara- 
tion. 

12. Evolution of Cultivated Plants.— Comprising a study 
of organic evolution and the modification of plants by domesti- 
cation. I.; second half; daily, 3; (21). Assistant Professor Cran- 
dall. 

Bequired: Regular admission; two years of University work, 
including thremmatology. 

15. Commercial Floriculture.— A study of the growing of 
cut flowers and decorative plants. Recitations and practical 
exercises in the greenhouse. II.; daily; 3. (5). Mr. Beal. 

Bequired: Horticulture 4, 5; botany 2. 

18. Experimental Horticulture.— A course for those in- 
tending to engage in professional horticulture or experiment 



75 



station work. For advanced students. L; daily; 1; (5). Profes- 
sor Blair, Mr. Crandall, Mr. Lloyd. 

Bequired: Eegular admission: twenty hours' work in horti- 
culture. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

101. Pomology.— Studies of special problems regarding the 
relationships, adaptations, improvement, propagation, cultiva- 
tion, pruning, protection, preservation or marketing of orchard 
fruits. Arrange time. Professor Blair and Assistant Professor 
Crandall. 

102. Pomology. — Studies of special problems regarding 
the adaptations, propagation, cultivation or pruning of small 
fruits. Arrange time. Assistant Professor Crandall. 

103. Olericulture.— Studies of special problems regarding 
the structure, cultural requirements, seed selection and im- 
provement of vegetables. Arrange time. Assistant Professor 
Lloyd. 

104. Floriculture.— Studies of the horticultural status of 
various flowering plants, or of special problems in the culture 
of greenhouse plants. Arrange time. Mr. Beal. 

105. Landscape Horticulture.— Exhaustive studies of orna- 
mental plants, and methods of grouping the same for the effec- 
tive planting of public and private grounds. Arrange time. Pro- 
fessor Blair. 

106. Forestry.— Problems in general forestry and investiga- 
d ions of forest growths. Arrange time. Professor Burrill. 

thremmatology 

This work offered is primarily for graduate students, but 
it may be taken by undergraduates who have credit for 
thremmatology 1, or who have prosecuted extended studies 
in the problems of evolution. 

course for graduates 

101. Opportunity will be given for special studies in funda- 
mental questions relating to the improvement of domesticated 
animals and plants. For this purpose there is available a liberal 
amount of current and standard literature, together with pedi- 
gree and other live stock records and the breeding experiments 
in progress in the Experiment Station. Professor Davenport. 



76 

SUBJECTS OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

ARCHITECTURE AND ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEER- 
ING 

Professor Bicker, Professor White, Professor Wells, Assist- 
ant Professor McLane, Assistant Professor Temple 

A carefully chosen library of the most useful architec- 
tural works arranged in a room near the drawing rooms. 
The more important architectural periodicals in English, 
French and German. A very large and classified collec- 
tion of photographs and plates from architectural journals 
for reference in designing. Card indexes to several 
American professional journals. Opportunities for exper- 
imental research in steel and concrete construction, heating 
and ventilation, refrigeration, etc., in the various labora- 
tories of this College. Registration for graduate work 
requires a full undergraduate course in Architecture or 
Architectural Engineering. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

101. Construction of Large Wooden Buildings.— Foun- 
dations, floors and ceilings, walls, roofs, economic spacing of 
columns, girders, beams. 

102. New Uses of Stone, Brick, and Terra Cotta.— 
Stone columns, beams, lintels, walls, floors and ceiling; brick piers 
walls, vaulted ceilings, terra cotta columns, architraves, ceilings, 
roofs, and internal finish. 

103. Steel Frame Buildings. — Foundations; cantilever 
girders; columns and their connections; girders, spandrels, and 
beams; roof frames; wind-bracing; economical spacing of col- 
umns and beams; economical planning. 

104. Fire Proofing.— Systems of construction; their campar- ' 
ison; results of tests and of fires; defects to be remedied inordin- 
ary fire-proofing; advantages of fire-proof structures as invest- 
ments. 

105. Sanitation of Public Buildings. — Plumbing and 



77 



fixtures; water supply and sewerage of city and country build- 
ings; examinations, criticisms, and reports on examples: designs 
for particular cases. 

106. Evolution of Architectural Styles.— Tracing the 
development of the column, pier, entablature, door and window, 
ceiling and roof; of designs and purposes of chief buildings; 
changes in decoration; influences of materials and climate. 

107. Advanced Graphic Statics. — The kern and its uses; 
central ellipse or circle of inertia; uses of shear, moment, and 
deflection diagrams for all beams; statics of the arch, vault, 
dome, and of the Gothic buttress system. 

108. Heating and Ventilating Systems. — Application to 
large groups of buildings; designs for large plants; examinations 
and tests of plants with reports; economics of the subject. 

109. Advanced Architectural Designs.— Designing large 
buildings for public or private use, including construction, heat- 
ing and ventilating, sanitation, lighting, with all conveniences 
to save time. 

110. Applied Esthetics.— Theories of proportion and their 
application; study of average proportions in leading architec- 
tural styles; experiments in deviations. 

111. Translation of a French or German Architec- 
tural Work. — Extraction of essentials; condensed translation; 
complete translation submitted for criticism and correction. 

112. Indexing and Classification.— Indexing periodicals 
by Dewey decimal system; collection and arrangement of data 
for professional use; systems of arranging and filing papers and 
drawings. 

113. Stereotomy. — Applications to arches, vaults, domes, 
and stairways, of stone, brick, terra cotta, or steel-concrete; 
working drawings and templates. 

114. SLOW r -BuRNiNG Construction.— The factory mill-floor 
system; European systems; applications; results of tests of fires; 
economics of the systems. 

115. Photography for Architects.— Practice in making 
views of exteriors, interiors, details, and of drawings; lantern 



78 



slides; printing by different processes; mounting and arrange- 
ment. 

116. Copying Specifications and Drawings.— Practice in 
use of different methods; their advantages and defects; improve- 
ments; drawing and tracing for reproduction. 

117. Advanced Perspective.— Study and application of 
higher French methods; lights and shadows; oblique views; re- 
flections; abbreviated methods. 

118. Specifications and Estimates for Large Buildings. 
Study of examples; making outlines; collection and arrangement 
of data; preparation of complete sets. 

119. Industrial Design. — Internal wood-work of buildings; 
floors of parquetry, tiles of mosaics; marble-work; mantels; mov- 
able furniture. 

120. Advanced Water Color Painting.— Practice in out- 
door sketching; rendering elevations and perspectives in ink, 
sepia, color, etc. 

121. Office Arrangements and Methods.— Plans of arch- 
itects' offices; storage and drawings of completed work, filing 
contracts, specifications, tracings and prints of work in progress; 
forms of official papers; bookkeeping for buildings; collection of 
data for reference. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 
Professor Baker. 

The Cement Laboratory is well supplied with equipment 
for the study of problems relating to the structural value 
of cement and lime, and a Road Laboratory is in process 
of installation which will afford facilities for testing the 
road-building qualities of broken stone and gravel. Stud- 
ents in the Civil Engineering Department have opportuni- 
ties for working in the Materials Testing and Hydraulic 
Laboratories, as well as in other laboratories of the Uni- 
versity. For entrance to graduate work a full undergrad- 
uate course in Civil Engineering is required. 



79 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

101. Location and Construction.— Advanced work in the 
economic theory of railway location with relation to the effects 
of distance, grade, and curve upon operation and maintenance. 
Estimates, specifications and contracts, and the improvement of 
existing lines of railway. 

102. Railway Track and Structures, and Their Main- 
tenance. — The design of track standards and of minor rail- 
road structures, trestles, culverts, turn-tables, water-tanks, en- 
gine houses, etc., with special reference to economic principles of 
construction and maintenance. 

103. Yards and Terminals.— The arrangement of tracks, 
buildings, etc., at division and terminal points with reference to 
economy and facility in handling traffic. Personal inspection 
and report on actual cases. 

104. Motive Power and Rolling Stock.— Locomotive con- 
struction and performance, and car building and repairs. 

105. Signal Engineering.— A study of the various systems 
of railway signaling. Personal inspections and comparisons of 
different plants in actual operation. 

106. Railway Operation and Management. — The organi- 
zation and administration of the several branches of service in 
railway operation. 

107. Bridge Design. — A comparative study of the details of 
standard designs, with personal inspection of the process of 
manufacture and erection. 

108. Cantilever and Swing Bridges.— The computation 
of stresses, design of parts, method of erection, etc. 

109. Metallic Arches.— Computation of stresses and de- 
sign of metallic arches. 

110. Metallic Building Construction.— The computation 
and drawings of a design for a metal skeleton building, with a 
consideration of standard connections. 

111. Roof Construction.— Computations of stresses and de- 
signs of steel roof stresses. 

112. Stereotomy. 

113. Theory of the Elastic Arch. 

114. Water Power Development. 

115. Re-enforced Concrete Construction. 



80 



116. Geodesy. — A study of the methods employed in triangu- 
lation, with practice in reading angles: base-line measurements, 
method of least squares and adjustments of triangulation sys- 
tems; map projection; trigonometrical leveling. 

117. Critical Description of Engineering Construc- 
tion.— Details of methods and costs from personal inspection 
during progress of construction. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 
Professor Brooks, Assistant Professor Williams. 

The Department of Electrical Engineering has a well- 
equipped laboratory containing a large variety of dyna- 
mos, motors, transformers, etc., furnishing facilities for 
tests upon the transmision and distribution of power. 
It has a particularly large and well selected cabinet of 
standard measuring and testing instruments. There are 
two photometers, and an assortment of the commercial 
varieties of electric lamps of all types. There is a stor- 
age battery of 60 cells, heating and welding apparatus, 
and an artificial transmission line for making reliable long 
distance transmission tests. The facilities for experi- 
mental engineering, both commercial and theoretical are 
excellent, and will be materially increased. 

A full undergraduate course in Electrical Engineering 
is required for registration in graduate work. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

101. Advanced Theory of Alternating Currents. — 
Discussion of the limitations of theory. Effect of minor errors 
of observation. 

102. Dynamo Electric Machinery.— Standardization of 
armature windings, of design formulas, and of test methods. 
Study of leakage flux. 

103. Alternating Current Machinery.— Transformers 
and their connections for single and polyphase working. Meth- 
ods of compensation. The series and repulsion motor; operating 
efficiencies. 

104. Transmission of Power.— Limiting conditions as re- 



gards voltage, distance, charging current, and frequency. Types 
of machines. Experiments with artificial line. 

105. Electric Light and Power Plants. — Economic lim- 
itations. Comparison of different designs. Determination of 
highest efficiency. 

106. Electro-Metallurgy.— Experiments with the electric 
furnace. Refining of metals; recent storage batteries, and their 
possible improvement. 

107. Electric Lighting. — Study of artistic illumination. 
Limitation of frequency for various types of lamps. Increased 
safety of wiring. 

108. Electrical Engineering Research.— Problems to be 
assigned on consultation. 

109. Electrical Design. — Standard practice. Discussion 
of improvements. 

110. Telephone Engineering.— Standardization of appa- 
ratus. Switchboard design. Line testing. Methods for increas- 
ing efficiency and possible distance. Cables. 

111. Telegraph Engineering. — Study of commercial con- 
ditions. Determination of best method or rapid machine-trans- 
mission. Simultaneous telegraphy and telephony. Wireless 
telegraphy in relation to ordinary telegraphy, and in regard to 
improvements. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Breckenridge, Assistant Professor Goodenough, 

Assistant Professor Leutwiler, Assistant Professor 

Randall. 

The equipment available for experimental investigation 
in the Department of Mechanical Engineering is most 
complete along the following lines: 

1. Boiler tests with various types of furnace and stokers. 

2. The generation of power with engines of different types 
and at various steam pressures up to 275 lb. 

3. The use of steam for heating from a central station, loss 
of pressure, and heat by transmission through long mains. 



82 

4. The generation, transmission and use of compressed air. 

5. The generation of power by small gas or gasoline motors, 
including the testing of automobile vehicles. 

6. Mechanical refrigeration.— There are three plants availa- 
ble for testing and examinination. 

7. Locomotive road testing and train resistance tests.— For 
this work the department owns with the Illinois Central Kail- 
road a fully equipped railway test car. 

8. The measurement of power required to operate machine 
tools and woodworking machinery.— This includes tests relating 
to the performance of various tools and the comparison of differ- 
ent kinds of tool steel. 

The construction of a new Steam Engineering Labora- 
tory, for the equipment of which a generous appropriation 
has been made, will greatly increase the space and facilities 
of the department for experimentation. 

A complete equipment will be added for experiments in 
the subject of heating and ventilation, as well as for the 
production of superheated steam. 

Arrangements have been made with the management of 
the Peoria & Eastern Railway shops at Urbana for carry- 
ing on many tests and investigations on a commercial 
scale, not usually possible in a school laboratory, and 
much valuable aid is assured the department by the officers 
of this company. These shops are new, extensive and 
modern in all respects. There is required a full under- 
graduate course in Mechanical Engineering for entrance 
upon graduate work. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

101. Advanced Machine Design.— The work offered in ma- 
chine design will be arranged to suit individual students. It 
covers a wide field and may include all forms of motors as well 
as usual and special machinery. 



83 



102. Graphics and Kinematics.— The application of graphi- 
cal dynamics, especially to governors. A study of acceleration 
in mechanisms, using Coriolis' law as a basis. 

103. Mill Engineering.— Transmission of power; design 
and installation of power plants. 

104. Steam Engineering.— Critical study of superheating, 
jacketing, compounding; steam turbines: the generation of steam. 

105. Experimental Engineering.— Tests of engines, boil- 
ers, air compressors, power plants, pumping plants, etc. 

106. Thermodynamics. —Reading of advanced texts, as Park- 
er's or Buckingham's. Critical study of cycles, both direct and 
reversed. Solution of numerous problems. 

107. Pneumatics. — Air compression; transmission of air 
through pipes; theory and design of centrifugal fans and blow- 
ers; blowing engines. 

108. Hydraulic Machinery.— Pumps and pumping engines; 
centrifugal and rotary pumps; hydraulic presses, punches, cranes, 
etc.; hydraulic elevators; hydraulic transmission. 

109. Machinery and Manufacturing.— Shop construction 
and methods; cost-keeping systems; automatic machinery and 
interchangeable parts; adaptation of special machinery to the 
various industries. 

110. Translation of Technical Engineering Litera- 
ture. — Under this head is included the translation of engineer- 
ing books and also of important articles appearing in Zeitschrift 
des Yereines Deutscher Ingeneur, Eevue de Mecanique, etc. 

111. Heat Engines and Gas Engineering.— The various 
heat engine cycles; temperature-entropy analysis applied to heat 
engines; engines with two or more fluids; general theory of the 
gas engine; gas producers; gaseous fuels. 

112. Locomotive Engineering. — Study of the design and 
constructing of locomotives; counterbalancing; road tests of loco- 
motives. 

113. Mechanical Refrigeration.— -Thermodynamic the- 
ory of refrigeration; properties of refrigerating fluids. Study of 
ice and refrigeration plants. 

114. Motor Vehicles. — The various types of automobiles. 

115. Indexing and Classification of Engineering Lit- 
erature. 



84 

MECHANICS, THEORETICAL AND APPLIED 

Professor Talbot. 
The Laboratory of Applied Mechanics with its well- 
arranged building, numerous testing machines of various 
types for making tension, compression, cross-bending, 
and torsion tests of structural materials, the special facil- 
ities for testing paving brick, and its commodious hy- 
draulic laboratoiy well fitted with tanks, piping, channels, 
pumps, motors and measuring devices, offers exceptional 
facilities for investigational work. New equipment is to 
be added, including a 500,000 lb. testing machine. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

101. Analytical Mechanics.— Studies of advanced texts; 
comparisons of texts and methods and presentation for an ele- 
mentary course. 

102. Resistance of Materials.— Study of the properties of 
structural materials, of the methods of testing for these proper- 
ties, and of the determination of internal stresses. 

103. Hydraulics and Hydraulic Engineering. — Ad- 
vanced work in hydraulics. 

104. Laboratory of Applied Mechanics. — Investigational 
work either in the materials testing laboratory or in the hy- 
draulic laboratory. 

MUNICIPAL AND SANITAEY ENGINEERING 

Professor Talbot, Mr. Slocum 
The University water works and the hydraulic labora- 
tory, as well as the bacteriological and chemical labora- 
tories, offer advantages to the student in water supply 
engineering and sewerage, and near-by cities give oppor- 
tunities for a study of water filtration and sewage disposal 

plants. 

courses for graduates 
101. Tanks, Standpipes and Reservoirs.— Design and 
methods of construction of these structures. Especial attention 
to the cause of failure of standpipes and to requirements for safe 
construction. Study of plans of existing structures and of meth- 
ods of construction employed. 



85 

102. Sources and Requirements of Water Supply for 
a City and Removal of Impurities. — A study of the various 
sources of supply and of their development, of methods of filtra- 
tion, and of the design and operation of filtered plants. 

103. Water Works Management and Economics.— Water 
works records; revenue, operation, management, franchises and 

their relation to the public, with a study of existing plants. 

104. Pumps and Pumping.— Types of pump; design, con- 
struction, operation, duty and efficiency; applicability of differ- 
ent types; duty trials and tests. 

105. General Water Works Construction.— When prac- 
ticable a discussion will be made of plans, methods, and construc- 
tion of work with which the student has been connected. 

106. Biological and Chemical Examination of Potable 
Water.— This will be given in connection with the departments 
of botany and chemistry. 

107. Description of Water Supply Systems.— Critical dis- 
cussion of water-works systems from personal observation made 
during construction and upon the operation of similar plants. 

111. Sewage Purification.— A study of the processes and 
methods in use, of the results obtained, and of the requirements 
and needs of sewage disposal. 

112. Sewage Disposal Works.— The design and methods of 
construction of various forms of purification plants and of their 
applicability and efficiency. 

113. General Seaverage Design and Construction. — 
This usually involves the actual work of designing and partici- 
pating in the work of construction of systems of sewers. 

114. City Sanitation. — Methods and processes of garbage 
collection, reduction and disposal; sanitary restrictions and 
health measures. 

115. Description of Sewerage Systems.— Critical exami- 
nation and description from personal observations made during 
construction and upon the operation of sewerage systems. 

118. Economic Aspect of Good Eoads and Pavements.— 
An investigation of the value of road improvements. 

119. Construction of Koads and Pavements.— Tests and 
requirements of meterials. Specifications. Comparison of cost, 
desirability and durability. Grades and location. 



86 



SOCIETIES AND CLUBS 

CLUBS AUXILIARY TO COURSES OF STUDY 
Agricultural Club 

This club meets weekly. It is devoted to the discussion 
of topics of theoretical and practical interest to students 
of agriculture. All students connected with the Univer- 
sity are eligible to membership. 

Architects' Club 
This club meets once in two weeks for the consideration 
of current topics of architectural interest and subjects con- 
nected with the study of architectural history . All students 
pursuing architectural studies are eligible to membership. 
This club is a member of the Architectural League of 
America, and contributes to its annual exhibition in the 
principal cities of the United States. 

Biological Theory Club 

This club meets on alternate Monday evenings through- 
out the college year for papers, addresses, and discussions 
on subjects in theoretical biology. Its membership is com- 
posed of instructors in biological subjects in the Colleges 
of Science and Agriculture. 

Civil Engineering Club 

This club meets the second and fourth Saturday even- 
ings of each month for the reading and discussion of papers 
relating to civil engineering. All students pursuing the 
civil engineering course may become members. 

The English Club 
The English Club is composed of members of the Fac- 
ulty, and of students who have done especially good work 
in English. The work of the club is confined to the study 



87 

of recent writers of fiction and of poetry. The member- 
ship is limited to thirty. Meetings are held on the second 
Monday of each month. 

French Club 
Le Cercle Francais includes students who have had at 
least one year's work in French. The club meets twice a 
month throughout the year. Its proceedings are conducted 
in French, the object being to supplement the work of the 
class room by the practical handling and understanding of 
the language. 

Library Club 

The instructors and students of the Library School have 
organized a Library Club. Any member of the staff of 
the University library, of the Champaign public library, 
or of the Urbana public library, or any student who is 
registered for the Library School may become an active 
member. Trustees of the three libraries before mentioned 
are considered honorary members. Any others interested 
in library progress may become associate members. 

Meetings are held once in three weeks during the college 
year. The first and last meetings of the year are of a social 
nature. The intervening meetings are devoted to topics 
of literary or technical library interest. 

Mathematical Club 
The Mathematical Club is open for membership to the 
instructors and students of mathematics at the University. 
It meets once in two weeks to discuss questions of interest 
in pure and applied mathematics. 

Mechanical and Electrical Engineering Society. 
This club meets on the second and fourth Friday even- 
ings of each month. All students pursuing mechanical 
and electrical engineering studies are eligible to member- 
ship. Papers relating to subjects of interest to members 
are presented and discussed at each meeting. 



88 



Musical Clubs 
These include the Choral Society, Orchestra, Band, and 
Mandolin and Guitar, and two Glee Clubs. 

The Natural History Society 

This society is composed of instructors and students in- 
terested in the natural sciences. It conducts field excursions 
and exhibitions of objects of natural history, and provides 
occasional lectures on science subjects of general interest. 
Political Science Ciub 

This club is composed of the members of the corps of 
instruction in history, economics and law, and of such 
students of at least junior and senior standing as make 
a record for marked excellence in work in these depart- 
ments. It meets once a month. 

Zoological Club 

The University Zoological Club is composed of ad- 
vanced students and instructors in the zoological and 
physiological departments, together with such other bio- 
logical instructors and advanced students as are interested 
in its subjects. Its sessions are devoted to the presenta- 
tion and discussion of abstracts of recent biological litera- 
ture and of the results of investigation by the members of 
the club. It meets weekly in Natural History Hall. 

Literary Societies 

The Adelphic and Philomathean societies for men, and 

the Alethenai for women, occupy large halls, which the 

members have appropriately furnished and decorated. 

Meetings are held Friday evenings throughout term time. 

THE CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 
Young Men's and Young Women's Christian Associations 

The Young Men's and Young .Women's Christian Asso- 
ciations have come to occupy a prominent place in the 
University life. Both are affiliated with the World's Stu- 



89 

dent Christian Federation, which is the largest student 
organization in existence. 

Five hundred and fifteen men now belong to the Young 
Men's, and three hundred women to the Young Women's, 
Association. Each association employs for full time a 
general secretary. 

The Association House furnishes free to all students, 
reading room, game room, library, parlors, piano, maga- 
zines and papers, correspondence tables and telephone — a 
college home. 

Religious meetings for men are held on Sunday morn- 
ings; for women on Thursday afternoons; and for both 
men and women on Monday evenings. There are fre- 
quent meetings for the promotion of social intercourse 
and good fellowship. 

Courses in systematic Bible study and in modern mis- 
sions are offered. During the year four hundred and 
twenty-nine men and two hundred women have enrolled 
in these courses. A most helpful feature of the work is 
that in the interest of new students at the opening of 
the school year. Desirable rooms and boarding places 
are found and posted for reference as the Association 
House. Representatives of the Associations meet the 
trains, assist students in finding satisfactory locations, and 
endeavor in every way to make them feel at home. The 
employment bureau helps to find work. 

A copy of the Students' Hand-Book, containing a map 
of the cities, and giving information about Champaign 
and Urbana, the University, and the various college or- 
ganizations and activities, will be sent free to prospective 
students. 

For further information address the General Secretary 
of either Association, Champaign. 



90 



EXPENSES 

BOARD 

The University does not furnish board, but there are 
a large number of suitable places within easy walking 
distance of the University or readily accessible by elec- 
tric railway where students can find table board at from 
$3.00 to $3.50 per week each, and rooms (suitable for 
two) at about $36.00 to $54.00 for a semester of 18 weeks. 

The Young Men's and Young Woman's Christian Asso- 
ciations aid new students in procuring rooms and board- 
ing places. 

FEES 

The fees for members of the Graduate School are the 
same as for undergraduate students of the Colleges of Lit- 
erature and Arts, Agriculture, and Engineering as follows: 

Matriculation, payable upon entrance $10.00 

Diploma, payable before degree is awarded 5.00 

Incidental, each semester 12.00 

Laboratory, actual expenses, deposits 50c to 10.00 



91 



LIST OF STUDENTS 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 

CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

*Crocker, William, A. M., 1903, DeKalb, Botany. 

Day, Edna Daisy, M. S., {Univ. of Mich.), 18a7, Urbana, Botany. 

Dewey, James Ansel, M. S., 1898, Urbana, Bacteriology. 

Gleason, Henry Allen, B. S., 1901, Champaign, Botany. 

Heuse, Edward Otto, B. S. (Hanover, Coll.), 1900, Madison, Ind., 
Chemistry. 

Latzer, Jennie Mary, M. S., 1900, Highland, Botany. 

Matson, George Charleton, A. M., [Cornell Univ.), 1903, Cham- 
paign, Geology. 

Miller, John Ezra, A. M., 1902, Urbana, Latin. 

Pillsbury, Bertha Marion, A. M., (Radcliffe College), 1899, English. 

Ponzer, Ernest William, M. S., 1903, Champaign, Mathematics. 

Reeves, George L, A. B., 1902, Wauponsee, Zoology. 

*Ross, Luther Sherman, M. S., 1900, Bes Moines, la., Zoology. 

Sakagami, Yasuzo, M. L., (Univ. of Minn.), 1899, Wakagamaken, 
Japan, Political Science. 

Sammis, John Langley, M.S. 1899, Champaign, Chemistry. 

Schulz, William Frederick, E. E., 1900, Urbana, Physics. 

Zartman, Lester William, A. B., 1903, Grant Park, Economics. 

CANDIDATES FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE 

Anderson, Mary, A. B., 1903, Mamn, Mathematics. 
Barrett, James Theophilus, A B., 1903, Urbana. Botany. 
Black, Alice Mary, A. B., 1900, Champaign, Latin. 
*Bond, Anna Louise, A. B., 1903, Mt. Vernon, English. 
*Booker, Lucile Alice, A. B., 1899, Stillwater, Minn., English. 
Briscoe, Charley Francis, A. B., (Indiana State Univ.), 1899, Ur- 
bana, Botany. 
*Bullock, Jessie Jane, A. B., 1900, Champaign, Mathematics. 
*Church, Walter Samuel, B. S., 1900, Chicago, Architecture. 
*Clark, Mary Edith, A. B., 1899, Sheldon, Philosophy. 



*In absentia. See page 29. 



92 



Clarke, Samuel C, B. S., (Univ. of Chicago), 1900, TJrbana, Chem- 
istry. 

*Clarke, Edwin Besancon, B. S., 1891, Chicago, Architecture. 

JCollis, Frank Bernard, B. S., 1902, Norwich, Conn., Mechanical 
Engineering - . 

Crosthwait, George Ashley, B. $., 1903, Moscow, Idaho, Agronomy. 

Crane, Fred Randall, B. S., (Mich, Agr'l Coll.), 1899, TJrbana, Agro- 
nomy. 

Dickerson, Oliver Morton, A. B. 1903, West Liberty, History. 

Dillon, Gertrude Sempill, A. B. 1901, Sheldon, German. 

East, Edward Murray, B. S., 1901, Champaign, Agronomy. 

Emmett, Arthur Donaldson, B. S., 1901, TJrbana, Chemistry. 

Falkenberg, Fred Peter, A. B., 1902, Chicago, English. 

Fox, Harry Bert, B. S., 1900, TJrbana, Geology. 

Franklin, Lois Gertrude, A. B., 1903, Dwight, History. 

Fritter, Enoch Abraham, A. M., (Findlay Coll.) 1898, Normal, 
English. 

*Fucik, Edward James, B. S., 1901, Chicago, Civil Engineering. 

*Gallaher, Thomas Theron, A. B., 1902, Byron, Philosophy. 

Garlough, Carl D, A. M., (Hillsdale, Coll.), 1900, Stanford, Mathe- 
matics. 

Gilkerson, Frances Emeline, A. B., 1903, TJrbana, German. 

*Greenman. Edwin Gardner, Jr., B. S.,1902, Champaign, Mechan- 
ical Engineering. 

*G rimes, George Lyman, B. S., 1897, Kewanee, Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

Harris, Thomas Luther, A. B., 1902, Modesto, Economics. 

Hayhurst, Emery Roe, A. B., 1903, Maywood, Physiology. 

*Heath, Lawrence Seymour, A. B. 1901, Edinburg, Latin. 

*Hicks, Byron Wallace, B. S., 1901, Warren, Civil Engineering. 

*Higgins, Francis Whitson, B. S., 1902, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 
Chemistry. 

Horl, Edna DuBois, A. B., 1903, Chicago Heights, Chemistry. 

*Hoppin, Charles Albert, B. S., 1901, Milwaukee, Wis., Mechanical 
Engineering. 

Horner, Harlan Hoyt, A. B., 1901, TJrbana, English. 

Hughes, Clarence Wilbert, A. B., 1900, TJrbana, History. 



$Died, November 5, 1903. 



93 



Ingels, Bert Dee, B. S., (DePauw Univ.), 1903, Greencastle* Ind., 
Chemistry. 

♦Ireland, Washington Parker, B. S., 1903, Chicago, Civil Engi- 
neering. 

♦Johnson, Frederick Dawson, B. S., 1903, Alton, Mechanical En- 
gineering. 

♦Johnson, Fred Vollentine, B. S. 1902, Harvey, Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

Jones, Warren, A. B., 1902, Aurora, Eduation. 

Kelley, Frances Emily, A. B., 1901, St. David, German. 

♦Kofoid, Reuben Nelson, A. B., 1902, Buffalo, JST. Y., Chemistry. 

Lafferty, Guy Clifford, A. B., {Monmouth, Coll), 1903, Alexis, 
Economics. 

Larson, Lawrence Fred, A. B. 1903, Galva, Economics. 

♦Layton, Katherine Alberta, A. B., 1901, Canton, German. 

Lytle, Ernest Barnes, B. S., 1901, TJrbana, Mathematics. 

♦McConnell, Ernest, B. S., 1894, Denver, Colo., Architecture. 

♦McLane, John Wallace, B. S., 1901, Washington, D. C,f Agron- 
omy. 

Malcolm, Charles Wesley, B. S., 1902, Boseville, Civil Engineering. 

*Martin, Albert Carey, B. S., 1902, LaSalle, Architecture. 

Matthews, Robert Clayton, B. S., 1902, ChampoAgn, Mechanical 
Engineering. 

♦Mayall, Edwin Lyman, B. S., 1900, Peoria, Mechanical Engineer- 
ing. 

Miller, Harry Crawford, A. B. (Austin, Coll.), 1893, Nokomis, Edu- 
cation. 

Moor, Rev. George Caleb, Ph. &.,(Ewing, Coll.), 1899, Champaign, 
English. 

♦O'Hair, Elizabeth Edna, A. B., 1901, Laurel, Lid., Latin. 

Parker, Lawrence Gilbert, B. S., 1902, Toluca, Civil Engineering. 

*Parr, Robert William, A. B., 1903, Pontiac, Economics. 

Ponzer, Ernest William, B. S., 1900, Champaign, Mathematics. 

♦Radcliflie, William Hickman, B. S., 1901, Chicago, Civil Engineer- 
ing. 

Randall, Dwight T. B. $., 1897, Uroana, Mechanical Engineer- 
ing. 



94 



*Richard, Frederick William, B. S., 1891, Carterville, Mechanical 
Engineering. 

Kolfe, Martha Deette, B. S., 1900. Champaign, Zoology. 

Rolfe, Mary Annette, A. B., 1902, Champaign, Zoology. 

*Sawyer, Geogre Loyal, B. S., 1903, Chicago, Municipal and San- 
itary Engineering. 

*Scudder, Harry Disbro, B. S., 1902, Chicago, Horticulture. 

*Skinner, Elgie Ray, B. S., 1903, Chicago, Mechanical Engineer- 
ing. 

Slocum, Roy Harley, B. S., 1900, Urbana, Municipal and Sanitary 
Engineering. 

*Smith, Bruce, A. B., 1901, Newman, English. 

*Smith, Florence Mary, A. B., 1899, Urbana, English. 

Smith, Fred John, A. B., (Iowa Wesleyan University), 1899, San 
Jose, German. 

*Smith, George Russell, B. S., 1900, Urbana, Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

*Smith, Percy Almerin, B. S., 1901, Hiroshima, Japan, Mathema- 
tics and Physics. 

*Soverhill, Harvey Allen, B. S., 1900, Beloit, Wis., Mechanical 
Engineering. 

^Sperling, Godfrey, B. S., 1895, Boise, Idaho, Civil Engineering. 

*Stine, John Carl, A. B., 1903, Assumption, Education. 

*Strehlow, Oscar Emil, B. S., 1895, Tuscaloosa, Ala., Civil Engi- 
neering. 

^Sussex, James Wolfe, B. S., 1903, Abingdon, Civil Engineering. 

*Swanberg, Floyd Ludwig, B. S., 1902, Danville, Mechanical En- 
gineering. 

*Sweeney, Don, B. S., 1896, Galesburg, Mechanical Engineering. 

Taylor, Helen Mary, A. B., 1902, Bloomington, English. 

*Terry, Charles Dutton, B. S., 1897, Kewanee, Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

*Tower, Willis Eugene, B. S. s 1891, Chicago, Physics. 

*Tull, Effle May, A. B., 1901, Farmer City, Latin. 

Waterbury, Leslie Abram, B. S., 1902, Urbana, Civil Engineering. 

Webber, Roy Irvin, B. S., (Purdue Univ.), 1899, Urbana, Civil En- 
gineering. 

Wells, Miriam Ursula, A B., 1903, Maiden, Zoology. 

Western, Irving Mark, A. B., 1902, Dundee, Rhetoric. 



95 



*Whitehouse, Edith Ursula, A. B., 1902, Canton, Latin. 
*Whitmeyer, Mark Halbert B. S., 1899, Danville, Architecture. 
Whitsit, Hammond William, B. S., 1903, TJrbana, Architecture. 
*Wilcox, Maurice Meacham, B. S., 1899, Kentwood, La., Civil En- 
gineering. 
Williams, Winifred Sue, A. B., 1901, TJrbana, German. 
Willis, Clifford, B. S., 1900, TJrbana, Agronomy. 
Wilson, Joseph Wade, B. S., 1903, Chicago, Architecture. 
*Wright, Sidney Walter, A. B., 1901, Mechanicsburgh, History. 
*Wood, Harvey Edgerton, A. B., 1900, Joliet, Economics. 
Young, Sadie, B. S., {Univ. of Fla,), 1902, Lake City, Fla., English. 

NOT CANDIDATES FOR A DEGREE 

Calhoun, Henrietta Anne, A.M., 1903, Champaign, Physiology. 

Fox, Fred Gates, A.M., 1903, TJrbana, English. 

Lefler, Emma Grace, B. L. S., 1903, Pontiac, English. 

Lloyd, John William, M. S. A., (Cornell Univ.), 1903, Champaign, 

Botany. 
Zangerle, Arthur Norman, B. S., 1903, Chicago, Chemistry. 



96 



SUMMARY OF STUDENTS— 1903-1904 

Men. Women. Total. 

Graduate School 94 26 1 20 

Under Graduate Colleges— 

Seniors 170 104 274 

Juniors 186 72 258 

Sophomores 388 87 375 

Freshmen 439 134 573 

Specials 196 106 302 

I 279 503 I 782 

Specials in Agriculture 1 33 I 1 34 

Specials in Household Science . 14 14 

Summer Term 137 92 229 

College of Law — 

Third year 36 36 

Second year 27 27 

First year 52 52 

Specials 27 27 

142 142 

College of Medicine — 

Seniors 227 18 245 

Juniors 178 12 190 

Sophomores 132 11 143 

Freshmen 85 9 94 

Unclassified 19 3 22 

641 53 694 

College of Dentistry — 

Seniors 56 3 59 

Juniors 64 1 65 

Freshmen 39 39 

1 59 4 1 63 

School of Pharmacy— 

Seniors 68 68 

Juniors 116 1 117 

1 84 I 1 85 

Academy i 89 68 257 

2958 762 3720 

Deduct counted twice 80 44 1 24 

Total in University 2878 718 3596 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 




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